Monthly Archives: August 2009

Lacrosse Training Drills (Video): “Three-Person Passing” Drill From US Lacrosse And S3 Training


US Lacrosse has partnered with S3 Training to bring you lacrosse conditioning and drills. Here, Kevin Atkinson stages a simple, yet effective passing drill.

Major League Lacrosse (MLL): Boston Cannon Midfielder Paul Rabil Was 2009 MLL Most Valuable Player And Will Be Featured In Championship Weekend Semifinal Game Against Denver Outlaws This Weekend


LaxPowerMajor League Lacrosse announced Thursday that Boston Cannon midfielder Paul Rabil has been selected as the 2009 Bud Light MLL Most Valuable Player, according to Commissioner David Gross. The award was based on the votes submitted by the head coaches and general manager of each of the League’s six teams.

This marks the fourth consecutive year that the Bud Light MVP winner is also the Warrior Offensive Player of the Year. It was announced yesterday that Rabil had earned the Warrior Offensive Player of the Year award. Rabil graduated from Johns Hopkins in 2008 as the school’s all-time leader in goals and assists for a midfielder.

This season, Rabil was named as the Bud Light Game MVP twice during the regular season. The first of which came in week three against the Chicago Machine when he opened up the game with a two-point goal. In week six, he punished the Washington Bayhawks with a nine-point game, helping the Cannons to win by a wide 10-goal margin. He has also earned MLL Offensive Player of the Week honors twice this season.

Rabil has scored in each of the twelve regular season games he has played for the Cannons this year, averaging over 4 points per game. This key contributor is a critical element to the Cannons’ lineup, not only putting points on the board but stepping up his game in transition as well.

The 2009 MLL scoring leader will be expected to be an impact player in Boston’s semifinal game as the #4 seed Cannons take on the formidable #1 seed Denver Outlaws.

All-Time MLL Bud Light MVPs
2001 – Ryan Powell, Rochester Rattlers
2002 – Greg Cattrano, Baltimore Bayhawks
2003 – Jay Jalbert, Long Island Lizards
2004 – Conor Gill, Boston Cannons
2005 – Gary Gait, Baltimore Bayhawks; Mark Millon, Boston Cannons
2006 – Ryan Powell, San Francisco Dragons
2007 – John Grant Jr., Rochester Rattlers
2008 – John Grant Jr., Rochester Rattlers
2009 – Paul Rabil, Boston Cannons

Rabil earned seven first-place votes, adding up to 44 points. For a second time in the end of year awards process, Merrick Thomson of the Toronto Nationals was in the number two spot in the voting, finishing with three first-place votes, totaling 27 points.

You will see both Rabil and Thomson in Annapolis this weekend. Rabil and the Cannons will face the Denver Outlaws in the first playoff game on Saturday, August 22 at 12:00 PM ET while Thomson and the Toronto Nationals play the Long Island Lizards in the second semifinal match of day at 3:00 PM ET.

The winner of Saturday’s two semifinals will advance to the New Balance Championship Game at 1:00 pm ET on Sunday, August 23.

http://www.laxpower.com/laxnews/news.php?story=15992

San Diego High School Boys Lacrosse Profile: La Costa Canyon Attacker Brendan Gaughan (Video)


Brendan Gaughan – Boys Lacrosse Recruiting Video – 2012
La Costa Canyon High School
Californias toughest strength of schedule Westside LAX, May 29, 2009

Lacrosse Training And Conditioning: Devoe Human Performance Recommends “Body Weight Exercises” To Improve Lacrosse Fitness (Video)


devoehumanperformanceDon’t have access to a gym? Here are some basic bodyweight exercises you can do instead. You can do these exercises almost anywhere.

Lacrosse Training Drills (Video): “Speed Burst Improvement” Drill From US Lacrosse And S3 Training


US Lacrosse has partnered with S3 Training to bring you lacrosse and conditioning drills. Here, Rob Slade demonstrates a simple drill to improve speed burst.

Lacrosse Training Drills (Video): “Defensive Position Strength” Drill From US Lacrosse And S3 Training


US Lacrosse has partnered with S3 Training to bring you lacrosse conditioning and drills. Here, Rob Slade demonstrates how you can simulate the defensive position and build strength by maintaining a pushup platform.

West Coast Lacrosse: Oregon’s Lakeridge High School Boys Lacrosse Supplies Top Players For Chapman University Men’s Lacrosse Program


(From Lake Oswego Review Article) It’s no secret that Lakeridge High School has established itself as having one of the most elite lacrosse programs in the state if not the entire West Coast.

Rick Sheinin, a graduate of Lakeridge High School and Chapman University, is the offensive coordinator for Chapman’s vaunted men’s lacrosse program that features a handful of former Pacers. His father Curt Sheinin has built Lakeridge’s program from the ground up. He has won multiple state titles and is the winningest coach in Oregon boys lacrosse history. PHOTO COUTESY OF / RHINO LACROSSE

Rick Sheinin, a graduate of Lakeridge High School and Chapman University, is the offensive coordinator for Chapman’s vaunted men’s lacrosse program that features a handful of former Pacers. His father Curt Sheinin has built Lakeridge’s program from the ground up. He has won multiple state titles and is the winningest coach in Oregon boys lacrosse history. PHOTO COUTESY OF / RHINO LACROSSE

The Pacers are perennial contenders for a state title and at the helm of that success has been coach Curt Sheinin.

Sheinin is the winningest coach in the history of Oregon boys lacrosse and has helped transform scores of good athletes into tremendously skilled lacrosse players over the years.

Nowhere is that more evident than in Southern California.

The relatively small university in Orange, Calif. has become one of the top men’s lacrosse programs in the nation, reaching the MCLA national championship game for two seasons in a row.

But if you happened to watch the national title game in which Chapman fell 12-11 to Michigan in an extraordinarily well-played and exciting contest, you could be forgiven for thinking that it was a Lakeridge alumni game.

Chapman’s lacrosse program has been home to a veritable who’s who of some of the best players to have ever donned a Lakeridge uniform.

“It’s fun to watch. I go down to see them when I can,” Sheinin said.

On last season’s roster, there were five former Pacers, Nate Beres, Spenser Halvorsen, Connor Martin, Andrew Clayton and Michael Clayton.

Beres missed virtually all of last season after tearing his ACL early in the year but the other four Lakeridge graduates were not only strong contributors to the team, they were out and out stars.

So how exactly has Chapman formed such an impressive pipeline into Oregon and, specifically, directly into Lakeridge High School?

The answer is pretty simple. Curt Sheinin’s son, Rick, also a former player for Lakeridge and a graduate from Chapman, is the offensive coordinator for the Panthers and he has helped make the university a desired destination for his father’s former players.

It’s not exactly a hard sell.

After all, Chapman has one of the best lacrosse programs on the entire West Coast. It would be extremely difficult to find a comparable program anywhere west of the Mississippi.

“It’s pretty attractive to players up here. In the MCLA, unlike the NCAA, the power is in the West and so it’s a nice alternative,” Curt Sheinin said.

So for elite players in the Northwest who don’t feel like moving to the East Coast, Chapman is an ideal program.

And Rick certainly has an inside edge at reeling in Lakeridge’s top talent.

In short, it has been a near perfect marriage between the two programs.

Lakeridge players, as well as others around Oregon, get the opportunity to play elite caliber lacrosse without straying too far from home and Chapman benefits by contending for national title year in and year out.

“There is definitely an impressive talent pool in Oregon,” Curt Sheinin said.

Chapman only lost three games all last year, two to Michigan (including one in the national title game) and one to BYU which it later avenged in the postseason.

Michael Clayton entered his senior season in the spring as the preseason National Player of the Year. In many ways, Clayton started the trend of Pacers choosing Chapman to play collegiately.

But Clayton battled an ankle injury throughout the year. That opened the door for teammate Connor Martin, who led the team with 51 goals and 31 assists and would go on to win national player of the year.

In this year’s national championship tournament, Lakeridge’s talent was on full display.

Halvorsen was a force as one of the tournament’s top defenders.

Meanwhile, it seemed like virtually every crucial play in a key situation was turned in by a former Lakeridge player.

In the quarterfinals against Simon Fraser, Andrew Clayton had the assist on the game-winning goal. He would then go on to score the game-winner in the team’s semifinal victory over BYU.

And, in the finals, Lakeridge players scored nine of the team’s 11 goals.

Michael Clayton will be gone next year but the other four Pacers will be back on a team that should, once again, be one of the best in the country.

And those players may have a fresh new group of teammates with Oregon roots as Chapman continues to bolster its reputation.

http://www.lakeoswegoreview.com/sports/story.php?story_id=125072150937714000

College Lacrosse Recruiting: Peter Worstell’s “California Gold” And Most Premier Lacrosse Camps Increase Focus On Sophomore Lacrosse Recruiting


Inside LacrosseMore of the country’s premier summer camps and recruiting events, the ones that attract packs of college coaches, have added sessions for “rising sophomores,” or kids who have just completed their freshman seasons.

“The nature of recruiting has changed drastically over the past five years,” says former Syracuse All-America Mike Springer, a co-founder of Showtime. “Players are being identified earlier now than ever. Although rising sophomores can’t talk to coaches [per NCAA rules], early recognition for players is beneficial for them to have multiple opportunities to be seen.”

Many players who attend these events have yet to play in a varsity game, and are often recommended for participation by coaches the previous fall or winter — when they’ve just come out of middle school.

Jake Reed’s Nike Blue Chip at UMBC added a sophomore session this summer. Maverik Showtime in Connecticut, which continues to grow in status, is billed as an invite-only showcase for the top 160 rising sophomores and juniors. In the West, Peter Worstell’s California Gold includes sophomores as well.

Jake Reed’s Nike Blue Chip at UMBC added a sophomore session this summer. Maverik Showtime in Connecticut, which continues to grow in status, is billed as an invite-only showcase for the top 160 rising sophomores and juniors. In the West, Peter Worstell’s California Gold includes sophomores as well.

But there has certainly already proven to be a viable market. Players want to be noticed and land that scholarship. Coaches are always looking for an edge on their peers and these new events are an opportunity to get a headstart on the Classes of 2012, ’13 and beyond.

“It gives you an idea of who to track,” Cornell coach Jeff Tambroni said after watching a rising sophomore all-star game at July’s Long Island Showcase at Dowling College. “It helps in terms of homework, and the information can be good. But the kids are not fully developed, so you tend to look for athleticism and hope that the skills will catch up later.”

But how early is too early? Three years removed from being a freshman on campus means more time for injuries or other variables to affect a high school player’s status, which is why Tambroni and others worry about what he says is the likely inevitability of sophomores committing to colleges.

Even though direct contact between college coaches and recruits isn’t permitted until the start of junior year, coaches have found gray areas in the rule book (intermediaries, new technologies) to send and receive messages and arrange for campus visits.

“You have kids visiting before they’re juniors,” one DI coach says. “There’s no security guard at the gate.”

“That’s a scary prospect,” Tambroni says of sophomores committing. “That’s when I think it’s going to be unfair and mistakes will happen. There’s a big difference, physically and mentally, between juniors and sophomores.”

One Top 20 DI coach says the uncertainty that surround sophomores is why he’s hesitant, at this point, to dedicate most of his program’s recruiting energies toward them when talented juniors remain uncommitted. And while many programs are now leaving open space for late-blooming seniors, more players than ever are falling through the cracks — which is good news for programs outside the Top 10. The earlier guys commit, the more likely a top college team winds up with a dud whose development curve flattens.

But still, it appears the climate continues to trend younger. Nothing seemed to stop the rapid move toward juniors in the last five years. If anything, the circumstances now — more players and more exposure — are better suited to encourage earlier recruiting.

“That’s great if you’re a superstar,” says Landon (Md.) School coach Rob Bordley, using former Blue Chippers Matt Ward and Peter Lamade as examples. “But most kids aren’t. I hate where it’s going. It’s bad for the kids, and puts pressure on us and parents with all sorts of anxieties as kids enter their sophomore year. But it’s only the NCAA and the coaches that can stop it.”

There have been few indications of that happening soon. At the Long Island Showcase, which included separate games for rising sophomores, juniors and seniors, more than 15 college coaches took notes on the sophomores, including Tambroni, Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala, North Carolina’s Joe Breschi and representatives from Syracuse, Ohio State, Hofstra, Penn State and Army.

“Recruiting sophomores is just starting,” a top DI assistant says. “We will see in seven years how successful it is or is not. It will depend on how well the kids develop down the road.”

http://blogs.insidelacrosse.com/2009/08/20/inside-lacrosse-september-issue-the-rise-of-sophomore-recruiting/

College Lacrosse Recruiting: High School Lacrosse Players Should Create A Personal Website


What are the advantages of having a personal recruiting website? 

One stop shopping! Think about it for a second. College coaches are bombarded with a lot of information from prospects and high school and club coaches and it can become overwhelming! My suggestion is that simplifying the evaluation process for the college coach will not only streamline the process, the coaches will appreciate the effort.

 By creating a personal website, the prospect can include a copy of his personal profile, video link, copy of his high school transcripts etc. in an effort to “condense” all the information the coaches need to do a quick, yet efficient evaluation. And all the prospect needs to do is provide the coaches with the link!

  Tom Kovic

Lacrosse Training Drills (Video): “Tap-Tap Defensive Footwork” Drill From US Lacrosse And S3 Training


US Lacrosse has partnered with S3 Training to bring you lacrosse conditioning and drills. Here, Rob Slade demonstrates the tap-tap drill for improving defensive footwork.