Daily Archives: February 9, 2009

Lacrosse Injury Prevention: Neuromuscular Training Programs Have Seen A Reduction In “Risk Of Injury”


One neuromuscular training program in Finland designed to decrease the number of lower extremity injuries in females saw a 66% reduction in the risk of injury for participants. Young women are two to five times likelier to tear an ACL than boys in the same sport.

Each year, U.S. emergency rooms treat more than 4.3 million sports-related injuries on youngsters. Many of these injuries require multiple surgeries and excruciating recoveries. These injuries can have life-long effects on mobility—and decreased mobility worsens a host of medical conditions in older adults, including diabetes, obesity, and osteoporosis.

Consider that more than 200,000 new cases of knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur annually, costing $1 billion a year. Evidence suggests that early onset arthritis will likely develop 5 to 15 years after an ACL injury.

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090206/OPINION05/90206029&template=printart

Suddenly, ACL tears, concussions, and multiple surgeries are the norm for kids as young as 12, yet our epidemic of youth sports injuries gets little or no attention.

These injuries are preventable and simply should not happen.

I see this as both a moral and an economic issue. Each year, U.S. emergency rooms treat more than 4.3 million sports-related injuries on youngsters. Many of these injuries require multiple surgeries and excruciating recoveries. These injuries can have life-long effects on mobility—and decreased mobility worsens a host of medical conditions in older adults, including diabetes, obesity, and osteoporosis.

This costs taxpayers billions. Consider that more than 200,000 new cases of knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur annually, costing $1 billion a year. Evidence suggests that early onset arthritis will likely develop 5 to 15 years after an ACL injury.

This public health threat will worsen unless we force immediate changes in our athletic training system.

The good news is research shows that those changes work: simple neuromuscular training programs drastically reduce youth injuries, and an ounce of prevention goes a long way. Proper coaching, training programs, hydration, officiating, equipment, medical coverage at sporting events, and preseason physical exams reduce injuries exponentially. Educational, behavioral, environmental, and enforcement/legislative interventions have been developed, and something as easy as the right shoe for different playing surfaces can prevent serious injury.

There is no one person or entity to blame for the epidemic of disabling injuries in youngsters—the system itself needs fixing and the sources of the problems are numerous and complex.

Young athletes feel pressure from parents, peers, coaches, TV ads and themselves. We need to encourage athletes to dream, but our first obligation is to protect from damage the 30 million kids who participate in organized sports.

An incredible 30 to 50% of youth sports injuries are caused by overuse—kids are simply worked too hard. Little League set limits on the number of pitches young players may throw, and the sky has not fallen on baseball. All youth leagues should set sensible limits on practice times.

Related to overuse is improper use of the body. Running, jumping, throwing, and landing, if done with poor form, take an enormous toll on young bodies. But again, research shows that simple prevention and training programs work. One neuromuscular training program in Finland designed to decrease the number of lower extremity injuries in females saw a 66% reduction in the risk of injury for participants. Young women are two to five times likelier to tear an ACL than boys in the same sport.

Finally, children are more vulnerable to permanent damage than adults. A high school athlete’s recovery time from concussion is longer than a college athlete’s, and high school athletes are three times likelier to sustain a second concussion. If we remain on our current course, musculoskeletal disabilities in youngsters will increase dramatically over the next 20 years.

If we want our children to bring home ribbons instead of broken ribs, the long-term scientific research must continue. But the grass roots prevention must start at home and on the school and neighborhood courts, fields and arenas from which our youngsters are being carted away —- not on the shoulders of teammates, but on stretchers.

Rondald Zernicke is the director of the University of Michigan Bone & Joint Injury Prevention & Rehabilitation Center, professor in the Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Biomedical Engineering and the School of Kinesiology at U-M.

 

UC Santa Barbara Men’s Lacrosse Defeats USC 13-6 As Trojans Start Strong


ucsantabarbaramenslacrosseuscSanta Barbara struggled to find their rhythm against an energetic USC squad until Patrick Sullivan put away the equalizer off of a feed from Brendan Sindell ending the quarter even at 2–2.

http://www.ucsblax.com/

The Gauchos opened the 2009 season at home with a 13–6 win against tough Division opponent, the USC Trojans. Due to heavy rains earlier in the week, the game was moved to the turf at Rob Field.

 

USC came out of the gates looking to set the tone early. A UCSB penalty opened the scoring for the Trojans three minutes into the first period. Nate Wellin answered for the Gauchos at the 10 minute mark but USC pulled ahead again a few minutes later. Santa Barbara struggled to find their rhythm against an energetic USC squad until Patrick Sullivan put away the equalizer off of a feed from Brendan Sindell ending the quarter even at 2–2.

The second quarter was marked by an offensive breakout from the Gauchos, who tallied five goals off 20 shots. Ryan Sanders scored a man-up goal, assisted by Sindell, at one minute into the period to put UCSB ahead 3–2. USC answered right back to even the score at 3 goals apiece. From there, Santa Barbara went on a 4–0 run with goals from Sanders, Sindell, George Granelli and Brandon Johnson to close the half at 7–3.

The third quarter started out with a Sindell strike at the 10 minute mark. USC responded with a surge of energy, closing the gap with a goal a minute later. The Gauchos then had an uncommon “own goal” before finding a rhythm with scores from Granelli and Sullivan to end the quarter 10–5.

The Gauchos added three more in the fourth quarter from Sindell, Sanders and freshman Kyle Johnson before a late strike by USC to end the game at 13–6. Newcomer Oisin Lewis was exceptional at the face-off square winning 17 draws on the day.

With a Division win and great start to the season, the Gauchos head to Stanford next weekend to play in the PAC 10 tournament.

Whittier Men’s Lacrosse Opens 2009 Season With 15-5 Victory Over Grand Canyon University


WhittierLACROSSEThe Whittier College men’s lacrosse team opened its season on the road in the Grand Canyon State at Grand Canyon University and came away with a 15-5 win for the program’s second consecutive opening day victory.

 

The Poets (1-0) scored eight first half goals and took an 8-2 advantage into the intermission. Anthony Lackey paced Whittier as he scored a game-high four goals and added one assist.

Daniel McQuade and Mitch Prickett he scored two goals and had two assists in the win.

The purple and gold added to its lead in the third quarter with a six goal effort and tacked on one final insurance score in the fourth quarter en route to the 10 goal win.

Goalie Ben Brown had nine saves which includues three in the final frame.

Grand Canyon (0-1) goalie Andrew Hunter had 21 saves in the loss.

Whittier next plays in its annual Alumni Game on Saturday, February 14, at 5 p.m. The Poets’ next regular season game is on Wednesday, February 18, against Southern Maine at 4 pm.

http://insidelacrosse.com/page.cfm?pagerid=2&news=fdetail&storyid=197228