Monthly Archives: July 2010

Men’s College Lacrosse: Will The “Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association” (MCLA) Teams Remain Primarily College Club Sport Programs?


Is there a way to make the MCLA a coach-friendly space or is it doomed to be, for the most part, a coaches killing field?

The most obvious factor – and isn’t it always? – is money.

The gap between the expectations and resources needed to field a tournament-caliber team in the Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) and the club infrastructure that the lacrosse programs typically fall under is widening at a dangerous pace.

MCLA teams with serious expectations of being selected to complete in the national tournament need a budget well into the hundreds of thousands of dollars just to stay on the radar, as well as player commitment on par with varsity programs and an organizational structure that relies on the unwavering dedication of young men between the ages of 18 and 22.

Considering the many variables involved, it’s impressive that as many quality programs across the country possessing aspirations for Denver even exist. When one understands that many MCLA teams are treated like ‘activities’ such as Frisbee, badminton, ballroom dancing or ping-pong by their institutions, it’s almost a miracle they’ve evolved to their current level.

Much of the credit for lacrosse’s evolution among the non-varsity ranks is due to the coaches who have accepted the thankless job of guiding the MCLA programs, many without a sniff of a paycheck and some with a tepid stipend. As it turns out, sadly, it’s the coaches who have become the biggest variable in the growth of the association.

Just in the last two years, the MCLA has lost some of its most experienced teachers. Some were axed as the result of conflict with the school administration; some were based on a poor relationship with the players, alumni or parents. Still others jumped to the varsity world. And then there were others who just couldn’t afford coaching at the club level.

Is there a way to make the MCLA a coach-friendly space or is it doomed to be, for the most part, a coaches killing field?

The most obvious factor – and isn’t it always? – is money.

For more:  http://www.laxmagazine.com/landing/index

Women’s Lacrosse Skills: Northwestern Women’s Lacrosse’ Katrina Dowd Demonstrates Favorite Trick Shots (Video)


Northwestern and U.S. team star Katrina Dowd unveils her favorite stick-trick shots.

National Lacrosse Camps: Naval Academy Lacrosse Camp Teaches Top Lacrosse Skills From Leadership To Setting And Defending Picks


 “As coaches, we have a tremendous amount of influence on kids today. And we place a lot of emphasis on leadership. I equate it to D-Day. The success of the operation were the guys on the beach — me standing next to you. They had to overcome all kinds of stuff to get the job done. They did it through leadership and they did it through caring about the guy next to them.”

 “If you watch the college game, there’s a lot of picking going on. Everybody has big strong athletes and they try to get an edge by picking. So we’re going over how to pick and how to defend it.”

“We’re going to talk about team offense,” said Young, former assistant to Bill Tierney at Princeton and now the lacrosse coach at nearby Anne Arundel Community College. “If you watch the college game, there’s a lot of picking going on. Everybody has big strong athletes and they try to get an edge by picking. So we’re going over how to pick and how to defend it.”

“We have kids from Hawaii, Alaska, Tennessee, California. We even had a camper fly in all the way from Australia,” said long-time Andover and North County coach Jon Appelt. “We hope here the kids take back what they learn to those areas that are not traditionally big lacrosse areas and share it with their teammates.”

“How lacrosse is presented to the kids at a young age is going to stay with them for a long time,” said Meade, whose teams have made the NCAA playoffs six of the last seven years, including the classic 2004 national championship game against Syracuse. “As coaches, we have a tremendous amount of influence on kids today. And we place a lot of emphasis on leadership. I equate it to D-Day. The success of the operation were the guys on the beach — me standing next to you. They had to overcome all kinds of stuff to get the job done. They did it through leadership and they did it through caring about the guy next to them.”

For more:  http://www.pressboxonline.com/story.cfm?id=6458

NCAA Women’s Lacrosse: Lacrosse Magazine Video Podcast Reviews Florida Women’s Lacrosse “Win Now” Determination (Video)


Episode 3 of Lacrosse Magazine’s weekly video podcast features the win-now inaugural Florida women’s lacrosse team, plus a look at the weekend ahead in college lax.

Western High School Boys Lacrosse Recruiting: ESPN Rise Games Featured Two Top California Seniors In Ryan Mix (Attacker, Notre Dame) And Steven Bogert (LSM, Penn State)


Ryan Mix – Newport Beach, CA  (Corona Del Mar HS)

Mix will attend Notre Dame in the fall. He is the son of coach GW Mix and plays with more intellect than most high schoolers. Mix, a crease attackman by trade, reminds me of a young Ryan Hoff. He’s an interior guy who chips in on ground balls and in the riding game. If given the opportunity he can dodge, showcasing a textbook inside roll move in Florida. Mix grew up alongside the LA Riptide, his Dad was the GM, and has benefitted from the tutelage of pro players along the way. His hands, brain and finishing skills put him in the mix for playing time in South Bend for Kevin Corrigan.

Steven Bogert – Carlsbad, CA (La Costa Canyon)

Bogert was orignally targetting Hofstra but will end up in happy valley playing defense for Penn State and new coach Jeff Tambroni. Bogert appears best suited to play pole in Division I. His style is very similar to Casey Hintgen who was a California long sticker who graduated from Dartmouth. Bogert is small but creates havoc with his stick and ground ball abilities.

 

The ESPN Rise games were held last week in Orlando, Florida. 96 recent high school graduates representing 29 states were broken up into four teams. ESPNU televised the championship game.

What stood out for me was the talent level of some of the players from non-traditional locations – places like Wisconsin, Illinois, Florida, California and Tennessee. Here are eleven ‘hidden gems’ who may find there way onto the field at the collegiate level in the near future.

For more:  http://insidelacrosse.com/news/2010/07/27/recruiting-roundup-quints-hidden-gems-espn-rise-games

NCAA Men’s Lacrosse Student-Athlete Profile: Holy Cross Men’s Lacrosse Sr. Brandon DeLisio Received “Vanhook-Vidulich Acedemic Research Award” As Top Chemistry Student


“Most student-athletes coming into a good school like Holy Cross have already done really well in high school to get here,” he said. “They should already be aware of the commitment they are making.”

 “My coach is really helpful, I’ve missed practices to do stuff for school and I have never been penalized,” DeLisio

Brandon DeLisio received the Vanhook-Vidulich award, which is given to a fourth year student for an excellent research thesis and presentation. DeLisio received the award as just a junior, an impressive oddity among other award recipients.

explained. “He brings recruits over to the lab to show them the opportunities available for them at Holy Cross as students, and I think it’s great that he can turn to me for stuff like that to get them interested.”

Holy Cross senior lacrosse player Brandon DeLisio has never had difficulty understanding that there is a reason why “student” comes first in the label of student-athlete. With the support and influence of his parents, DeLisio earned National Honor Society recognition while juggling commitments to both varsity football and lacrosse at Kingston High School. “My parents kept me involved in a lot of things,” said DeLisio. “I was always in the middle of doing stuff while school was going on, it was just the standard.”

DeLisio has maintained that mindset throughout his years thus far at Holy Cross, which can account for three successful varsity seasons as a Crusader and recognition for his academic research through his recent honor with the Vanhook-Vidulich award.

With his priorities already in order and a newfound interest in the field of chemistry, DeLisio set off on the college search. “There were a lot of schools that I could have played lacrosse at, but had weak chemistry programs. Or other schools had very strong chemistry programs, but I wouldn’t have been able to play lacrosse.” DeLisio found the best of both worlds at Holy Cross, one of the nation’s top producers of chemistry graduates certified by the American Chemical Society. “That fact was actually the number one thing to get me here,” said DeLisio.

From the get go, DeLisio took complete advantage of any opportunity Holy Cross had to offer. “My interest in research actually began at my orientation,” he said with a laugh. “I asked a lot of questions.” It was at his orientation in the summer of 2007 that he found out that research opportunities at Holy Cross were offered to undergrads. Something that “huge” (as DeLisio considered it) is a rarity among other colleges and universities.

For more:  http://www.goholycross.com/sports/m-lacros/2010-11/releases/20100723dna54m

Lacrosse Skills: Brett Hughes Demonstrates “Basic Defensive Positioning” (Video)


Brett Hughes demonstrates and explains the basic defensive positioning.