Daily Archives: February 15, 2009

Cal Berkeley Women’s Lacrosse Falls To #3 Duke 19-7 On Sunday


“Duke’s attack was very potent,” Cal head coach calberkeleywomenslacrosse1Theresa Sherry said. “We felt a level of play that we hadn’t seen all that often in the past. No. 1, as far as game tempo and momentum, you can’t let a team get up on you 9-0. We spent the rest of the game digging ourselves out of that hole. It was our first really big test. It’s good to see what we still need to work on. Morgan Dyson had a fabulous game, but we needed to back her up in terms of taking care of the ball in midfield and in the attack and also in all-around discipline on all ends of the field.”

http://calbears.cstv.com/sports/w-lacros/recaps/021509aaa.html

California fell against No. 3 Duke, 19-7, on Sunday at the University of Denver‘s Peter Barton Lacrosse Stadium. The Golden Bears’ record evens out at 1-1 after the non-conference loss, while the Blue Devils now have a 2-0 record.

Senior attacker Sam Price (2 goals), senior midfielder Elizabeth “T” Jahp (1 goal, 1 assist) and freshman Lauren Johnson (2 goals) led Cal with two points each. Bears senior goalkeeper Morgan Dyson made 11 saves in 60 minutes.

The Blue Devils’ Carolyn Cryer (3 goals, 5 assists) led all scorers with eight points.

“Duke’s attack was very potent,” Cal head coach Theresa Sherry said. “We felt a level of play that we hadn’t seen all that often in the past. No. 1, as far as game tempo and momentum, you can’t let a team get up on you 9-0. We spent the rest of the game digging ourselves out of that hole. It was our first really big test. It’s good to see what we still need to work on. Morgan Dyson had a fabulous game, but we needed to back her up in terms of taking care of the ball in midfield and in the attack and also in all-around discipline on all ends of the field.”

The Blue Devils rolled out to its 9-0 lead 11:05 into the first half, with Cryer, Lindsay Gilbride, Carolyn Davis and Megan Del Monte scoring two goals each and Sarah Bullard adding one.

Cal scored three of the last four goals of the half on eight-meter shots. Jahp converted hers at 16:40 and Johnson, a product of nearby Englewood, Colo., finished her free-position attempts at 22:53 and 27:20.

Lauren Johnson really stepped up for us today,” Sherry said. “I talked to her about taking care of the ball, and she really followed the game plan, finished on eight-meter shots and ran the field very well. I’m happy for her to step up for us in her hometown.”

The Bears trailed, 10-3, at halftime.

Duke regained momentum to start the second half, as Gilbride, who finished with four goals and one assist, scored the first two goals of the half. Junior midfielder Alex Tickner (33:16) scored Cal‘s lone goal during a 6-1 Duke run that left the Blue Devils ahead, 16-4.

Another Bears freshman, midfielder Vail Horn, converted an eight-meter shot at 49:04 and Price, assisted by Jahp, scored at 50:56 to make the score 16-6.

Duke scored the next three goals before Price, off junior midfielder Alyse Kennedy’s assist, scored the game’s final goal at 59:07.

Cal next plays host to Albany at noon on Friday, Feb. 20, in its home opener in Berkeley and then welcomes No. 2 Syracuse at noon on Sunday, Feb. 22, to Memorial Stadium.

GAME SUMMARY

            1     2     F
Duke        10    9     19
California  3     4     7

Duke Scoring
Goals:
Lindsay Gilbride 4; Carolyn Davis 4; Caroline Cryer 3; Megan Del Monte 3; Kat Thomas 2; Sarah Bullard 2; Kim Wenger 1. Assists: Caroline Cryer 5; Megan Del Monte 2; Emma Hamm 2; Lindsay Gilbride 1; Betsey Sauer 1.

California Scoring
Goals:
Lauren Johnson 2; Sam Price 2; Elizabeth “T” Jahp 1; Vail Horn 1; Alex Tickner 1. Assists: Alyse Kennedy 1; Elizabeth “T” Jahp 1.

Goalkeeping
Duke:
Kim Imbesi, 6 saves, 6 GA, 51:35; Mollie Mackler, 4 saves, 1 GA, 8:25. California: Morgan Dyson, 11 saves, 19 GA, 60:00.

Records: California 1-1 (1-0 MPSF). Duke 2-0 (0-0 ACC).

 

University Of Denver Falls To North Carolina 20-7 In Chapel Hill, N.C.


denvermenslacrosseuncThe No. 15 University of Denver men’s lacrosse team (0-1) fell to the North Carolina Tar Heels (2-0) 20-7 on the road in Chapel Hill, N.C., in front of a crowd of 1,243 fans at Fetzer Field.

http://www.denverpioneers.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=90265&SPID=10874&DB_OEM_ID=18600&ATCLID=3670477

The No. 15 University of Denver men’s lacrosse team (0-1) fell to the North Carolina Tar Heels (2-0) 20-7 on the road in Chapel Hill, N.C., in front of a crowd of 1,243 fans at Fetzer Field.

 The Pioneers were led by senior Joey Murray’s (Denver, Colo.) three goals and one assist for four points, while freshman Mark Matthews (Oshawa, Ontario) added two goals and one assist for three points. Also contributing for Denver was junior Charley Dickenson (Dallas, Texas) and sophomore Andrew Lay (Denver, Colo.) as both added a goal apiece. Sophomore Jamie Lincoln (St. Catharines, Ontario) grabbed his first points of the season as he registered an assist on the Pioneers’ second goal of the game.

 

The Tar Heels opened the scoring in the first period as they scored six goals in the first 11 minutes of action, including one goal with a one-man advantage at the 8:06 mark. The Pioneers were able to add their first goal of the game with 3:37 remaining in the first as Murray scored an unassisted goal, his first of the season.

 

Just seconds into the second period, the Pioneers added their second goal of the game as Matthews scored his first goal of the season with a man-up advantage. Denver then added three more in a span of two minutes to cut UNC’s advantage to 6-5 with the help of goals from Lay, Mathews and Murray. UNC would not go away though and added two goals in 16 seconds to take an 8-5 lead. The Pioneers were the last to score during the second period as Murray added his third of the game with 5:34 remaining.

 

UNC exploded in the third and fourth periods, scoring 12 goals and hold Denver to just one goal in the final 3 minutes of action in the fourth period as Dickenson scored his first of the season.

 

The Pioneers continue on the road as they head to Albany, N.Y. to take on Albany on Saturday, Feb. 21 at 11 a.m. (MT).

 

 

Oregon Ducks Women’s Lacrosse Defeats UC Davis 13-6


 

 

oregonwomenslacrosse2The Oregon lacrosse team defeated UC Davis, 13-6, on Saturday at Papé Field, giving the Ducks their first win of the 2009 season.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.registerguard.com/csp/cms/sites/web/sports/7697652-41/1-1-DUCKS-GOALS-LACROSSE-OREGON.csp

 

Alex Breiner had three goals and one assist for Oregon (1-1), while Catherine Davidson had two goals and two assists and Ilsa van den Berg also scored a pair.

The Ducks led 10-2 at halftime. They scored eight straight at one point in the first half, breaking a 1-1 tie.

 

Lacrosse Injuries: ACL Tears Are Surgically Repaired And Rehabbed; Women Athletes “Are Up To Eight Times More Prone To An ACL Tear Than Men”


aclteararthroscopeThe National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) says some studies show women are up to eight times more prone to an ACL tear than men.

They drill a hole between the tibia and femur and insert a guide rod. Once the rod is inserted, the graft will be pulled through the holes and get stapled or screwed in to keep it in place.

 

http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/article/20090214/HSSPORTS/902140311

Tearing an anterior cruciate ligament isn’t the same kind of “death sentence” it used to be for athletes.

The ACL is the most important of four main ligaments that connect the bones of the knee joint, and with advances in medicine, athletes are coming back much faster than they used to from ACL injuries.

And for certain reasons, women are more likely than men to suffer an ACL tear.

The National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) says some studies show women are up to eight times more prone to an ACL tear than men.

Doctors can’t prove why women are more prone to ACL injuries but they suspect several reasons, including anatomy, hormones, and muscle-use.

In a recent CNN.com article, orthopedic surgeon John Xerogeanes says there is a huge increase in ACL injuries when you compare female to male athletes.

“We’ve looked at a million different things in terms of size of the pelvis, angulation of the knees, hormones and the way girls fire their muscles when they play hard. We’re not exactly sure why this happens,” said Xerogeanes, who is the chief of sports medicine at the Emory Orthopaedic and Spine Center in Atlanta.

How a tear occurs

ACL tears occur when the lower leg is planted and the upper body twists away. A tear can also happen with sudden contact to the knee. A patient will usually hear a pop when the ACL is injured.

Usually, when an ACL tear occurs, there is more damage done to the knee. A meniscus is frequently torn at the same time an ACL tear occurs. The menisicus is a type of cartilage that acts as a shock absorber within the knee and helps spread the weight load.

Patients can usually walk with an ACL tear, but the only solution to permanetly fix the ACL is to have surgery. If a person wishes to lead an active life, then surgery is going to be required.

ACL injuries are more common in sports with sudden cuts and twists such as soccer, football, basketball and gymnastics.

How it’s repaired

To repair a torn ACL surgery is required. Doctors will usually harvest a tendon from the patients body, which is called an autograft, or depending on the doctor’s preference will harvest a tendon from a cadaver (allograft).

They drill a hole between the tibia and femur and insert a guide rod. Once the rod is inserted, the graft will be pulled through the holes and get stapled or screwed in to keep it in place.

Recovery for an ACL injuries can take about six months, but can vary from patient to patient.

What the ACL does

The ACL is one of four strong ligaments connecting the bones of the knee joint. It also the ligament that is most often injured. The other main knee ligaments are the posterior cruciate ligament, and the lateral and medical collateral ligaments.

The ACL provides stability to the knee and minimizes stress across the knee joint. It also restricts excessive forward movement of the tibia.

Rehab

A doctor of physical therapist will design a rehab program that takes into consideration a patient’s normal level of activity, physical fitness and extent of the ACL injury.

A rehab program should include flexibility exercises, strengthening exercises, endurance exercises and coordination and agility training.

The muscles in the injured led should be as strong as the uninjured leg before a patient should return to normal physical activities.