Tag Archives: 2014 Tewaaraton Award

Maryland Women’s Lacrosse Middie Taylor Cummings Receives 2014 Tewaaraton Award


After guiding the Terps to a 12th national championship last weekend, Maryland sophomore midfielder Taylor Cummings captured the 2014 Tewaaraton Award on a historical night Thursday at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Cummings became Maryland’s fifth overall winner and its fourth in the last five seasons after compiling a tremendous sophomore campaign for the Terps. The Ellicott City, Md., product led Maryland with 63 goals, 128 draw controls, 37 ground balls and 30 caused turnovers and ranked second on the Terps fourth-ranked scoring offense with 24 assists and 87 points. Cummings, who is also a U.S. Women’s National Team member, is a two-time IWLCA First Team All-American and earned All-ACC honors for a second time. She was tabbed to the ACC All-Tournament Team as Maryland captured its sixth consecutive conference title. Cummings was named NCAA Championship Most Valuable Player after a pair of superior performances in Maryland victories against Northwestern and Syracuse in the Final Four. Cummings joins Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012-2013) as Terrapins to win the nation’s top collegiate individual honor. She is the first female sophomore to ever win the Tewaaraton. Syracuse’s Mike Powell was the only other sophomore winner, taking the first of his two Tewaaraton awards in 1992. Native American brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson, the University of Albany stars who each broke the Division I lacrosse record for most points in a season, were co-winners of the Tewaaraton Award on the men’s side. They became the first Native Americans to win the coveted Tewaaraton trophy, which derives from the Mohawk name for the game and the progenitor of present day lacrosse.

After guiding the Terps to a 12th national championship last weekend, Maryland sophomore midfielder Taylor Cummings captured the 2014 Tewaaraton Award on a historical night Thursday at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.
Cummings became Maryland’s fifth overall winner and its fourth in the last five seasons after compiling a tremendous sophomore campaign for the Terps. The Ellicott City, Md., product led Maryland with 63 goals, 128 draw controls, 37 ground balls and 30 caused turnovers and ranked second on the Terps fourth-ranked scoring offense with 24 assists and 87 points.
Cummings, who is also a U.S. Women’s National Team member, is a two-time IWLCA First Team All-American and earned All-ACC honors for a second time. She was tabbed to the ACC All-Tournament Team as Maryland captured its sixth consecutive conference title. Cummings was named NCAA Championship Most Valuable Player after a pair of superior performances in Maryland victories against Northwestern and Syracuse in the Final Four.
Cummings joins Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012-2013) as Terrapins to win the nation’s top collegiate individual honor. She is the first female sophomore to ever win the Tewaaraton. Syracuse’s Mike Powell was the only other sophomore winner, taking the first of his two Tewaaraton awards in 1992.
Native American brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson, the University of Albany stars who each broke the Division I lacrosse record for most points in a season, were co-winners of the Tewaaraton Award on the men’s side. They became the first Native Americans to win the coveted Tewaaraton trophy, which derives from the Mohawk name for the game and the progenitor of present day lacrosse.

Albany Men’s Lacrosse Attackers Lyle & Miles Thompson Honored As Co-Winners Of 2014 Tewaaraton Award On May 29 In Washington DC


After dazzling the lacrosse world with amazing talent and ability, Miles Thompson and Lyle Thompson, brothers, teammates and Native Americans, were honored as co-winners of the 2014 Tewaaraton Trophy. This honor was bestowed at the Tewaaraton Ceremony at the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.  Honored guests included the many of the Thompson family, the UAlbany coaching staff, plus numerous lacrosse supporters and players and coaches from around the country. This is a historic day for the world of lacrosse, with the Thompsons, members of the Onondaga Nation, becoming the first Native Americans to be honored with the Tewaaraton Trophy. “It is the best feeling to share the award with my brother and be the first Native Americans to win it,” said Miles Thompson. “No words can express this feeling.” “Words cannot describe how happy I am, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Lyle Thompson. “To share the award with my brother is an honor.” Since its inception in 2001, the Tewaaraton Trophy, on the men’s or women’s side, has never been awarded to a pair of players.  The Thompson brothers become the first pair to achieve such a feat.  Each gave a speech to the crowd, bringing both, as well as many in the audience, to tears. “We grew up together, we stuck together throughout high school, and it shows how close we are,” said Miles Thompson. “For us it is about bringing a positive influence and helping people, not just Native Americans, but everyone,” said Lyle Thompson. “It is just humbling, it is an amazing honor to our university and program, honoring the players and coaches,” said UAlbany head coach Scott Marr. “It is great to have the first Native Americans winning the honor.  I cannot imagine how special it is for these two to win it together, for all of their family and teammates.” This is the first Tewaaraton Trophy to players from the America East since 2001, when Hofstra’s Doug Shanahan was selected as the award’s first recipient. Lyle Thompson, the USILA DI Outstanding Player of the Year, Outstanding Attackman and America East Player of the Year, finished with the top single season in Division I history, earning a DI-high 77 assists plus 51 goals to total 128 points, leading all of DI with 7.11 points per game.  He earned at least four points in all 18 of UAlbany’s games, including at least seven points in 11 games, including three goals and five assists in the win over Loyola against Joe Fletcher, a fellow Tewaaraton finalist. Miles Thompson, a USILA First Team All-American, America East Tournament MVP and All-America East First Team attackman, earned a DI-single season record 82 goals to lead DI with 4.56 per game, adding 37 assists for 119 points, the second-best all-time single season tally only to Lyle Thompson.  He earned at least four points in 17 of UAlbany’s 18 games, including six games with at least six goals.  He earned seven goals and two assists apiece in each America East Tournament victory.

After dazzling the lacrosse world with amazing talent and ability, Miles Thompson and Lyle Thompson, brothers, teammates and Native Americans, were honored as co-winners of the 2014 Tewaaraton Trophy.
This honor was bestowed at the Tewaaraton Ceremony at the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Honored guests included the many of the Thompson family, the UAlbany coaching staff, plus numerous lacrosse supporters and players and coaches from around the country.
This is a historic day for the world of lacrosse, with the Thompsons, members of the Onondaga Nation, becoming the first Native Americans to be honored with the Tewaaraton Trophy.
“It is the best feeling to share the award with my brother and be the first Native Americans to win it,” said Miles Thompson. “No words can express this feeling.”
“Words cannot describe how happy I am, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Lyle Thompson. “To share the award with my brother is an honor.”
Since its inception in 2001, the Tewaaraton Trophy, on the men’s or women’s side, has never been awarded to a pair of players. The Thompson brothers become the first pair to achieve such a feat. Each gave a speech to the crowd, bringing both, as well as many in the audience, to tears.
“We grew up together, we stuck together throughout high school, and it shows how close we are,” said Miles Thompson.
“For us it is about bringing a positive influence and helping people, not just Native Americans, but everyone,” said Lyle Thompson.
“It is just humbling, it is an amazing honor to our university and program, honoring the players and coaches,” said UAlbany head coach Scott Marr. “It is great to have the first Native Americans winning the honor. I cannot imagine how special it is for these two to win it together, for all of their family and teammates.”
This is the first Tewaaraton Trophy to players from the America East since 2001, when Hofstra’s Doug Shanahan was selected as the award’s first recipient.
Lyle Thompson, the USILA DI Outstanding Player of the Year, Outstanding Attackman and America East Player of the Year, finished with the top single season in Division I history, earning a DI-high 77 assists plus 51 goals to total 128 points, leading all of DI with 7.11 points per game. He earned at least four points in all 18 of UAlbany’s games, including at least seven points in 11 games, including three goals and five assists in the win over Loyola against Joe Fletcher, a fellow Tewaaraton finalist.
Miles Thompson, a USILA First Team All-American, America East Tournament MVP and All-America East First Team attackman, earned a DI-single season record 82 goals to lead DI with 4.56 per game, adding 37 assists for 119 points, the second-best all-time single season tally only to Lyle Thompson. He earned at least four points in 17 of UAlbany’s 18 games, including six games with at least six goals. He earned seven goals and two assists apiece in each America East Tournament victory.