Monthly Archives: December 2008

Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) 2009 Preseason Top 20 Poll: Chapman, Michigan And Arizona State Are Top 3


mcla_logo

 

MCLA Division I – Preseason Poll 

1. Chapman
2. Michigan
3. Arizona State
4. BYU
5. Simon Fraser
6. Colorado State
7. Minnesota-Duluth
8. Florida State
9. UCSB
10. Sonoma
11. Georgia
12. Virginia Tech
13. Texas A&M
14. Boston College
15. Florida
16. Colorado
17. Oregon
18. Lindenwood
19. Claremont
20. Northeastern

Preseason Player of the Year: Mike Clayton, Chapman

“Lacrosse Nutrition”: Student-Athletes, Boys And Girls, Must Fuel Body With Proper Combination Of Complex Carbs And Protein


“Know how important it is to keep the body fueled, not just on game day but all week, all season.”

“…multiply your body weight by 15 if male and 13 if female, add the number of calories you burn in a one-hour workout and you have the number of daily calories you need to maintain your current weight…”

So, if you are a 140-pound field-hockey player, you need about 2,320 calories daily to maintain your weight during the season (140×13=1,820+500=2,320). If you are a 200-pound football lineman, you need 3,740 calories.

wholegrainpancakes1

Carbohydrates, protein and fat are the three sources of calories for an athlete’s fuel tank. Carbs provide the energy for muscles during anaerobic activity such as running. Complex carbs such as whole-grain breads and cereals, bagels, pancakes, waffles, pasta, rice, potatoes, beans, fruits and vegetables are better than simple carbs such as table sugar, candy, sweets and soda because they contain fiber, vitamins and minerals as well as energy.

“No one should skip breakfast. You need breakfast for brain activity as well. If you don’t have breakfast, you will compromise your learning ability,” he said. His choices run the gamut from eggs and pancakes to cereal and fruit to frozen waffles with peanut butter and banana, “a great sandwich.”

  http://www.projo.com/sports/mikeszostak/sp_hs_mike_szostak_20_12-20-08_RFCLB0T_v12.34bd874.html

Nutrition expert Tim Wierman suggests that in many cases athletes who “run out of gas” never had a full tank to start with. They shortchanged themselves by not eating the proper food at the proper time in the proper amount, and when their muscles called for fuel, their gas tank delivered only fumes.

“Athletes need enough calories to avoid fatigue,” Wierman told an audience of about 250 high school athletes, coaches and parents during a 2 1/2-hour program on nutrition at Rhode Island College this month. “Athletes can’t afford to consume too few calories. You will compromise your ability to run.”

 

Wierman is president of Nutrition Education Services Inc., based in West Chester, Pa. A soccer player in college, he is an endurance athlete now, a veteran of 60 triathlons, among them the Ironman USA. He appeared at RIC as part of a health-related series sponsored by the Rhode Island Interscholastic League.

Wierman understands from his own experience the need to fuel the body before an event. Or, as he has dubbed his program, the need to Eat to Compete. He has preached this simple message to high school and college athletes and coaches across the nation: “Know how important it is to keep the body fueled, not just on game day but all week, all season.”

How much fuel is necessary to fill the tank? Here’s Wierman’s formula: multiply your body weight by 15 if male and 13 if female, add the number of calories you burn in a one-hour workout and you have the number of daily calories you need to maintain your current weight.

Consume more calories or decrease your exercise, and you will gain weight. Consume fewer calories or increase your exercise, and you will lose weight. Simple.

So, if you are a 140-pound field-hockey player, you need about 2,320 calories daily to maintain your weight during the season (140×13=1,820+500=2,320). If you are a 200-pound football lineman, you need 3,740 calories.

 

“Anything less than 2,000 calories a day and you’re compromising your health and not being fair to your team,” Wierman said.

He is sensitive to the pressure society places on girls and young women to play like jocks but look like models.

“You don’t have to be a thin athlete to be a fit athlete,” he said, citing the tennis champion Serena Williams. Bigger than many players on the pro tour, she is fit, unless her knees are bothering her.

Wierman told the story of a Division II college basketball player who weighed 138 pounds and was the starting point guard at the end of her junior year. When she returned in the fall for her senior season, she weighed 120.

“She lost 18 pounds over the summer. She also lost her three-point shot, her speed, her stamina and her starting position,” he said. “If you want to be a runway model, you should not be out on the field.”

Where those calories come from and when are also critical to an athlete’s performance. Carbohydrates, protein and fat are the three sources of calories for an athlete’s fuel tank. Carbs provide the energy for muscles during anaerobic activity such as running. Complex carbs such as whole-grain breads and cereals, bagels, pancakes, waffles, pasta, rice, potatoes, beans, fruits and vegetables are better than simple carbs such as table sugar, candy, sweets and soda because they contain fiber, vitamins and minerals as well as energy.

Muscle tissue is 72 percent water and 22 percent protein, with the remaining 6 percent fats, carbohydrates and nutrients. Protein is essential to build and maintain muscle but is not a source of energy for muscle. Lean meat, chicken, turkey, pork, fish, seafood, eggs and low-fat dairy products are sources of protein.

Fat is stored energy but needs at least 30 minutes to become available as body fuel and so is an energy source for light to medium aerobic exercise of longer duration such as walking. Unsaturated fats in vegetable oils are beneficial. Saturated fats in dairy and animal products are less desirable because over time they can build up deposits in arteries.

An athlete should consume up to 70 percent of his or her total calories from carbohydrates — no more than 10 percent from simple carbs — 25 percent or less from fat, and 15 percent from proteins.

“Do not drop below 60 percent carbs. If you do, you won’t be topping off your fuel tank,” Wierman said.

Every athlete eating to compete should start with breakfast.

“No one should skip breakfast. You need breakfast for brain activity as well. If you don’t have breakfast, you will compromise your learning ability,” he said. His choices run the gamut from eggs and pancakes to cereal and fruit to frozen waffles with peanut butter and banana, “a great sandwich.”

“Bagels are OK, but go light on the condiments. Pancakes are OK, but go light on the syrup and butter. Pancakes within three hours are in your hamstrings, glutes and quads. When you skip that breakfast, you’re compromising your after-school practice,” he said.

A slice or two of cold pizza is better than nothing, but skip the bacon and sausage because they “are doing nothing for your performance in the afternoon.”

Lunch is important, and if it’s late morning, then a pre-practice or pre-game snack in equally important. So is having something to eat shortly after a workout, which Wierman calls recovery. A peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich, an energy bar or even a slice or two of bread is an ideal quick snack.

Wierman cautioned that “one pregame meal will not make up for a week of eating garbage or not eating.” Game-day intake should be simple. “You’re not there to satisfy your palate four to six hours before a game,” he said. And a recovery snack or small meal the sooner the better is important, especially during a season with multiple games in a week. He said that “too many athletes do a lousy job of recovery from one day to the next,” and that “what you do after one practice will dictate how you do in 24 hours.”

Staying hydrated with water, juice and sports drinks is essential, and Wierman offered this recipe for a homemade sports drink: ½ water, ½ juice (apple, cranberry) and a pinch of salt. If urine runs clear, the body is hydrated. If it runs yellow, it’s dehydrated and time to “get on the water bottle.”

Wierman sympathized with athletes trying to stay hydrated during the day needing frequent bathroom breaks. “That’s a challenge, and I don’t have an answer,” he said. Morning practices are another challenge, and he suggested a 500-calorie snack before bed and a banana in the morning. For night games, he suggested a good lunch and a mid-afternoon meal about four hours before game time.

Athletes should be aware of portion size — piece of meat or fish the size of a deck of cards is ideal — and beware of fast food, he advised. If your craving for a big burger is so great, accompany it with a salad and juice rather than fries and super-size soda.

“French fries,” he said, “don’t do much for us whatsoever.”

Lacrosse On TV In 2008: Huge Increase In Air Time Included ESPN, Time Warner, CSTV/CBS College Sports And CN8


espnlacrosse

http://blogs.insidelacrosse.com/2008/12/29/ils-top-stories-of-2008-no-1/#more-4761

ESPN

In 2000, the ESPN family carried three NCAA lacrosse games and two MLL games. In 2005, the ESPN family carried 13 NCAA lacrosse games and eight MLL games. In 2008, ESPN and ESPN2 aired two NCAA regular season and three tournament games, two episodes of “Inside Lacrosse on ESPN” and 11 MLL games, and ESPNU aired 47 NCAA regular-season and tournament games and one episode of “Inside Lacrosse on ESPN.”

Time Warner

In 2000, Time Warner produced five men’s and four women’s lacrosse games. In 2005, TW carried or produced 14 men’s lacrosse games and produced one women’s game. In 2008, TW produced/aired 13 men’s games, three NLL games and carried 21 MLL games.

CSTV/CBS College Sports

CBS College Sports launched in 2002 as CSTV, and in 2005 it broadcast 21 live college games and the IFWLA World Championship. In 2008, the network broadcast 21 live college games, including the Division I women’s semifinals and finals and the championships for men’s and women’s DII and DIII.

CN8

In 2000, CN8 aired two college lacrosse games. In 2005, it aired six college lacrosse games. Their 2008 college lacrosse schedule featured 13 games, including the ECAC Game of the Week.

“Lacrosse Recruting” Update: “Lacrosse Recruiting Camp Guide” From “Lacrosserecruits” Reviews Top Camps For 2009


recruiting-camp-guide

http://lacrosserecruits.blogspot.com/

Blue Chip 225
Bryant College, RI

Summary:

It is the premier recruiting camp for high school lacrosse players in the Northeast. You can expect to be coached during the week in both practice and game situations by college coaches, and to be observed by other college coaches who attend camp as observers and evaluators. You can expect to learn about the college recruiting process from the people who do it. What are the recruiting rules; who to talk to; what to expect on visits, how to communicate with coaches and a whole lot more.

Overheard:

“This camp is the best of its kind in the Northeast. If you aren’t going to Jake Reed’s Blue Chip and you want to play up North, you better be going to this Blue Chip.”

Our Take:

It is on point to say that this is the best recruiting camp in the Northeast. Coach Spencer does a great job drawing top talent to the camp along with loads of D1, D2 and D3 coaches. This year, he joined forces with Coach Pressler to host the camp at Bryant. The new location secures its spot as a Northeast destination. Blue Chip 225 is one of the best options for players who do not attend Jake Reed’s camps and want to attend college in the north.

Elite 180 Lacrosse Camp
Keene State, NH

Summary:

As the Head Coach of the Amherst College Lacrosse team, Coach Tom Carmean found it to be ineffective to travel to each and every recruiting venue looking for that small faction of student/athlete who could meet the academic and athletic demands of the Northeast’s most prestigious colleges. In turn, Elite 180 seeks to bring together the nation’s best student/athletes with the some of the nation’s best colleges.

Overheard:

“We found that your camp allowed our players to get that early look from these highly competitive schools that they might not gotten elsewhere. This exposure no doubt, allowed our players to get a better handle on the recruiting process as it relates to these schools.” Ken Miller, Owner Long Island Sting

Our Take:

Elite 180 focuses on exactly what Coach Carmean set out in his camp’s mission statement. Giving players the opportunity to be seen by coaches from high level academic schools (Ivy, NESCAC, Patriot) in a competitive atmosphere. Unlike some of the larger camps, like 205 or Peak 200, Elite 180 keeps their limit of campers low. If you visit their website, they provide a unique list of camp alumni, schools where players move on include, Kenyon, Dartmouth, Haverford, Bucknell, Providence, etc.

Jake Reed’s Blue Chip
UMBC, MD

Summary:

It is the premier recruiting camp for high school lacrosse players. 2009 will be the first year of Jake Reed’s Nike Blue Chip camp for rising Sophomores. Just like the Junior and Senior camps, the rising Sophomore camp will be held at UMBC. Invites are sent by the camp in the fall to players that pass a strict referral process. Acceptances are due by November 22nd, 2008. There is a 120-player limit for each session of the camp. If the invites are not accepted, additional invitations will be sent to alternates. All current invitees accept by November 22nd.

Overheard:

“If you think your son or player is good enough to play at the highest level, do everything you can to get them at this camp. Be proactive, try to get as many respected coaches as possible to lobby for your son’s spot at this camp.”

Our Take:

If you get an invitation to this camp… go. It is that simple, if you want to play at the highest level of college lacrosse, this camp is your best opportunity to impress top tier coaches by showcasing your skills against the highest level of competition. The number of total players is kept to a manageable level, so coaches are able to get a good look at each player.

New England Top 150 Lacrosse
Portsmouth Abbey, NH

Summary:

The New England Lacrosse Camp Top 150 provides the experienced high school player with excellent competition and advanced coaching techniques. Each player will have the opportunity to improve their individual techniques and tactical knowledge and to compete against strong competition. Over 50 Colleges are in attendance providing student/athletes an opportunity to meet college coaches.

Overheard:

“The camp has the best corral of Ivy and NESCAC coaches out there. They aren’t just scouting, they are getting players better. And you will see lots of high level, intelligent lacrosse players.”

Our Take:

Coach Brown puts together one of the best camps in the country for players who want to improve their game and compete at a high level. This is one of the rare recruiting camps that teach players how to become better. It also boasts a full roster of coaches from the top programs in the Northeast. Every level, D1 to D3. From UMASS, Yale, Tufts, Providence, Bryant, Vermont, Middlebury, Bates, to name a few. The coaching staff is excellent, and they care about the players and helping their game. The experience is more personal than most camps out there.

Peak 200
Springfield, MA

Summary:

The Peak 200 Lacrosse Camp is a focused, competitive program designed to provide the best possible advanced coaching and playing experience for the nation’s most exceptional secondary school players. Each player will be on a team with its own complete coaching staff and will be exposed to individual, position and team training. Emphasis will be placed on advanced techniques, tactics and strategies from some of the top coaches in the country.

Overheard:

“It is a fun camp that has good competition, good numbers and a number of scouts.”

Our Take:

Having a college coach as the coach of your team at Peak 200 gives you an opportunity to be exposed to great coaching for the entire week. Not only are you getting better, but as you play all the other teams at the camp, it also gives you the opportunity to play in front of a lot of coaches. Peak 200 also has a great “College Fair” night where each school in attendance sets up a booth and you are given time to speak with all the coaches.

Showtime Recruiting: National Recruiting Showcase
WCSU, CT

Summary:

160 of the top rising sophomores (Class 2012) and juniors (Class of 2011) with college lacrosse aspirations will compete from July 13th – July 16th, 2009 at Western Connecticut State University, in Danbury (Fairfield County), CT. Participants will have the opportunity to showcase their skills while being individually assessed during position specific instruction and game sessions. CT. Many top DI, DII, and DIII coaching staffs will be in attendance. In 2008, some of the nation’s top coaching staffs were in attendance, headlined by Johns Hopkins and Syracuse.

Overheard:

“The camp is still in its second year, so if you can go to Blue Chip, Top 205 or Blue Chip 225, you may be better off there. But Paul, Joe and Mike have lots of coaching connections and will be able to build their camp into a first choice camp for upcoming players.”

Our Take:

This camp is run by former Syracuse standouts, Paul Carcaterra, Joe Ceglia and Mike Springer. They offer invite only spots to rising Sophomores and Juniors. The camp is in its 2nd year at Western Connecticut State University. Last year’s camp drew a wide range of top-notch players from throughout the country. The lowdown on this camp is that it is a great place to be seen by some big time programs. Word is that Syracuse found 4 or 5 players who are high on their recruiting lists for the upcoming season. As mentioned above, Hopkins was also patrolling the sidelines. The camp also drew a number of D1 and top D3 programs in the tri-state area. Since the camp is only open to rising sophomores and juniors, this camp is for top players that want to play at the highest level.

Texas 99

Summary:

The camp covers the Top 99 players in the state selected by the HS coaches. Over 50 colleges were represented. Top 20 D1 schools like Harvard, Notre Dame, Yale, Towson, Ohio State, Navy, Army, Air Force, Maryland, Dartmouth and Penn State as well as developing programs like Hartford, Bellarmine and Manhattan College. Additionally, top D2 and D3 programs like Washington and Lee, Salisbury State, Merrimack College, Bates College, Bowdoin, Limestone, etc attended.

Our Take:

Coach Byrne from ND runs a very well attended camp. You can see by the schools that they list above on their website. The camp is a lifeline for strong high school players from Texas who might not have the opportunity to attend camps on the East Coast.

Top 205
College Park, MD/Towson, MD

Summary:

The original recruiting camp. It is still regarded as one of the best opportunities to be seen by the top-level coaches. They offer three sessions for players, rising juniors and two open Top 205 camp sessions. The 4 days provide players with the opportunity to go from unknown to on the tip of the coaching communities tongues with an impressive couple of days of play.

Overheard:

“Do not expect to get much individual instruction, this camp is almost all playing, but coaches are camped out on the sidelines.”

Our Take:

The camp is known as a stronghold for colleges from the South. The opportunities are there to be seen. It is the best alternative to Jake Reed’s Blue Chip camp. If you make the All Star team you are guaranteed looks from top 10 Division 1 programs.

Lacrosse Injuries Update: Video Of Professor Of Emergency Medicine Discussing Concussions


Lacrosse Defense Video: 2008 Georgetown Men’s Lacrosse Defense Review


2009 Colorado State Men’s Lacrosse Schedule


Coach Flip Naumburg: (970) 377-1390

 

OPPONENT

DATE

DAY

TIME

LOCATION/Result

Colorado College (DIII)

Feb 7

Saturday

3:25 pm

Scrimmage in Colorado Springs, CO

UC Santa Barbara

Feb 21

Saturday

7:00 pm

Neutral in San Luis Obispo, CA

Cal Poly

Feb 22

Sunday

4:00 pm

Away in San Luis Obispo, CA

Boston

Mar 1

Sunday

1:00 pm

Home

Texas A&M

Mar 6

Friday

4:00 pm

Home

Montana*

Mar 8

Sunday

1:00 pm

Home

Florida

Mar 11

Wednesday

4:00 pm

Home

Loyola Marymount

Mar 15

Sunday

1:00 pm

Away in Los Angeles, CA

Claremont

Mar 16

Monday

1:00 pm

Away in Los Angeles, CA

Chapman

Mar 18

Wednesday

7:00 pm

Away in Los Angeles, CA

Brigham Young*

Mar 20

Friday

7:00 pm

Away in Provo, UT

Utah*

Mar 22

Sunday

1:00 pm

Away in Salt Lake City, UT

Michigan

Apr 4

Saturday

8:00 pm

Away in Ann Arbor, MI

Minnesota-Duluth

Apr 5

Sunday

2:00 pm

Neutral in Ann Arbor, MI

Lindenwood

Apr 11

Saturday

12:00 pm

Home

Sonoma State

Apr 12

Sunday

1:00 pm

Home

Colorado*

Apr 18

Saturday

7:00 pm

Away at Invesco Field

Wyoming*

Apr 25

Saturday

1:00 pm

Home

Nebraska

Apr 26

Sunday

1:00 pm

Home

2009 RMLC Championship Tournament

 

Semifinals

May 1

Friday

TBD

Boulder, CO

 

Championship

May 2

Saturday

TBD

Boulder, CO

2009 MCLA Championship Tournament

 

1st Round

May 12

Tuesday

TBD

Dick’s SGP in Denver, CO

 

Quarter Finals

May 13

Wednesday

TBD

Dick’s SGP in Denver, CO

 

Semifinals

May 15

Friday

TBD

Dick’s SGP in Denver, CO

 

Championship

May 16

Saturday

TBD

Dick’s SGP in Denver, CO