Daily Archives: February 21, 2009

Stanford Women’s Lacrosse Loses To #3 Syracuse 15-10 In Strong Effort Against Elite Team


Stanford (3-1) fell behind by five goals, but made up the deficit within a 10-minute span late of the stanfordwomenslacrossefoardfirst half on the sticks of five different scorers, tying the game at 8-8 on Leslie Foard’s score with 1:50 left.

It was the second meeting between the teams, with Syracuse winning both, and the first of seven games against teams ranked in the Top 20 coaches’ poll. This was one of six against teams ranked in the top 11. The other five are on the road.

 http://gostanford.cstv.com/sports/w-lacros/recaps/022009aaa.html 

Stanford showed it had the talent and the game to play with the nation’s elite, but was unable to get the result to prove it.

No. 3 Syracuse pulled away in the second half to beat the No. 17 Cardinal, 15-10, in a non conference women’s lacrosse match up between ranked teams Friday afternoon at Laird Q. Cagan Stadium.

Stanford (3-1) fell behind by five goals, but made up the deficit within a 10-minute span late of the first half on the sticks of five different scorers, tying the game at 8-8 on Leslie Foard’s score with 1:50 left.

But Christina Dove scored three goals and Katie Rowan two as the Orange (2-0) responded with six unanswered goals. Syracuse came close to shutting out Stanford in the second half, until Ashley Aruffo and Maggie Sachs cut the deficit in the final 1:21.

Dove scored four goals and Rowan three for Syracuse. Stanford was led by Foard and Lauren Schmidt with two apiece.

“We really fought to play with a team of that caliber,” Stanford coach Amy Bokker said.

“To be in the game is a real positive in knowing where we are as a team.”

The first half was an up-and-down affair, in which both teams took advantage of penalties to score on extra-man opportunities. Stanford also scored three first-half goals on free-position shots – by Lauren Schmidt, Maris Perlman and Karen Nesbitt.

But the second half was played at a deliberate pace. Syracuse controlled the tempo not only with its effective slow-down play, but continued to regain possession by earning the majority of draw controls after its goals.

“We knew they had a high-powered offense, and we needed to come up big on offense,” Bokker said. “The biggest thing was the draw controls. They were able to keep possession.”

Though Syracuse posed a big and athletic lineup, Bokker felt Stanford matched the Orange in team speed.

“We had opportunities,” Bokker said. “I think we were a little rushed in our offensive end. We could have been more patient in working through the defense.”

It was the second meeting between the teams, with Syracuse winning both, and the first of seven games against teams ranked in the Top 20 coaches’ poll. This was one of six against teams ranked in the top 11. The other five are on the road.

Lacrosse Recruiting: Trend Among NCAA Div. I Men’s Lacrosse Programs Is Recruiting Lacrosse Student-Athletes As Early As Freshman (In High School)


johnshopkinslacrosseIn some respects, lacrosse recruiting is worse than big-time college football and basketball because the sport is played in the spring. At least football and basketball players get to play through their senior seasons in high school. Because lacrosse is played in the spring, senior seasons are basically worthless, so the hunt for talent begins during sophomore and junior seasons.

 

“The young kids haven’t thought about it,” Crawford said. “They think about college in a nebulous, almost abstract way. They don’t think about the right things: if the college is the right fit academically or if it is the right fit socially. They don’t think about if it is the right fit financially or geographically.”

http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/college/lacrosse/bal-sp.preston21feb21,0,3883173,print.column

 

One day soon, the Division I lacrosse powers might be recruiting middle school players.

It sounds impossible, but unless the NCAA does something soon, that’s where lacrosse is headed. Loyola High coach Jack Crawford and Boys’ Latin coach Bobby Shriver say recruiting is one of the sport’s biggest problems.

“It’s gotten out of hand,” Shriver said.

In some respects, lacrosse recruiting is worse than big-time college football and basketball because the sport is played in the spring. At least football and basketball players get to play through their senior seasons in high school. Because lacrosse is played in the spring, senior seasons are basically worthless, so the hunt for talent begins during sophomore and junior seasons.

What’s next, freshmen?

Don’t laugh. An assistant coach at a traditional lacrosse power told me recently that he had to turn away a freshman player who wanted to commit early. The traditional “Junior Day” visits on college campuses are being replaced by “Sophomore Day.”

It’s getting crazy.

The two suspects usually blamed for this recruiting madness are Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala and Virginia‘s Dom Starsia. North Carolina‘s Joe Breschi has joined the list because of the rash of oral commitments he received last summer from rising juniors.

There really is no need for Starsia or Pietramala to recruit so early. When they talk to a recruit, few programs command as much immediate respect. But other schools have to keep pace with them.

There is no end to the madness because everybody has to play the game, from the college coaches to club coaches.

It’s easy to point fingers at Pietramala and Starsia, but they aren’t doing anything illegal. They are just taking advantage of the opportunity provided by the system. The only real group that can do something is the NCAA, and the solution is simple: Don’t allow recruiting until the start of a player’s senior season. It would create a more level playing field and allow the players to mature mentally and physically.

That’s the major gripe from Shriver and Crawford. Tenth-graders are just getting their driver’s licenses. They still have pimples and are more concerned with the latest clothing style or dance step than college.

“The young kids haven’t thought about it,” Crawford said. “They think about college in a nebulous, almost abstract way. They don’t think about the right things: if the college is the right fit academically or if it is the right fit socially. They don’t think about if it is the right fit financially or geographically.”

Shriver is also concerned about the pressure on the athletes. He points out that some players develop later than others and those who don’t commit early feel pressured because they aren’t sure whether there will be scholarships available. Even those who commit early feel pressure because if they don’t take the scholarship when it’s offered, somebody else will.

“It’s hard for kids to be patient when a player sees a sophomore or junior being heavily recruited,” Shriver said. “This started happening about 10 years ago. I don’t see Starsia or Pietramala as the culprits. They are no different than the rest of us. Actually, you have to give them credit. They recognized opportunity, and then it started snowballing.”

Lacrosse recruiting is like the economy. It’s going to get worse before it gets better. Lacrosse parents like to believe the sport is on the same level as major college basketball and football. They believe there is an endless amount of scholarship money to fund the sport.

You often hear parents claim their son is on a full scholarship, but in fact, most are fortunate to receive only a few thousand dollars a year.

High school coaches are aware of the situation. Because of the early oral commitments, we’ll see more and more players changing their minds later. That’s because of the early pressure, pressure that really isn’t needed. All the NCAA has to do is stand up and move back the recruiting date.

It would even the playing field and make a tough decision easier for a bunch of young players.

Cal Berkeley Women’s Lacrosse Defeats Albany 14-9; #3 Syracuse Next


calberkeleywomenslacrosse11California defeated Albany, 14-9, in the Golden Bears’ home opener on Friday afternoon at Memorial Stadium. Cal freshman midfielder Vail Horn led all scorers with a career-high five goals and senior attacker Sam Price scored four. The Bears’ record improved to 2-1 after the non-conference win. Albany fell to 1-2.

 

“It was fun to get a win in our first home game,”

Cal head coach Theresa Sherry said. “Our attack came out and looked good in the first half, scoring 10 goals. Were still demanding more from our defense, to allow fewer goals, but Albany is a tough team. They have a lot of threats on the attack. We had a tough time stopping No. 18 [Kayla Best] and some of their other one-on-one challengers.”

 

Best, who is on a 33-game scoring streak, led Albany with four goals.

 

The Great Danes have just played Mountain Pacific Sports Federation opponents, including Saint Mary’s (a 14-9 win) and Stanford (a 15-10 loss), so far this season.

Horn had previously set her career goalscoring high (4 goals) in the season-opening 19-0 rout of Fresno State. She currently ranks second in scoring at Cal with 10 goals. Price leads the Bears with 13 points (10 goals, 3 assists).

 

“Vail did well,” Sherry said. “That’s what she’s capable of. Four goals in the first half. Could she have duplicated that in the second half? We had to get her some rest because she does a lot for us on both ends of the field. We had to give her a little time to relax.”

 

The Bears’ starting lineup featured three freshmen: Horn, defender Melissa Sheehan and attacker Tara Arolla. Cal started four newcomers overall, including sophomore transfer Molly Everett.

 

“The freshmen have been stepping up very well,” Sherry said. “Tori Harrison came in today. Tara Arolla had at least one goal. Melissa Sheehan has been a major factor in our defense, and I think that’s very important to the overall culture of the team. That’s something we’re going to need down the road. We’re going to need them to continue to step up and not play like freshmen.”

 

Cal broke out to a 3-0 first half lead on goals by Price, junior midfielder Alex Tickner and junior midfielder Alyse Kennedy. Best scored the Great Danes’ first goal at the 5:20 mark. Cal led, 3-1.

 

After Mel Rorie cut the Albany deficit to one goal with a strike at 9:18, Sherry took a timeout. Horn then scored her first goal at 10:49 to give Cal a 4-2 lead. Best scored again at 15:12 to make the score 4-3.

 

The Bears created another two-goal cushion on a goal by senior midfielder Ghillie Little on a nice feed from junior midfielder Alyse Kennedy. Albany crept within one goal yet again when Best scored an eight-meter goal to make the score 5-4 at 18:18.

 

Cal responded quickly on Horn’s second goal, which moved Cal ahead 6-4 at 18:30. Less than one minute later, Jodi Battaglia struck, and the Bears led, 6-5, at 19:11.

But that was the closest the Great Danes would get the rest of the game. Cal reeled off the last four goals of the half, with Horn scoring her third off an eight-meter shot at 21:18 and her fourth off an assist by Little at 25:00. Little, off an assist by freshman attacker Tara Arolla at 29:14, and Price each scored one, with Price scoring as time expired in the first half.

 

The Bears led, 10-5, at the break.

 

The second 30-minute period was a much more defensive-minded half, as each team scored four goals. Cal scored the first goal of the half, off Arolla’s unassisted effort at 34:45, and Albany‘s Christine Grueniger scored at 39:14. The Bears led, 11-5.

 

The teams traded goals three more times until Cal wound up with the 14-9 victory.

Cal next hosts 2008 NCAA semifinalist and third-ranked Syracuse at 12 p.m. on Sunday at Memorial Stadium.

http://insidelacrosse.com/page.cfm?pagerid=2&news=fdetail&storyid=197790

 

University Of Oregon Women’s Lacrosse Loses To #9 North Carolina 15-7


oregonwomenslacrosse4The University of Oregon women’s lacrosse team fell to No. 9 North Carolina, 15-7, on Friday at Fetzer Field.

 

Jenn Russell had four goals and an assist for Carolina, which improves to 5-0 all-time against the Ducks.Oregon (1-2) with two goals in the loss.Carolina followed with two more quick goals by Russell (unassisted at 27:10) and Megan Bosica with 25:43 left in the half.

 

Freshman Becky Lynch scored with 23:02 to go to make it 4-0 before Chelsea Parks scored to make it 5-0 and force a UO timeout less than midway through the first half.Oregon responded with an unassisted goal by Alicia Burkhart at 14:39, cutting the lead to 5-1, but Russell’s second goal just 28 seconds later gave momentum back to the home team.

 

Carolina, but the Tar Heels ended the period on a 4-1 run to take a commanding 10=3 lead at the break.9 a.m. PT) at Stony Brook (0-2).

Alicia Burkhart led UNC (2-0) wasted little time taking control of the game, scoring at the 28:57 mark on a Corey Donohoe shot.

 

Casey Rector scored UO’s second goal, taking a pass from Bina Barrett to make it 6-2

The two sides played closer in the second half, but the early hole proved too deep for the Ducks to dig out of.

UO also received single goals from Alex Breiner, Catherine Davidson and Ilsa van den Berg in the loss.

The Ducks will wrap up their first road trip of the season on Sunday (

QUACK TRACKS: Oregon was without JR M Sarah MacDonald for the first time this season … MacDonald was injured in UO’s win over UC Davis on Feb. 14 and will likely be out of action for the next few weeks … Both of Oregon’s losses in ’09 have come to top 20 opponents … The Ducks’ next home game is Friday, March 6 vs. MPSF foe Fresno State on Pape’ Field (7 p.m.).

 

http://www.goducks.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=4427&SPID=251&ATCLID=3674870&DB_OEM_ID=500