Men’s College Lacrosse: Will The “Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association” (MCLA) Teams Remain Primarily College Club Sport Programs?


Is there a way to make the MCLA a coach-friendly space or is it doomed to be, for the most part, a coaches killing field?

The most obvious factor – and isn’t it always? – is money.

The gap between the expectations and resources needed to field a tournament-caliber team in the Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) and the club infrastructure that the lacrosse programs typically fall under is widening at a dangerous pace.

MCLA teams with serious expectations of being selected to complete in the national tournament need a budget well into the hundreds of thousands of dollars just to stay on the radar, as well as player commitment on par with varsity programs and an organizational structure that relies on the unwavering dedication of young men between the ages of 18 and 22.

Considering the many variables involved, it’s impressive that as many quality programs across the country possessing aspirations for Denver even exist. When one understands that many MCLA teams are treated like ‘activities’ such as Frisbee, badminton, ballroom dancing or ping-pong by their institutions, it’s almost a miracle they’ve evolved to their current level.

Much of the credit for lacrosse’s evolution among the non-varsity ranks is due to the coaches who have accepted the thankless job of guiding the MCLA programs, many without a sniff of a paycheck and some with a tepid stipend. As it turns out, sadly, it’s the coaches who have become the biggest variable in the growth of the association.

Just in the last two years, the MCLA has lost some of its most experienced teachers. Some were axed as the result of conflict with the school administration; some were based on a poor relationship with the players, alumni or parents. Still others jumped to the varsity world. And then there were others who just couldn’t afford coaching at the club level.

Is there a way to make the MCLA a coach-friendly space or is it doomed to be, for the most part, a coaches killing field?

The most obvious factor – and isn’t it always? – is money.

For more:  http://www.laxmagazine.com/landing/index

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