Tag Archives: Division I

MCLA Lacrosse: Westminster Men’s Lacrosse Moves Up To Division I For 2014 Season


The Westminster College men’s lacrosse team will move to Division 1 of the Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) for the 2014 season, head coach Mason Goodhand announced today. Westminster is currently a Division 2 member and will compete for a second national championship at that level this spring.

Westminster has been a D2 member since the program started in 2007. The Griffins won the D2 National Championship in 2008 and have qualified for the national tournament every year. They will remain a member of the Rocky Mountain Lacrosse Conference and join current D1 members: Brigham Young, Colorado State, Colorado, Utah, Utah State and New Mexico.

“Division 1 of the Rocky Mountain Conference is one of the toughest in the MCLA,” Goodhand stated. “Our staff is very excited for this opportunity and we’re traveling to get an early dose this year when we slip into Boulder and Ft Collins early this season.”

Since men’s lacrosse was started at Westminster in 2007, the Griffins have gone 89-34 overall while compiling a 22-2 mark in league games. They have won the conference championship four times in the six years while making the championship game every year.

NCAA Lacrosse: “Lacrosse Magazine” Releases 2012 “Preseason NCAA Div Women’s Lacrosse” Rankings Featuring #1 Northwestern Followed By Maryland, North Carolina, Duke And Florida; Stanford Ranked #9 And Notre Dame #18


NCAA Division I Women

1. Northwestern
2. Maryland
3. North Carolina
4. Duke
5. Florida
6. Virginia
7. Princeton
8. Boston College
9. Stanford
10. Loyola
11. James Madison
12. Penn
13. Dartmouth
14. Syracuse
15. Penn State
16. Vanderbilt
17. Georgetown
18. Notre Dame
19. Albany
20. Harvard

Preseason Player of the Year: Shannon Smith, Northwestern

NCAA Lacrosse Recruiting: “Ivy League Lacrosse” Schools Now Offer “Financial Aid Awards” That Are Superior To “NCAA Div I Lacrosse Scholarships”


“…the new, plentiful financial aid awards have permitted Ivy League coaches to compete head-to-head in the same recruiting arena as some big-time scholarship programs. And in sports like baseball, soccer, wrestling or lacrosse, where most athletic scholarships are split into partial scholarships worth a half or a quarter of the cost to attend, it is not uncommon for an Ivy League financial aid package to be superior to the athletic scholarship…”

At most Ivy League institutions, families earning less than about $65,000 annually are now asked to make no contribution to their children’s education. Families making $65,000 to $180,000 might be expected to pay 10 percent to 18 percent of their annual income on a sliding scale. Ten years ago, such families would have been expected to pay almost twice as much, and their child would probably have accumulated a debt of about $25,000 after four years.

The current guidelines vary from institution to institution and can be affected by multiple factors, but each Ivy League member has significantly increased aid packages and has shown noteworthy largess. And in another unprecedented move, a vast majority will match the aid package offered by another Ivy League member. That makes the financial aid awards in the Ivy League generally the most generous of any group of colleges or universities in the United States.

For more:  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/23/sports/financial-aid-changes-game-as-sports-teams-in-ivies-rise.html

California Girls Lacrosse Tournaments: “Sand Storm 2012” On Jan 14-15 Will Feature 80-Plus ClubTeams From 21 States In Four Divisions; 30 NCAA Div I-III Recruiters To Attend


Sand Storm 2012, presented by Synapse Sports and Lax West, will be held Jan. 14-15 at the fabulous Empire Polo Club, nestled in the Palm Springs desert valley below the picturesque San Jacinto Mountains, and featuring 20 impeccably maintained fields. Competition on the girls’ side will be held in the Elite, Varsity, JV and Riser divisions while the boys’ side will feature action in Elite, High School, Under-15, Under-13 and Under-11. Sponsored by STX and Gatorade, Sand Storm annually attracts a large throng of women’s lacrosse recruiters from the Division I, II and III levels. More than 30 women’s programs have already committed to attend in 2012 including Marquette, San Diego State and USC who have a recently added Varsity programs, as well as Brown, UC Berkeley, Columbia, Denver, Harvard, Navy, Oregon, Stanford and Yale to name a few. Crista Samaras, director of the national lacrosse club XTEAM, will be bringing 10 teams filled with players from 21 different states to Sand Storm 2012. Samaras liked the tournament so much she decided to use Sand Storm as the key winter training and recruiting weekend for XTEAM, complete with staff meetings and membership celebration events. “Sand Storm has been an epic event since its inception five years ago. The venue is unprecedented in a place where the weather is reliable,” Samaras said. “The coalition of non-traditional teams attending is strong and the growing support of college coaches interested in the budding talent makes it a no-brainer. Palm Springs does a great job of being the perfect place and Synapse delivers the best experience for players, coaches and fans.”

Growth Of NCAA Lacrosse: University Of Michigan Lacrosse Will Spend Up To “$10 Million” On Men’s And Women’s Varsity Lacrosse Facilities, Joining Penn State And Florida In Upgrading Programs As Lacrosse Enters “Big-Time College Athletics”


The University of Michigan said Wednesday that it will spend up to $10 million on men’s and women’s varsity lacrosse facilities, joining Penn State and the University of Florida as traditional college athletic powers pouring resources into the sport.

I think that’s the biggest news in our sport since we went to a Final Four 20 years ago,” said Virginia coach Dom Starsia, who set the Division I career record for wins at 327 last weekend. “If Michigan provides a little spark, 10 years from now you could see the Big 10, Pac-10. We could see a dramatic change in the game.”

College lacrosse is getting a $10 million dose of big-time athletics as it grows from the province of private schools in the Northeast into a magnet for corporate sponsorships and alumni donations.

The interest state schools — with their booster clubs, conference television packages and football revenue — are paying lacrosse may threaten the dominance that private schools such as Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, have enjoyed.

“We are going to bring the money, coaching talent and recruiting that we believe will allow us to assume a position of national prominence in the sport,” Michigan Athletic Director Dave Brandon, 59, said in a telephone interview.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association’s lacrosse tournaments wind up this weekend. Virginia, Denver, Maryland and Duke are competing in Baltimore for the men’s championship; Maryland, Duke, North Carolina and Northwestern are playing in Stony Brook, New York, for the women’s title.

Michigan’s decision to elevate its club lacrosse teams has business sense behind it, said Brandon, who served as chief executive officer of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Domino’s Pizza Inc. (DPZ) from 1999 to 2010.

“The University of Florida spent $15 million on a stadium and fielded its first varsity women’s team two years ago. The Gators were ranked as high as No. 2 this season and made it into the quarterfinals of the tournament.

Penn State, with 38,500 undergrad students on its main campus, hired Tambroni in June 2010 and is spending about $2 million annually to fund its lacrosse teams.

Denver made the men’s tournament in its eighth year competing in Division I, the sport’s highest level, and this year hosted Villanova University in the first NCAA tournament game played west of the Mississippi River.

For more:  http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-05-27/lacrosse-private-party-is-crashed-by-michigan-wolverines-with-10-million.html

NCAA Lacrosse: Video Highlights Of 2011 NCAA Men’s Lacrosse National Championship Selection Show


Growth Of Western NCAA Lacrosse: Colorado Women’s Lacrosse Will Not Be Elevated To Varsity Program Status Anytime Soon As University Of Colorado’s New $21 Million TV Contract Will Pay Down Expenses And Improve Athletic Infrastructure First


 

Colorado is going to get about $21 million a year from the Pac-12’s new TV contracts, starting in two years. This represents 250 percent more than it made in the old Big 12 Conference

Women’s lacrosse has the inside edge when that happens. Colorado high schools are a hotbed for college women’s lacrosse programs. Eight girls are expected to get Division I scholarships this spring, and Colorado would be a logical eighth conference member in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. The league includes the three current Pac-10 schools playing women’s lacrosse — Stanford, Oregon and California — plus Denver, which would provide a natural rivalry.

Before Colorado will consider adding a Women’s Lacrosse Program, they must:

  • Pay $5.5 million left from an $8 million loan in 2006 which paid off former football coach Gary Barnett’s contract
  • Pay Boise State for the hiring of football coach Dan Hawkins
  • Pay the settled lawsuit from CU’s recruiting ordeal years ago
  • CU owes the Big 12 a $6 million exit fee for leaving the conference to join the Pac-12
  • Pay $9 million for 2011-12 scholarships that have risen 9 percent for in-state students and 4 to 5 percent for out-of-state students
  • Pay for increased athletic team travel costs including fuel costs tha increased $250,000
  • Pay for upgrades to Folsom Field’s Flatirons Club, the antiquated donor seating area below the press box
  • Pay for infrastructure costs including Video boards, restrooms and concession stands

The Pac-12’s TV contracts don’t fund until the 2012-13 school year. Once Colorado becomes more financially solvent on a year- to-year basis, Bohn said adding a sport can be considered.