Tag Archives: Coaches

“Lacrosse Magazine” December 2014 Issue Released Featuring “Person Of The Year” Lyle Thompson & Lives Of Women’s Lacrosse Coaches


Every season, there are players that capture the attention and imagination of fans - some because they anchor championship teams, others because of amazing achievements and talent, still more for inspirational stories of how they got to be where they are at the top of the game. But seldom is there a player which captures the world of lacrosse the way Lyle Thompson did in 2014. A once-in-a-generation talent, the University of Albany and Iroquois Nationals star also celibrates the games roots through his heritage and has made it clear that he hopes to serve as an ambassador of its growth for the rest of his life.  Corey McLaughlin visited the Thompson family in New York for the feature story on the rising senior and his family, anchoring a look back at 2014 that includes our Stories of the Year and Best of Lacrosse nominations for the online fan vote, running through the end of November on LaxMagazine.com

Every season, there are players that capture the attention and imagination of fans – some because they anchor championship teams, others because of amazing achievements and talent, still more for inspirational stories of how they got to be where they are at the top of the game.
But seldom is there a player which captures the world of lacrosse the way Lyle Thompson did in 2014. A once-in-a-generation talent, the University of Albany and Iroquois Nationals star also celibrates the games roots through his heritage and has made it clear that he hopes to serve as an ambassador of its growth for the rest of his life.
Corey McLaughlin visited the Thompson family in New York for the feature story on the rising senior and his family, anchoring a look back at 2014 that includes our Stories of the Year and Best of Lacrosse nominations for the online fan vote, running through the end of November on LaxMagazine.com

COLUMNS

From the Editor – Proud Coach’s Husband

by Matt DaSilva

As the husband of a woman who coaches both the University of Notre Dame of Maryland soccer and lacrosse teams after writing her name all over the school’s record books, I’m intimately aware of the sacrifices and rewards that living the dual coach/mother life brings.

His Space – Meet the Women of Walla Walla

by Bill Tanton

Another western outpost for the game springs up in an unlikely place – Walla Walla, Washington, where Whitman College begins play under Maryland transplant Kate Robinson. The game has come a long way since I first picked up a stick in 1947.

Her Space – Coaches, Moms and Mentors

by Kate Hickman

Some of the top coaches in women’s lacrosse – women like North Carolina’s Jenny Levy, Penn State’s Missy Doherty and Denver’s Liza Kelly – balance team duties with the raising of their own families. It’s a dual feat that deserves a ton of respect and an example for us all.

 

Cal Berkeley Women’s Lacrosse Names Brooke Eubanks As Head Coach; Long-Time Stanford Assistant Coach & Canadian National Team Player


Brooke Eubanks, a long-time assistant coach at Stanford who won multiple medals as a player for the Canadian Senior National Team, has been named head coach for women’s lacrosse at the University of California, Berkeley. “Lacrosse is my passion,” Eubanks said. “It's the game I love to play and the game I love to coach. Being fortunate enough to play lacrosse in college and in three World Cups was too short-lived. I knew early on that I wanted to be a head coach and continue enjoying this great sport. I can't imagine a better place, a better university or a better time to be a head coach than right now at Cal. I am thrilled for this opportunity, and I promise not to disappoint.”

Brooke Eubanks, a long-time assistant coach at Stanford who won multiple medals as a player for the Canadian Senior National Team, has been named head coach for women’s lacrosse at the University of California, Berkeley.
“Lacrosse is my passion,” Eubanks said. “It’s the game I love to play and the game I love to coach. Being fortunate enough to play lacrosse in college and in three World Cups was too short-lived. I knew early on that I wanted to be a head coach and continue enjoying this great sport. I can’t imagine a better place, a better university or a better time to be a head coach than right now at Cal. I am thrilled for this opportunity, and I promise not to disappoint.”

During her time at Stanford, Eubanks served as the team’s offensive coordinator and recruiting coordinator with responsibilities such as in-game play calling, scouting opponents and coordinating practices. With her help, the Cardinal won four Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF) championships, garnered multiple national top-10 rankings, set a school record for the most wins in a season in program history (16, 2011) and produced four MPSF Players of the Year and one MPSF Rookie of the Year. In addition, Stanford earned IWLCA Division I Merit Squad recognition in 2011.

“Brooke has demonstrated a commitment to high achievement on the field and in the classroom for more than a decade as both a player and a coach at the collegiate level, and I believe that she will be a wonderful fit for our lacrosse program, our department and our university,” said Interim Director of Athletics Mike Williams. “Brooke brings a passion for lacrosse as well as a desire to create a strong team culture and positive atmosphere that should clearly benefit our student-athletes. I am excited to welcome her to Cal.”

Prior to her tenure at Stanford, Eubanks was an assistant coach at George Mason from 2006-08. During that span, George Mason collected the school record for wins in a season (12, 2008) and garnered the team’s highest national ranking in school history at No. 9. Eubanks served under current Stanford head coach Amy Bokker at both Stanford and George Mason.

“We’re very happy for Brooke in taking the next step in her coaching career,” Bokker said. “Brooke has been a dedicated part of Stanford Lacrosse. I certainly appreciate all she has done to help build the program. Now, she is prepared and ready to lead her own. Cal is getting a quality coach and person and we wish her the best.”

As a player, Eubanks was a member of the Canadian Senior National Team from 2003-13, playing in three World Cups. Canada won the silver medal in 2013, with Eubanks serving as team captain. She was second on her team in scoring in the 2009 World Cup, helping the Canadians capture the bronze medal.

Eubanks enjoyed a successful collegiate career at James Madison from 2002-06 where she was a four-year starter and led the squad to three Colonial Athletic Association championships. The Patriots advanced to the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament in 2004 and ’06. Individually, Eubanks was an all-conference second-team selection and a member of the CAA all-tournament team in both 2005 and ’06. She was also named to the 2006 Virginia Sports Information Directors’ Association All-State Team.

Raised in Englewood, Colo., Eubanks is the daughter of 1980 Pittsburgh Penguin NHL draft pick Steve McKenzie and was born in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada, while her father was playing minor-league hockey there.

Brooke and her husband, Eric, have a daughter, Olive.

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From RIT Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Jake Coon And ConnectLAX


ConnectLAX Logo

This week we chat with RIT Head Men’s Lacrosse Coach, Jake Coon. His Tigers currently boast a 15-0 record and are no. 1 in the USILA DIII poll. Coach Coon has amassed a 68-13 record in only four years at the helm of the RIT men’s lacrosse program. In that time the Tigers appeared in four straight NCAA Tournaments, including a trip to the National Championship in 2013.
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RIT Men's Lacrosse Head Coach Jake Coon
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When it comes to the recruiting process, Coach Coon believes players need to demonstrate initiative and be proactive in order to find the best fit school. If a player works hard and is willing to be coached, then Coach Coon can find a role for that player on his team. Finally, there’s a lot of competition throughout college lacrosse. Young players need to become dynamic players that always look to refine their skill set.
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What advice do you have for players interested in playing Division III lacrosse?
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When considering Division III schools young players have a lot of options both academically and athletically. They need to do their homework. Find out what majors a school offers and see if the academics match their needs.
Aside from a Division III label, you are still going to play high level lacrosse. It’s very competitive and demanding. RIT often scrimmages and beats Division I programs in the off season.
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What is the best way for players to get on your recruiting radar?
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Be proactive with emails and phone calls. We typically want to see a recruit play over their fall and summer seasons. Again, be proactive. We like young men who reach out to us and express their interest. 

Yes, the coach has some responsibility to recruit the player, but in the end players should initiate and maintain contact throughout their recruiting process. 

What type of player do you look for–raw athlete or refined lacrosse player?

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It really depends on our current team. If we’re losing 4 midfielders, then we’ll look for 2 offensive and 2 defensive midfielders. We generally try to match our needs.
Our players tend to be grinders. They’re very skilled as well. Being physical off-ball and having a scrappy mindset is important for us. If a player is willing to be coached, then we can find a role for them.
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What areas of development would you recommend players focus on to compete at the Division III level?
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Players should get out of their comfort zone. Become dynamic players. Many kids come into college with only one hand. An attackman that masters the question mark dodge, for example, should look to develop another move. Defensive players who are really good at ground balls should look to improve their footwork or other areas of their game. Always be thinking, “What’s next?”
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How has the accelerated recruiting landscape affected your approach to recruiting? 
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We try not to let it affect us. We do get early commitments and we also pick up kids late in the process who are very talented. During the season I don’t do much recruiting at all.
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Some final thoughts from Coach Coon:
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There’s a lot of parity in college lacrosse. We see a lot of great teams and a lot of great, developing programs each year. The competition remains very high among all college teams, even those that aren’t ranked. Our cross town rival, Nazareth, isn’t ranked but they still play us close each time we meet.

Bottom line, if you have talent you can find a home in the lacrosse world.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)

Weekly LAXPost Recruiting Newsletter From ConnectLAX: “What College Coaches Look For”


Learn What College Coaches Are Looking For With The Weekly LAXPost

Get recruiting advice from college coaches and stay up-to-date on recruiting trends with the LAXPost, a free weekly recruiting newsletter. Discover news and events in a clean and clear newsletter that’s all content, no ads. Sign up here:

http://www.connectlax.com/newsletter

Learn what college coaches are looking for in a player and the best ways to get on their recruiting radar. Get practical tips on how to stand out in today’s accelerated recruiting landscape and how this trend impacts the recruiting approach of college coaches.

When Fairfield Coach Andy Copelan was a Maryland assistant, he remembers Coach Cottle saying, “If you stay the same, you get worse”. Learn how to grow your game and recruiting knowledge with the LAXPost weekly newsletter from ConnectLAX.

View past LAXPost newsletters at ConnectLAX.com and find featured recruiting events to elevate or showcase your game this summer.

Are you a college lacrosse player looking to learn about Digital Marketing in New York City this summer? Check out the jobs link at the bottom of ConnectLAX and spend your summer covering and playing lacrosse.

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From Denison Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Michael Caravana And ConnectLAX


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With an accelerated recruiting process young players feel more pressure to commit early rather than assess all their possible college options. The question on recruits’ minds is often where can I commit to play lacrosse? Instead young players should consider asking themselves where can I find the best balance between academics and lacrosse. The best ‘fit’ for a young player will be a school that allows them to develop into a well-rounded person who reaches their potential academically and athletically.

This week we caught up with Michael Caravana, the head coach of Denison University. Currently, the Big Red are 7-0 and are ranked 5th in the Division III USILA Top 20 Poll.

Denison Men's Lacrosse

Coach Caravana has been at the helm of the program for over 20 years and is one of the winningest coaches in college lacrosse. He draws his knowledge of the game from his playing experience at the University of Virginia, where he was a 4x All American, and from his coaching days as an assistant at Brown and an assistant for the U.S. Men’s National team.

Coach Caravana believes that good players become great players when they can compete at their best on a consistent basis.

This starts with preparation off the field and a strong desire to get better every day. What advice do you have for players interested in Division III schools?

It’s important for young players to realize that the level of competition at the top Division III programs is similar to the competition at mid-tier Division I schools.

Division III athletes may also find a greater life balance. In the offseason, there are less practices and players have time to do other things like study abroad. Ultimately, a player controls their commitment level and how much they will improve as a player in the offseason.

What is the best way for players to get on your radar?

Contacting a coach directly is always effective. Give the coach a highlight film so that the coaching staff can assess your game. Being a good student is important also. Coaches look at indicators like GPA and sometimes standardized test scores.

What type of players do you look for, raw athlete or refined lacrosse players?

It’s important to have a combination of athleticism and lacrosse skills. Being highly competitive and having the ability to play hard is great too. Most freshmen do not contribute to their teams as freshmen. But being able to compete and get better as a lacrosse player and an athlete ensures that a young player will develop into a contributing member.

What areas of development would you recommend players focus on to compete at the Division III level?

The ability to constantly get better is important. This starts with practice habits and preparation. Do not give your coaches mediocre effort. At the college level, lacrosse becomes AP lacrosse, not Honors lacrosse. Good students cannot expect to do well when they turn in B or B- work. Students need to turn in A or A+ work in order to truly succeed. The same goes for lacrosse.

How has the accelerated recruiting landscape impacted your approach to recruiting?

With top Division 1 programs picking their players earlier on we’re given another pool of lacrosse players. We have the ability to identify good recruits, but also find players who fit academically. It becomes less about lacrosse and more about where a student fits as a person and as a student-athlete.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by the Denison University.

 

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From Army Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Joe Alberici And ConnectLAX


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We had the very fortunate opportunity to speak with Coach Joe Alberici at Army to get his advice for recruits and more specifically, recruits out West who are looking to go East for college lacrosse. Coach Alberici has had an impressive career including coaching at Duke where he helped strengthen the Blue Devils as one of the nation’s premier lacrosse programs.

Army.ConnectLAXIn 2006, he became the coach at Army and is now in his ninth season, where he continues to man a very impressive group of student-athletes. Here’s what Coach Alberici had to tell us about recruiting and his advice for player’s eager to get noticed: be a well-rounded athlete with multiple weapons and a strong work-ethic that mirrors those abilities.

1. What advice do you have for West Coast players interested in Division I schools, which are primarily located on the East Coast?

Be assertive, think of recruiting as managing your own franchise. You have to find ways to get in front of coaches eyes. It’s best to be seen live, but also keep an open line of communication with coaches. In your e-mails, be sure to include your video that highlights the skills you have which set you apart from the competition, especially your athleticism. Be specific about why you want to go to that school such as the academic curriculum. Keep in mind that coaches get hundreds of these emails, so personalization goes a long way.

2. What is the best way for West Coast players to get on your recruiting radar?

One of the best ways to get on coaches recruiting radar is to go to their prospecting days. It is best to identify 1-2 schools who have their prospecting days close to each other to cut down on travel expenses. Be sure to ask the right questions about the prospecting days such as how many players are expected to be in attendance and if all the coaches on staff going to be there. These are good questions to ask because you may be playing against 50 or 250 other players and that could make a difference of you getting noticed. Use the first few lines of your email to explain who you are and the remaining 1-2 paragraphs include your contact info and references such as coaches and private instructors.

3. What type of player’s do you primarily look for, a raw athlete or refined lacrosse player?

Athleticism is the first thing we take into account and some “thing” that stands out from the rest of the players, be it stick skills, hustle or tenacity. In your highlight videos, be sure accentuate those skills. A DI guy has a good mixture of drive, skill, and character along with people to reference all of that.

4. What areas of player development would you recommend West Coast players focus on to compete on the East Coast level?

My best advice is to get the stick in your hands as much as possible and compete with players a level or two above you. Play adult leagues. Playing against older and more experienced players will wear off on you and force you to get better through “osmosis.” Also, don’t just go through the motions while playing, be an active learner, ask questions and learn specifics from experienced players and try to emulate their skills. Seek out the guys who have done it and pick their brain. To play with this kind of competition you may need to travel a little, depending on your area, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to join a travel team, just do your homework.

5. How has the accelerated recruiting landscape impacted your approach to recruiting?

It’s difficult to see everyone when they’re young, it’s just part of the landscape. There are still a lot of great players and late-bloomers who may have been missed, so we keep spots open for that. We are going to recruit nationally regardless, we aren’t locked into any particular areas.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. Military Academy.

NCAA Lacrosse: Denver Women’s Lacrosse Head Coach Liza Kelly Introduces 7 Freshman Players


Denver Women's Lacrosse

The University of Denver women’s lacrosse team welcomes seven new faces to the program this year to help replace five graduating seniors from last season.
“This freshman class brings in a lot of size and speed,” said head coach Liza Kelly. “They are working really hard and being pushed to better themselves. This is a different team and these girls are ready to get the season started.”

Molly DankoA midfielder from Baltimore, Danko comes in with three years of experience with The Bryn Mawr School. Danko has been honored with numerous awards during her high school career, including being named to the 2013 Balimore Messenger Girls All-Star Lacrosse Frist Team and the 2013 Towson Times Girls All-Star Second Team. Additionally, Danko played in the 2012 Under Armor Underclassmen Games. Outside of lacrosse, Danko played four years of field hockey and basketball in high school, leading her team to the IAAM A Conference Championship and Final No. 1 ranking in the state of Maryland in 2009.

Hunter GrayA defenseman from Mount Laurel, N.J., Gray becomes a Pioneer after playing four years of lacrosse at Lenape High School. Gray is a two-time recipient of the All-South Jersey First Team and All-Conference First Team. Gray was also honored as a member of the All-County (Burlington County) First Team in 2012. Additionally, Gray played field hockey in high school, earning All-Conference Second Team.

Ellie KnottA midfielder from Baltimore, Knott enters DU after playing four years at The Bryn Mawr School. Knott chose Denver for its strong academics and competitive athletics. Knott also considered Boston College, James Madison, Virginia Tech and Virginia for lacrosse. In addition to lacrosse, Knott played four years of field hockey.

Nicole MartindaleAt attack from Brooklin, Ontario, Martindale led the Lady Blue Knights club team to six Provincial Lacrosse Championships. Martindale was named to the Syracuse Nike Cup All-Star Team in 2011 and 2012. Martindale also played ice hockey in high school, leading her team to three Provincial Hockey Championships.

Sybil PallaceA midfielder from Baltimore, Pallace led Mc Dough High School to four undefeated seasons and the No. 1 ranking in the nation. Pallace played seven seasons for the Skywalkers club team, winning the Charm City Tournament. Pallace also played soccer, tennis and basketball in high school.

Maddy StevensonA goalkeeper from Bainbridge Island, Wash., Stevenson led her team to a pair of Washington State Championships in 2011 and 2012. Additionally, Stevenson earned All-State First Team in four-consecutive years from 2010-13. Stevenson also played four years of volleyball in high school as an outside hitter.

Layne VoorheesA midfielder from Alexandria, Va., Voorhees comes to DU after playing three years at St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes School. Voorhees helped her team to three-consecutive VISAA State Championships from 2011-13.

DU finished the 2013 season with an 18-3 record, beating Jacksonville 14-7 in the NCAA Tournament first round. Denver went undefeated at home and had a perfect 8-0 record in the regular season against Mountain Pacific Sports Federation teams.

The Crimson and Gold opens its 2014 schedule against Colorado at Peter Barton Lacrosse Stadium on Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 3 p.m. Additionally, Denver will host the 2014 MPSF Tournament from May 1-3.

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