Tag Archives: ConnectLAX

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From RIT Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Jake Coon And ConnectLAX


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This week we chat with RIT Head Men’s Lacrosse Coach, Jake Coon. His Tigers currently boast a 15-0 record and are no. 1 in the USILA DIII poll. Coach Coon has amassed a 68-13 record in only four years at the helm of the RIT men’s lacrosse program. In that time the Tigers appeared in four straight NCAA Tournaments, including a trip to the National Championship in 2013.
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RIT Men's Lacrosse Head Coach Jake Coon
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When it comes to the recruiting process, Coach Coon believes players need to demonstrate initiative and be proactive in order to find the best fit school. If a player works hard and is willing to be coached, then Coach Coon can find a role for that player on his team. Finally, there’s a lot of competition throughout college lacrosse. Young players need to become dynamic players that always look to refine their skill set.
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What advice do you have for players interested in playing Division III lacrosse?
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When considering Division III schools young players have a lot of options both academically and athletically. They need to do their homework. Find out what majors a school offers and see if the academics match their needs.
Aside from a Division III label, you are still going to play high level lacrosse. It’s very competitive and demanding. RIT often scrimmages and beats Division I programs in the off season.
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What is the best way for players to get on your recruiting radar?
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Be proactive with emails and phone calls. We typically want to see a recruit play over their fall and summer seasons. Again, be proactive. We like young men who reach out to us and express their interest. 

Yes, the coach has some responsibility to recruit the player, but in the end players should initiate and maintain contact throughout their recruiting process. 

What type of player do you look for–raw athlete or refined lacrosse player?

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It really depends on our current team. If we’re losing 4 midfielders, then we’ll look for 2 offensive and 2 defensive midfielders. We generally try to match our needs.
Our players tend to be grinders. They’re very skilled as well. Being physical off-ball and having a scrappy mindset is important for us. If a player is willing to be coached, then we can find a role for them.
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What areas of development would you recommend players focus on to compete at the Division III level?
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Players should get out of their comfort zone. Become dynamic players. Many kids come into college with only one hand. An attackman that masters the question mark dodge, for example, should look to develop another move. Defensive players who are really good at ground balls should look to improve their footwork or other areas of their game. Always be thinking, “What’s next?”
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How has the accelerated recruiting landscape affected your approach to recruiting? 
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We try not to let it affect us. We do get early commitments and we also pick up kids late in the process who are very talented. During the season I don’t do much recruiting at all.
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Some final thoughts from Coach Coon:
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There’s a lot of parity in college lacrosse. We see a lot of great teams and a lot of great, developing programs each year. The competition remains very high among all college teams, even those that aren’t ranked. Our cross town rival, Nazareth, isn’t ranked but they still play us close each time we meet.

Bottom line, if you have talent you can find a home in the lacrosse world.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)

Weekly LAXPost Recruiting Newsletter From ConnectLAX: “What College Coaches Look For”


Learn What College Coaches Are Looking For With The Weekly LAXPost

Get recruiting advice from college coaches and stay up-to-date on recruiting trends with the LAXPost, a free weekly recruiting newsletter. Discover news and events in a clean and clear newsletter that’s all content, no ads. Sign up here:

http://www.connectlax.com/newsletter

Learn what college coaches are looking for in a player and the best ways to get on their recruiting radar. Get practical tips on how to stand out in today’s accelerated recruiting landscape and how this trend impacts the recruiting approach of college coaches.

When Fairfield Coach Andy Copelan was a Maryland assistant, he remembers Coach Cottle saying, “If you stay the same, you get worse”. Learn how to grow your game and recruiting knowledge with the LAXPost weekly newsletter from ConnectLAX.

View past LAXPost newsletters at ConnectLAX.com and find featured recruiting events to elevate or showcase your game this summer.

Are you a college lacrosse player looking to learn about Digital Marketing in New York City this summer? Check out the jobs link at the bottom of ConnectLAX and spend your summer covering and playing lacrosse.

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From Denison Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Michael Caravana And ConnectLAX


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With an accelerated recruiting process young players feel more pressure to commit early rather than assess all their possible college options. The question on recruits’ minds is often where can I commit to play lacrosse? Instead young players should consider asking themselves where can I find the best balance between academics and lacrosse. The best ‘fit’ for a young player will be a school that allows them to develop into a well-rounded person who reaches their potential academically and athletically.

This week we caught up with Michael Caravana, the head coach of Denison University. Currently, the Big Red are 7-0 and are ranked 5th in the Division III USILA Top 20 Poll.

Denison Men's Lacrosse

Coach Caravana has been at the helm of the program for over 20 years and is one of the winningest coaches in college lacrosse. He draws his knowledge of the game from his playing experience at the University of Virginia, where he was a 4x All American, and from his coaching days as an assistant at Brown and an assistant for the U.S. Men’s National team.

Coach Caravana believes that good players become great players when they can compete at their best on a consistent basis.

This starts with preparation off the field and a strong desire to get better every day. What advice do you have for players interested in Division III schools?

It’s important for young players to realize that the level of competition at the top Division III programs is similar to the competition at mid-tier Division I schools.

Division III athletes may also find a greater life balance. In the offseason, there are less practices and players have time to do other things like study abroad. Ultimately, a player controls their commitment level and how much they will improve as a player in the offseason.

What is the best way for players to get on your radar?

Contacting a coach directly is always effective. Give the coach a highlight film so that the coaching staff can assess your game. Being a good student is important also. Coaches look at indicators like GPA and sometimes standardized test scores.

What type of players do you look for, raw athlete or refined lacrosse players?

It’s important to have a combination of athleticism and lacrosse skills. Being highly competitive and having the ability to play hard is great too. Most freshmen do not contribute to their teams as freshmen. But being able to compete and get better as a lacrosse player and an athlete ensures that a young player will develop into a contributing member.

What areas of development would you recommend players focus on to compete at the Division III level?

The ability to constantly get better is important. This starts with practice habits and preparation. Do not give your coaches mediocre effort. At the college level, lacrosse becomes AP lacrosse, not Honors lacrosse. Good students cannot expect to do well when they turn in B or B- work. Students need to turn in A or A+ work in order to truly succeed. The same goes for lacrosse.

How has the accelerated recruiting landscape impacted your approach to recruiting?

With top Division 1 programs picking their players earlier on we’re given another pool of lacrosse players. We have the ability to identify good recruits, but also find players who fit academically. It becomes less about lacrosse and more about where a student fits as a person and as a student-athlete.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by the Denison University.

 

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From Army Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Joe Alberici And ConnectLAX


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We had the very fortunate opportunity to speak with Coach Joe Alberici at Army to get his advice for recruits and more specifically, recruits out West who are looking to go East for college lacrosse. Coach Alberici has had an impressive career including coaching at Duke where he helped strengthen the Blue Devils as one of the nation’s premier lacrosse programs.

Army.ConnectLAXIn 2006, he became the coach at Army and is now in his ninth season, where he continues to man a very impressive group of student-athletes. Here’s what Coach Alberici had to tell us about recruiting and his advice for player’s eager to get noticed: be a well-rounded athlete with multiple weapons and a strong work-ethic that mirrors those abilities.

1. What advice do you have for West Coast players interested in Division I schools, which are primarily located on the East Coast?

Be assertive, think of recruiting as managing your own franchise. You have to find ways to get in front of coaches eyes. It’s best to be seen live, but also keep an open line of communication with coaches. In your e-mails, be sure to include your video that highlights the skills you have which set you apart from the competition, especially your athleticism. Be specific about why you want to go to that school such as the academic curriculum. Keep in mind that coaches get hundreds of these emails, so personalization goes a long way.

2. What is the best way for West Coast players to get on your recruiting radar?

One of the best ways to get on coaches recruiting radar is to go to their prospecting days. It is best to identify 1-2 schools who have their prospecting days close to each other to cut down on travel expenses. Be sure to ask the right questions about the prospecting days such as how many players are expected to be in attendance and if all the coaches on staff going to be there. These are good questions to ask because you may be playing against 50 or 250 other players and that could make a difference of you getting noticed. Use the first few lines of your email to explain who you are and the remaining 1-2 paragraphs include your contact info and references such as coaches and private instructors.

3. What type of player’s do you primarily look for, a raw athlete or refined lacrosse player?

Athleticism is the first thing we take into account and some “thing” that stands out from the rest of the players, be it stick skills, hustle or tenacity. In your highlight videos, be sure accentuate those skills. A DI guy has a good mixture of drive, skill, and character along with people to reference all of that.

4. What areas of player development would you recommend West Coast players focus on to compete on the East Coast level?

My best advice is to get the stick in your hands as much as possible and compete with players a level or two above you. Play adult leagues. Playing against older and more experienced players will wear off on you and force you to get better through “osmosis.” Also, don’t just go through the motions while playing, be an active learner, ask questions and learn specifics from experienced players and try to emulate their skills. Seek out the guys who have done it and pick their brain. To play with this kind of competition you may need to travel a little, depending on your area, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to join a travel team, just do your homework.

5. How has the accelerated recruiting landscape impacted your approach to recruiting?

It’s difficult to see everyone when they’re young, it’s just part of the landscape. There are still a lot of great players and late-bloomers who may have been missed, so we keep spots open for that. We are going to recruit nationally regardless, we aren’t locked into any particular areas.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. Military Academy.

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From Fairfield Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Andy Copelan And ConnectLAX


ConnectLAX LogoAs we are all aware by now, lacrosse is no longer just the fastest game on two feet; it is also the fastest growing sport in the US. With that said, it is much more competitive to find a college roster spot than it was in the past, but with the right plan, drive, and determination, the collegiate experience as a lacrosse player is closer than you think.
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ConnectLAX has the resources to help players find schools that fit their personality, academic and athletic goals as well as their financial parameters. Players can create a list of target schools for free and coupled with their recruiting profile, can start taking control of their recruiting process with confidence and direction.
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With more and more players looking for a limited number of roster spots, coaches are looking for players that can stand out on the field and in the classroom. This means players need to work not only harder, but smarter. Training more outside of practice, not being content with natural ability and striving to reach their full potential as a player all while remaining focused on their academics.
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Hard work, strong academic standing, and versatility ultimately are key. Coaches are looking for athletic ability and speed, which comes from personal training when the stadium lights are off, not just playing in another game.
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Focus on getting your game in front of the coaches you’re interested in: know where the camps they host are and try to attend as many as you can, make sure your academic and athletic information is well-organized in one place, and be realistic and positive. If you plan ahead and execute properly, your decision will ultimately be one you cherish for a lifetime.
We sat down with Head Coach Andy Copelan of Fairfield University, a team that has year-over-year reeled in some of the most talented players in the country, to get his recruiting advice for West Coast players.
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1. What advice do you have for West Coast players interested in Division I schools, which are primarily located on the East Coast?
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Be sure to contact coaches with your highlight film, contact information and also be sure to have a list of references. More importantly, have a plan on how you plan to get noticed. Playing Division I is unrealistic without having a plan on how to go about getting in front of a coach.
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2. What is the best way for West Coast players to get on your recruiting radar?
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Again, have a plan and also be sure to show initiative. One of the best ways to do this is to attend the prospect days (camps) of their school. This will require you to travel, but this way you can guarantee you will be getting in front of that particular coach, most of whose summer schedules are challenging and many times unpredictable. Also have 5-8 schools on your list so you can make your trip worthwhile.
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3. What type of players do you primarily look for, a raw athlete or refined lacrosse player?
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The first thing we look for is speed and raw athletic ability and after that it really depends position to position. Defense for example, we want someone big, an imposing presence, but then for attack, we look for someone who is quick, unselfish, has good intuition, can play with two hands and puts up points. Something else we look for are players that have a versatile set of skills and aren’t just a “one-trick pony.” This means not relying solely on that one move that works every time, be versatile. Lastly, an important common theme in all our players that is a must are those who are mentally and physically tough. Players that have that “old school” mentality, guys who aren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves and go to work regardless of the circumstances.
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4. What areas of player development would you recommend West Coast players focus on to elevate their game?
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Something I believe to be true that I first heard from Coach Cottle when I was the assistant at Maryland, was, “if you stay the same, you get worse.” The best thing a West Coast player who is not exposed to a lot of competition can do is become a better student of the game. Watch game film and off-ball movements. It’s easy to follow the ball around, but so much more happens outside of that. Play on teams that have a variety of players from other areas to learn through experience other styles of players. Don’t fall into the “lax-bro” mentality and play only because it’s cool, play because you love the game and challenge yourself, find where the best competition is and play both with and against them.
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5. How has the accelerated recruiting landscape impacted your approach to recruiting?
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We try and not pass judgment because everyone has their reasons; we just choose not to participate in it. Right now we feel that it’s a buyer’s market for coaches, there are plenty of talented players and right now we would rather take the best 10 than the first 10. We also feel it is also important that players go through the recruiting process, look at schools and make the right decision.
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ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by Fairfield University.

College Lacrosse: “Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players” From Stevenson Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Paul Cantabene And ConnectLAX


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Recruiting Advice For West Coast Players

     College recruiting is a challenge for even the best player’s; finding the right fit on campus and on the field is no easy task. Doing so from outside the traditional lacrosse hubs is even harder given there are not as many footsteps to follow. However, with passion and a plan, you can identify and get your game in front of the right coaches.

     ConnectLAX helps you create a target list of schools that match you on and off the field and use your mobile recruiting profile to put your game at the fingertips of college coaches who are always on the go.

      Every recruiting plan is different, but yours should include the following: invest in your game and in the classroom, create a realistic list of target schools and initiate contact with coaches you are interested in, both online and by attending their camps.

      Recruiting is supply and demand and the number of roster spots is growing much slower than the number of top players. Recruits should maximize the number of available schools by getting the grades and test scores needed for eligibility. Practice with your team, practice alone, race your dog… just keep training. Coaches want to see you have the speed to play at the next level, so work with a training ladder.

      Lacrosse should be one of many factors in your college decision. Save time in the process by finding teams you can contribute to and colleges you’d attend exclusive of lacrosse. Keep an open mind. Get on campus as much as possible and try to meet the coaches and players.

      No one likes rejection, but guess what, the coaches do not simply come to you so you need to proactively reach out to them. Coaches get a lot of inbound traffic so make sure your information is well organized and in one place so they can make a decision.     Paul Cantabene We spoke with Paul Cantabene, head coach of Stevenson University, the 2013 DIII champion, about his recruiting advice for West Coast players.

 1.      What advice do you have for West Coast players interested in Division III schools, which are primarily located on the East Coast?

 Initiate contact with the schools you are interested in. It’s important to include Youtube clips and let them know where you’ll be so they can see you in person.

If a coach gets in touch with you, get back to them in a timely manner. College coaches are still surprised that players don’t always understand a response is necessary whether you are interested or not.

2.      What is the best way for West Coast players to get on your recruiting radar?

Our graduate assistant makes at least four West Coast trips a year. They hit the major recruiting tournaments. However, do not be discouraged if you are unable to participate in those.

If you are heading East and in the Baltimore area, let us know ahead of time, include your video and if we see something we like, we’ll always invite your on campus.

3.       What type of player’s do you primarily look for, a raw athlete or refined lacrosse player?

We look for speed and athletic ability. If we have a feel for a player, even if it’s based off of a single play we saw in a highlight video. We’ll reach out to that player. Even if they are not from a traditional lacrosse hub, we’ll coach him up. Sometimes we’ll move an attackman to middie. We’re looking for complete athletes.

4.       What areas of player development would you recommend West Coast players focus on to help get on par with their East Coast competition?

We feel West Coast players have really caught up a lot. Young players should focus on their stick skills and not bank on just being a good athlete. Players need to watch the game, become a student of the game, and listen to announcers point out what they’re seeing. Rewind the game to watch where the defense slides from and really try to break the game down.

5.      How has the accelerated recruiting landscape impacted your approach to recruiting?

We are getting better athletes as more late bloomers are looking for a college home. We are recruiting younger as well. The key is for players to know what they want and realize with only 61 or so Division 1 teams, they need to also be looking at Division 2 and 3, where there are hundreds of teams.

ConnectLAX.com helps players maximize their recruiting exposure with mobile recruiting profiles linked to their team roster. Recruits can create their recruiting profile and target list of colleges for free. ConnectLAX team recruiting helps coaches manage and promote their players. Learn more about registering your team at Connectlax.com/recruiting. ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by Stevenson University.

Hyperlink Stevenson University to:

http://www.connectlax.com/collegeteam/male-d3-at-stevenson_university