Daily Archives: July 11, 2009

Injuries In Lacrosse: Boys And Girls Lacrosse Players 14 Years And Younger Suffer More Injuries During Practices Than Games And Remain Vulnerable Due To Immature Bones, Lack Of Proper Rest, And Poor Training And Conditioning


Most of these injuries occur during unorganized or informal sports activities, with 30 percent of parents reporting their child has been injured while playing a team sport. Half of them say their child has been injured more than once. Photo by LaxBuzz

Most of these injuries occur during unorganized or informal sports activities, with 30 percent of parents reporting their child has been injured while playing a team sport. Half of them say their child has been injured more than once. Photo by LaxBuzz

 
Most organized sports-related injuries occur during practices rather than games. Most sports injuries in kids can be attributed to immature bones, insufficient rest after injury, and poor training or conditioning.
 
During the teenage years, girls are more likely to suffer sports injuries than boys. Experts attribute the tendency to increased estrogen — which adds fat rather than muscle and makes ligaments lax — as well as the less-flexed, more upright running position of girls. In addition, because of wider hips, girls are more likely to be knock-kneed (Source: New York Times).
 Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans (JOCD) occurs in young people when their growth plates haven’t closed yet. The condition causes a piece of bone and the piece of cartilage that covers it to come loose and float around inside a joint like the knee.

JOCD usually affects active children and young adolescents. Although it can lead to arthritis, children with the condition normally do very well long-term. Symptoms including joint “locking,” stiffness and swelling.

Treatment for JOCD usually involves rest and casting, but kids with chronic JOCD or a large affected area may need surgery (Source: Children’s Memorial Hospital Institute for Sports Medicine).

A recent study in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons says with conservative treatment alone, 50 percent of children with JOCD will heal to form a normal knee in adulthood.

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the knee’s four main ligaments. A sudden, abrupt change in force to the knee can cause it to tear, and unfortunately, the ligament has virtually no capacity to heal itself once torn.

Because of the ligament’s inability to heal, surgeons repair the tear by substituting a nearby tendon — such as from the hamstring — for the damaged one. Because this type of surgery involves going through the growth plates of the leg bone and thigh bone, it can cause growth of the leg to slow.

For this reason, doctors usually recommend a patient wait until they reach near skeletal maturity to undergo ACL reconstruction surgery.

http://www.news8austin.com/content/headlines/?ArID=245950&SecID=2

Adidas National Lacrosse Classic: Rochester Defeats Washington DC 5-2 To Win 2009 Championship


adidasnationallacrosseclassic

Inside Lacrosse

The hold that central/upstate New York has on lacrosse tightened a little more at the adidas National Lacrosse Classic on Wednesday and Thursday at the Maryland Soccerplex in Germantown, Md., about 30 minutes north of Washington, DC.

Rochester, coached by brothers Craig and Andrew Whipple, won the championship for the second consecutive year following a 5-2 victory over Washington DC in the championship on Thursday afternoon.

Rochester won its seven games by a combined 53 goals.

Rochester midfielder Randy Staats, a rising junior from Canada, finished with two goals and two assists in the championship game.

The 20-team tournament featured players from 28 states.

Those states were Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin.

It also drew more than 40 coaches from Divisions I, II and III and MCLA.

The tournament was comprised primarily of rising seniors and juniors.

Rochester advanced to the semifinals with scores that included 20-1, 14-0, 12-2 and 12-1.

That trend continued in the semifinals. Rochester took the game’s first eight shots and easily defeated Boston, 16-2.

Unofficially, attackman Brendan Saylor (Fairport) scored four goals and attackman Ty Thompson (Salmon River Central) added three.

Attackman Sean Shakespeare (Noble & Greenough) scored both goals for Boston.

Meantime, Washington advanced with a strong defense — it gave up 21 goals to reach the championship.

The defense featured Ned Bowden (Collegiate), Ryan Gillooly (St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes), Teddy Manders (Gonzaga), Connor McCeney (Westfield), Richard Pastorino (St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes) and Kiel Wiegmann (Landon), plus LSMs Grant Lowenfeld (Georgetown Prep) and Charles Schreck (St. Anne’s-Belfield) and goalies Austin Geisler (St. Anne’s-Belfield) and Will Joyce (Landon).

Washington advanced to the championship with a 7-3 victory over Baltimore-Prep, a team of MIAA players, in the semfinals. Unofficially, attackman Patrick Keena (Landon) had two goals and one assist and attackman James Shuler (Flint Hill) added three assists.

The championship was tied at 1 after Torin Varn (Ithaca) and Harrison Archer (Landon) traded goals.

But Staats figured in the final four goals for Rochester. He had two assists to end the first half and two goals in the second. Keena scored Washington DC’s second and final goal, on an assist from David Solomon (St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes).

As befitting a team that has won the past two championships, Rochester was clearly well-coached. Almost all of its clears were on the side opposite of the substitution box; they then got the ball quickly to the attack and to ‘x’.

At least one DI coach remarked on how unselfish the team was — making the extra pass and, in some cases, the extra two passes.

http://blogs.insidelacrosse.com/2009/07/10/rochester-wins-adidas-national-lacrosse-classic/

Western College Men’s Lacrosse: Colorado State Men’s Lacrosse Coach Flip Naumburg Steps Down As Changes Brought About By Growth Of Western Lacrosse Continue


“The thing that brought me to CSU in 1996 was my desire to make a real program out of a club team,” he said.  “I thought the potential to build a real organization from something that was more or less

Colorado State Men's Lacrosse Coach Flip Naumburg had a 208-52 overall win-loss record (80% win percentage), multiple national and conference championships, national Coach of the Year honors in 1999 and three RMLC Coach of the Year awards.  Capping it all, he was inducted into the Colorado Lacrosse Hall of Fame in the fall of 2006 – a well-earned feat for the trend-setting coach.

Colorado State Men's Lacrosse Coach Flip Naumburg had a 208-52 overall win-loss record (80% win percentage), multiple national and conference championships, national Coach of the Year honors in 1999 and three RMLC Coach of the Year awards. Capping it all, he was inducted into the Colorado Lacrosse Hall of Fame in the fall of 2006 – a well-earned feat for the trend-setting coach.

nothing more than a bunch of guys getting together to play was the driving force for me, and it continued to be that force as we climbed and grew.  I think we made strides to the point where people often thought of us the same way they think of a Division I program and that was and is a source of pride for me.”

After fourteen years on the job, Flip Naumburg will step down as head coach of Colorado State University men’s lacrosse this summer.  Since 1996, Naumburg has patrolled the sidelines of the Green and Gold, leading his team to a record four Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association national championships and six Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Conference titles.  Following a tumultuous spring season in 2009, Naumburg says his decision was made “in the spirit of trying to do what is right for CSU lacrosse.”

When Naumburg first took over as head coach, CSU lacrosse was just another club lacrosse team.  That was part of his draw to the program. “The thing that brought me to CSU in 1996 was my desire to make a real program out of a club team,” he said.  “I thought the potential to build a real organization from something that was more or less nothing more than a bunch of guys getting together to play was the driving force for me, and it continued to be that force as we climbed and grew.  I think we made strides to the point where people often thought of us the same way they think of a Division I program and that was and is a source of pride for me.”

As head coach, Naumburg said, “It has been my goal to always point the program toward the place that it needed to be.”

In his wake, he will leave behind a multitude of accomplishments that includes a 208-52 overall win-loss record (80% win percentage), multiple national and conference championships, national Coach of the Year honors in 1999 and three RMLC Coach of the Year awards.  Capping it all, he was inducted into the Colorado Lacrosse Hall of Fame in the fall of 2006 – a well-earned feat for the trend-setting coach.

Naumburg has also had a drastic impact on the broader lacrosse community for many decades.  In 1973, he co-founded the Vail Lacrosse Shootout, one of the largest and longest running lacrosse tournaments in the world.  Additionally, he founded Rock-It Pocket in 1987 and is still the owner of the custom-strung pocket company.  Naumburg will remain actively involved with both ventures, in addition to owning Colorado Lacrosse and Co. – a lacrosse-only retail store in Fort Collins, CO. 

The decision by Naumburg to step down as head coach is by no means a farewell to the Colorado State lacrosse program and he will remain a large part of the family by offering assistance to his successor, long-time assistant coach Alex Smith.  He will continue to work with the team whenever his guidance is needed.

“The decision to step back came from me thinking that it was Alex’s time,” said Naumburg.  “I have been grooming him for this for a few years, and when I took my sabbatical this past season it really became his team in many ways.  The decision is a bittersweet one as I have loved coaching these guys so much, and I also felt like it was the thing I was meant to do in life.”

Smith led the Rams to a 7-2 record during Naumburg’s leave of absence, and continued to have a large role even upon his return. 

“Flip is a great friend and mentor,” commented Smith on his predecessor.  “He has taught me everything I know about lacrosse and a lot about life as well.  His accomplishments speak for themselves.  CSU lacrosse has been around for a long time, but not until he got here did we really make strides as a program both on and off the field.”

The Rams will continue to be in good hands with Smith in place as head coach.  He came to CSU as a student looking to play lacrosse, and left as one of the best goalies the program has seen.  Since joining the lacrosse program at CSU, he has been a part of all four national championships as a player or as a coach.  He is one of the few non-varsity players to make a professional lacrosse roster, where he has been a goaltender for the Denver Outlaws of Major League Lacrosse since 2006.

Even with all those accomplishments, he understands he has big shoes to fill.  “It’s not so much about replacing Flip, because that would be impossible,” he noted.  “It’s about moving forward in a positive direction with a program that he has built from virtually ground up.  We have a great core returning for 2010 and a lot of freshmen coming in that should make this a very exciting season.  I’m honored to have the opportunity to work with Flip as our program continues to evolve.”

http://insidelacrosse.com/page.cfm?pagerid=2&news=fdetail&storyid=208192