Concussions In Lacrosse: State Of Utah Looks To Enact Law Requiring Medical Clearance Of Athletes Suffering Head Injuries As Research Shows “Not All Concussions Are Or Should Be Treated The Same”


“A player should not return to the contest or practice on the same day which they have had a diagnosed or suspected concussion.”

"This is happening every day to athletes young and old," Pascrell said Tuesday, in reminding all of a staggering statistic, that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there occur an estimated 3.8 million concussions related to sports and recreation every year.

You cannot treat all concussions the same; they are not the same. And you cannot treat all people the same; they are not the same,” he said. “Even if you could treat all people the same, their experiences may not be the same with regard to a concussion.”

 

 

The NFL has recently adopted a new guideline to treating concussions, and Cantu has no doubt it will filter down into the NCAA and high schools by next fall. 

“A player should not return to the contest or practice on the same day which they have had a diagnosed or suspected concussion. If you can rule out that they have had a concussion, OK, let them go back in. If you make the diagnosis or you cannot rule it out, the guidelines for the NFL now are to not let them back,” Cantu said.

Locally in the Utah State Legislature, House Bill 204 has been proposed that would protect athletes with head injuries. The bill was formed after a Washington state law passed in 2009 required medical clearance of youth athletes suspected of suffering a concussion before returning to play. State Rep. Paul Pay, R-Clearfield, is the chief sponsor of the bill.

“This bill … requires an amateur sports organization to: adopt and enforce a concussion and head injury policy; and inform a parent or guardian of the policy and obtain the parent’s or guardian’s signature on the policy before permitting a child to participate in a sporting event …. [and] prohibits a child … from participating in a sports event of the amateur sports organization until the child receives medical clearance form a health care provider trained in the evaluation and management of a concussion,” according to House Bill 204.

Courtney Larson, a senior studying athletic training , from Ariz., also commented about the importance of understanding the severity of concussions.

“Concussions are not as understood as they should be,” she said. “When in doubt, don’t play. If you have symptoms, get checked out.”

For more:  http://universe.byu.edu/node/13099

One response to “Concussions In Lacrosse: State Of Utah Looks To Enact Law Requiring Medical Clearance Of Athletes Suffering Head Injuries As Research Shows “Not All Concussions Are Or Should Be Treated The Same”

  1. Saw my son’s first lacrosse game yesterday – all 3 minutes of it. He took a hit to the head, and sat out the rest of the game. Likely to miss the next week of practice, too, until he shows no postconcussive signs. I am a medical professional, and serve as the team’s medical provider on the sidelines. Would like to see two things in all arenas of contact sports. 1- SEVERE penalties for deliberate head to head contact. I was appalled at the number of illegal checks to the head in his game, but moreso that it is only a ONE minute non-releasable. Maybe a three minute non-releasable followed by an ejection of player. 2- How about more articles on equipment. As a parent and newcomer to the sport of lacrosse, I am totally ignorant to some of the gear used. I would suggest an article published, free of manufacturer bias, that puts helmets “head to head” in safety testing. I love the game so far, as does my son, but I want him to actually REMEMBER the games in which he’s played.

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