Daily Archives: September 21, 2010

Lacrosse In The 1960’s: Navy Men’s Lacrosse Begins Their Dynasty By Winning 1960 National Lacrosse Championship With A 10-7 “Scalping Of Old Army” (Sports Illustrated, June 13, 1960)


Not the most optimistic admiral, however, could have foreseen the finality with which Navy would take over. Army, using only two midfield units, was tiring, and Navy suddenly was scooping up every loose ball. Navy’s Hank Chiles scored on a pass from Rippelmeyer, then did it again. Attackman Tom Mitchell scored. Then Rippelmeyer scored unassisted (beating Carpenter again), giving Navy a 7-6 lead and the game. In all, Navy scored seven straight goals to win 10-7, while treating All-America Miser like a floundering trout in a net. Army, which had 24 shots in the first half, got only eight in the second.

At west point last week the Army forgot a stern lesson from its own history and paid a dear price for the lapse. In 1763 it had invited the Chippewa and Sac tribes to demonstrate the Indian sport of lacrosse at Fort Mackinac in the Michigan territory. The Indians, using 200 braves to a side, obliged with a quick game, and then literally massacred their hosts. On Saturday Army again invited a lacrosse team in, and again the hosts got scalped.

The perpetrators of this latest indignity were a bunch of rough, brash extroverts from the U.S. Naval Academy. They came to West Point knowing that this game would decide the national championship, since both Army and Navy were undefeated in college competition. They played—as they have all season—with the ferocious joy of kids on a picnic.

For the past two years Army had held at least a share of the title, while Navy had foundered behind such traditional lacrosse powers as Johns Hopkins and Maryland. Though Navy had shown surprisingly well this year, Army still had to be considered the favorite. The Cadets were coached by Jim Adams, a slim, somber perfectionist. They had Bob Miser, a 6-foot 1-inch whirling dervish from Baltimore, who is the best attackman in lacrosse today. And they had a nationally known athlete, Bill Carpenter (the Lonesome End of football fame), who in a single year had become the best defenseman in college lacrosse. “They don’t say much, but they get the job done,” said Jim Adams of his quietly competent team.

Navy had at least one first-rate lacrosse star, too. He was Karl Rippelmeyer, a big, fast attackman from Baltimore with a knack of bulling his way around defensemen.

Enter effervescent Navy, arriving on the serene athletic scene at West Point with a wig, a monkey, some crazy hats, an assistant coach with a pocketful of firecrackers and a conviction that it was going to run the black and gold pants right off Army.

“My boys love to run, run, run,” said breezy Navy Coach Bill Bilderback as he downed a boilermaker in the bar at West Point‘s Hotel Thayer the night before the game. “You just can’t keep them from running. They think this game is fun.”

“You might say our approach is informal,” said Assistant Coach Lou Phipps, setting off a firecracker under the table to help settle his nerves. “The kids have great spirit, though I don’t know where they get the idea they can clown around as much as they do. On the way up here they bought me a wig. So what if I am bald? There’s a limit! And they’re nuts about hats. They bought some dizzy ones after our first game, against Rutgers, and they’ve worn them on every trip since.”

But Navy had more than zany exuberance. It had at least one first-rate lacrosse star, too. He was Karl Rippelmeyer, a big, fast attackman from Baltimore with a knack of bulling his way around defensemen.

At 9:30 a.m. a standing-room crowd of 5,500 listened to the band play On Brave Old Army Team, and heard Navy’s midget monkey scream back ei! ei! ei! Then came an outstanding show of lacrosse—that physically exhausting but psychologically satisfying game in which a player who has been fooled or outrun at least has the pleasure of clubbing his opponent with a stick.

The initial question—can Carpenter hold Rippelmeyer?—was settled in two minutes, and a painful secret was out. Tough Bill Carpenter, who once played an entire football game against Oklahoma with a dislocated shoulder, had a badly infected leg. He had refused to go into the hospital (“It’s easy to get in, hard to get out,” he said), and hoped the leg would improve. It hadn’t. At 2:03 of the first period, Ripplemeyer gave Carpenter a wonderful head fake, whirled past the Lonesome End’s injured left leg, and scored.

With Carpenter obviously lame the game was a tossup, and a new factor became crucial. In lacrosse, attackmen and defensemen are limited to their ends of the field, but the three midfielders play over the entire 120-yard-long, 60-yard-wide expanse. All season Navy had used three shifts of midfielders, letting each play three minutes and rest six. With well-rested midfielders, Navy had employed Bilderback‘s “run, run, run” theory, and the opposition had collapsed trying to keep up. Would Army?

Midway into the second period, with Navy leading 3-2, Army actually threatened to steal the game. Behind brutally hard checking the Cadets scored a stunning three goals in a minute and 13 seconds, all on assists from the sharp-passing Bob Miser. Yet at halftime Navy, trailing 5-3, was grandly unconcerned. “They think they’ve got us beat,” Bilderback told his team, “but we’ve got them.”

Not the most optimistic admiral, however, could have foreseen the finality with which Navy would take over. Army, using only two midfield units, was tiring, and Navy suddenly was scooping up every loose ball. Navy’s Hank Chiles scored on a pass from Rippelmeyer, then did it again. Attackman Tom Mitchell scored. Then Rippelmeyer scored unassisted (beating Carpenter again), giving Navy a 7-6 lead and the game. In all, Navy scored seven straight goals to win 10-7, while treating All-America Miser like a floundering trout in a net. Army, which had 24 shots in the first half, got only eight in the second.

The Navy victory took the lacrosse title back to Maryland, a state that considers the game its natural monopoly. The Baltimore area has long been the heartland of lacrosse. Old lacrosse sticks are cut down for Baltimore grammar schoolers, high school games draw thousands of spectators, and football is considered primarily a good conditioner for the only real “up” sport in the area. Thus it wasn’t surprising that more than 100 Marylanders drove to West Point for Saturday’s game, and that one of them, a Baltimore matron, should have the last word.

Each time Navy began moving the ball she would stand up and cheer wildly. And each time a prim Army officer behind her would say: “Madam, please sit down.” She couldn’t understand his calm attitude.

“You know,” she confided to a friend after the game, “they don’t deserve lacrosse up here!”

For more:  http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1134483/1/index.htm

MCLA Men’s Lacrosse Preview: Simon Fraser Men’s Lacrosse Lost Core Of 2010 Roster To Graduation And Might Struggle This Season


Simon Fraser (10-8, MCLA Semifinalist)

Key Loss: Adam Foss. The playmaker was the engine of the Clansmen’s attack, scoring 28 goals while setting up 29 others. While Fraser will likely be able to round up plenty more scorers this season, finding someone with a pass-first mentality will be a lot harder to replace.
Key Returnee: Chris Tessarolo. The lone member of the starting attack returning after the graduation of Foss and Ben Towner, Tessarolo will need to have a monster year if SFU wants to be in the hunt for a berth to Denver. His numbers last year (21g, 13a) were promising, but there will have to be a steep incline in his production.

Wild Card: Incoming class. The Clan needs a monster group of incoming rookies to restock the offensive end of the field with high-end talent. Fraser only carried 19 field players on its roster, and five of those graduated, taking with them 101 of the team’s 187 total goals. If the schedule looks anything like last year’s, SFU will need productivity from the jump.
Reality: Despite the spirited run to the national semifinals, Fraser was essentially a .500 team. It has lost the core of the team to graduation and, because of its tiny roster size, doesn’t have the returning depth to make me think the Clansmen can reprise their 2011 success. Thus, as mentioned above, they must roll the dice on attracting an epic freshman class to make the tourney. The Clan might struggle this year.

For more: http://www.laxmagazine.com/blogs/coyne/090810_midsummer_nights_ranking_mcla_div_one

Oregon College Women’s Lacrosse: Pacific University Women’s Lacrosse Middie Natalie Getchell Selected As A Noyce Scholar


Biology major and Boxer Lacrosse Midfielder Natalie Getchell named a 2010-2012 Pacific Noyce Scholar.

Pacific University Women's Lacrosse Noyce Scholar Natalie Getchell

This fall, Natalie became Pacific’s first undergraduate recipient of the National Science Foundation honor, awarded to highly qualified science and math majors headed toward careers in K-12 teaching.  

Natalie, a top returning middie on the Boxer Lacrosse squad, gained experience working with younger students at Echo Shaw Elementary School and while working at summer camps. She is a senior biology major from Beaverton who loves to be outdoors and is looking forward to becoming a high school biology teacher.    

Undergraduate Pacific Noyce Scholars receive $25,000 in scholarship funding to complete their degree and enter the Pacific College of Education Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program to become a K-12 STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) teacher.

Noyce Scholars commit to teaching for four years in a high needs school or district following completion of the MAT program.

For more:   http://www.pacificu.edu/news/detail.cfm?NEWS_ID=8357&CATEGORY_ID=1

Major League Lacrosse (MLL) Highlights: Denver Outlaws Made Playoffs For 6h Straight Season (Video)


In 2010 The Denver Outlaws won an overtime thriller against the Nationals, staged a late 4th quarter comeback over the Machine and clinched a playoff spot for the 6th straight season.

NCAA Division III Men’s Lacrosse: Husson University (ME) Men’s Lacrosse Hired New Coach Tim Murphy As School Builds Lacrosse Program (Video)


Husson University Men's Lacrosse Head Coach Tim Murphy

Husson University is pleased to announce Tim Murphy as the head coach of men’s lacrosse.  Murphy will serve as the second head coach in the history of the program and will use his experience and passion for the game to continue to build the young Eagles.

“We’re delighted to add Tim Murphy to our staff,” stated Director of Athletics Bob Reasso. “As a Maine native, Tim has strong ties to the state and will bring a great deal to our community.  As a coach, Tim has the necessary enthusiasm, integrity and knowledge of the game to build upon what we feel is already a successful program.  We are expecting big things for our lacrosse program and we feel that Tim is the coach that can make that vision a reality” continued Reasso.

Murphy replaces Jeremy Mattoon and inherits a young and talented program.   Last season the Eagles achieved a trip to the North Atlantic Conference (NAC) semifinal game and the program’s first winning record.  In addition to their accomplishments, the 2009-10 team saw an increased strength of schedule that will persist this season.  With no graduating seniors from last season and the 2009-10 NCAA Division III scoring leader, Ben Landry, the Eagles are poised for continued success.

Last season Tim Murphy served as the assistant coach at Franklin Pierce University.  Murphy helped the Ravens to the most wins in program history, as well as a winning home record.  Working primarily with the defense, Murphy helped the Ravens cut their goals against average from the previous season by more than six goals and the 2010 man down defensive unit was ranked second best in the Northeast 10 Conference.  One defenseman was named to the Northeast 10 All-Rookie Team under Murphy’s tutelage.