Tag Archives: High School

US Lacrosse Announces “2013 Physical Education And Soft Stick Lacrosse Equipment Grants” To 49 Western Middle Schools And High Schools


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US Lacrosse today announced that 136 schools and civic organizations across 38 states have been selected as 2013 Physical Education and Soft Stick Lacrosse Equipment Grant recipients. Each organization will receive modified “soft” lacrosse sticks and balls, as well as instructional guides and DVDs to help support the introduction of the sport in their curriculums.

In addition, US Lacrosse has awarded eight workshop grants to school districts and community-based organizations in which US Lacrosse trainers provide in-service training. Each of these workshops could have up to 30 schools and organizations in attendance, each of which also receives a full set of soft stick equipment. Workshops were awarded to school districts and organizations in Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Arkansas, Nebraska, Florida, Texas and Oklahoma.

In addition, US Lacrosse has awarded eight workshop grants to school districts and community-based organizations in which US Lacrosse trainers provide in-service training. Each of these workshops could have up to 30 schools and organizations in attendance, each of which also receives a full set of soft stick equipment. Workshops were awarded to school districts and organizations in Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Arkansas, Nebraska, Florida, Texas and Oklahoma.

Central Middle School of Science – Anchorage, Alaska

Ardis Ann Middle School – Bentonville, Ariz.
Rite of Passage-Canyon State Academy – Queen Creek, Ariz.

Grant School – Redding, Calif.
University Preparatory School – Redding, Calif.
College Park High School – Pleasant Hill, Calif.
Sycamore Ridge School – San Diego, Calif.
Stellar K-12 Charter School – Redding, Calif.
Boulder Creek School – Redding, Calif.
Ventura Family YMCA – Ventura, Calif.
Toyon Middle School – Valley Springs, Calif.
Montecito Family YMCA – Santa Barbara, Calif.
Walnut Canyon Elementary School – Moorpark, Calif.
James R. Cowan Fundamental School – Sacramento, Calif.
Lompoc Family YMCA – Lompoc, Calif.
Mountain View Middle School – Redding, Calif.
Redding Recreation – Redding, Calif.
Summit Intermediate School – Etiwanda, Calif.
Calahan Elementary School – North Hollywood, Calif.
Santa Barbara Family YMCA – Santa Barbara, Calif.

Lotus 88/Lightning Stick Society – Westminster, Colo.
Loveland Lacrosse Club – Loveland, Colo.

Emmett School District – Emmett, Idaho

Berwyn Park District – Berwyn Bombers Lacrosse – Berwyn, Ill.
Union Ridge School District 86 – Harwood Heights, Ill.
Holy Trinity Catholic School – Fairview Heights, Ill.
Burr Ridge Middle School – Westmont, Ill.

YMCA of Greater Indianapolis – Fishers, Ind.
Indiana Chapter – Zionsville, Ind.

Prince of Peace Catholic School – Olathe, Kan.
Morris County Schools – Council Grove, Kan.

Mathews-Dickey Boys & Girls Club – St. Louis, Mo.
De La Salle Middle School – St. Louis, Mo.
Siegrist Elementary – Platte City, Mo.

YMCA of Lincoln NE – Lincoln, Neb.
Norris Middle School – Firth, Neb.
Westside Middle School – Omaha, Neb.

Pecos Valley Athletics Assoc. – Roswell, N.M.

Corvallis Lacrosse – Corvallis, Ore.
Wilson Youth Girls Lacrosse, Inc. – Portland, Ore.

Hill Country Lacrosse – Boerne, Texas
Regents School of Austin – Austin, Texas
Uplift Williams Preparatory – Dallas, Texas
Faith West Academy – Katy, Texas
Wellington Elementary School – Flower Mound, Texas
Mountainview Elementary School – Waco, Texas
Tennyson Middle School – Waco, Texas
Frisco Lacrosse Association – Frisco, Texas

Queen Anne Quick Styx – Seattle, Wash.

http://www.uslacrosse.org/TopNav/NewsandMedia/PressReleases/SoftStickLacrosseGrantsAwarded.aspx

Growth Of Lacrosse: Utah Legislature Passes Bill “Mandating” Lacrosse Club Teams Be Allowed Use Of High School Fields “Without Fees”


“…some high school club lacrosse teams are being charged $1,000 dollars a game to use the school’s facilities and felt that was unfair treatment when other clubs in the school can use the facilities for no charge…”

The Utah House of Representatives passed a bill Thursday that will allow High School Club teams to use high school fields for their practices and games. While some schools allow club sports or non UHSAA sanctioned sports, such as lacrosse, to use school facilities for free, others are charging clubs a fee. Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, would like to get rid of those fees.

“What we are finding is that many schools are restricting the use of the playing fields,” said Sandstrom. “These kids deserve access to their fields.”

Sandstrom noted that some high school club lacrosse teams are being charged $1,000 dollars a game to use the school’s facilities and felt that was unfair treatment when other clubs in the school can use the facilities for no charge.

The clubs would not have priority over UHSAA sanctioned practices or games, meaning a club lacrosse match could not take priority over a UHSAA girls soccer game.

For more: http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/legislature/article_8e5da8e3-226c-52bc-a9e9-5947e213f25a.html

Lacrosse Video Streaming: “YourSports.com” Is Pioneering “Crowdfunded” Video Broadcasting To Benefit High School And College Lacrosse Programs And Fans (Video)


Any game that isn't on TV today can now be crowdfunded and streamed online with YourSports- and all teams will finally get paid for it.

 

California High School Lacrosse: Boys And Girls Lacrosse Participation Increases 45% From 2006-2008 According To CIF Survey


Participation was up in both boys' and girls' sports, the survey found. Lacrosse registered the biggest gain with a 45% increase in participation among both boys and girls. Other boys' sports with notable increases were swimming (14.1%), volleyball (7.6%) and wrestling (6.5%). Track and field experienced the biggest growth among girls' sports with a 7.5% increase, followed closely by swimming and diving (7.3%).

Participation was up in both boys' and girls' sports, the survey found. Lacrosse registered the biggest gain with a 45% increase in participation among both boys and girls. Other boys' sports with notable increases were swimming (14.1%), volleyball (7.6%) and wrestling (6.5%). Track and field experienced the biggest growth among girls' sports with a 7.5% increase, followed closely by swimming and diving (7.3%). Photo by LaxBuzz.

(From LATimesBlog) Track and field also replaces soccer as the most popular sport for girls with 41,736 participants. Football remains the top sport for boys–despite a 3.4% drop in participation–with 104,224 participants. Track and field is a distant second with 51,689 participants, followed by basketball (42,521) and baseball (42,064).

According to the 2009 California Interscholastic Federation Sports Participation Survey, there were a total of 736,727 high school athletes participating in sports last year, an increase of 1,224–or 1.6%–from the last survey conducted two years ago.

“The increase, although slight, is still a testament to the fact that our California schools and student-athletes are very much interested in increasing the athletic programs we have,” CIF Executive Director Marie Ishida said in a statement.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/varsitytimesinsider/2009/08/participation-in-athletics-registers-small-uptick-in-california.html

High School Lacrosse Participation: Popularity Continues To Increase As NCAA Men’s Division I Championship This Weekend Showcases Sport


“Lacrosse has taken off because it combines the hitting of football, the speed of basketball, and requires the endurance of soccer,” says Kyle Harrison, who led Johns Hopkins to a national championship in 2005 and who won that year’s Tewaaraton Trophy as the country’s best male player.

lacrosse participation in high school

Until recently, lacrosse — America’s other stick and ball sport — was rarely on TV and only its championship games generated much in the way of media coverage. It was mostly played on the East Coast, and it was often viewed as a game for private-school kids. Some of the game’s most electrifying athletes — Gary and Paul Gait; Casey, Ryan and Michael Powell — were little known outside core followers. The sole exception may be Jim Brown, the former Cleveland Browns running back who played lacrosse at Syracuse University.

(From Wall Street Journal Article)   These days the sport is showing serious growth. Participation in high school lacrosse has about doubled this decade, to a total of 143,946 boys and girls playing on high school lacrosse teams in the 2007-08 school year, according to the National Federation of State High School Associations, which tracks participation by sport. In 2000-01, there were 74,225 high school lacrosse players.

And the fervor goes beyond high schools. A 2007 survey by the National Sporting Goods Association found an estimated 1.2 million Americans over age 7 had played lacrosse within the previous year — an increase of 40% since 1999.

Johns Hopkins is one of the 56 men’s Division 1 college lacrosse teams, based on NCAA data from the 2007-08 season. Including Divisions II and III, there are some 239 men’s college lacrosse teams nationwide with 8,900 athletes, double the number of participants two decades ago. On the women’s side, there are now more than 300 college lacrosse programs across Division I, II and III, according to the NCAA, triple the number seen two decades ago.

It’s also growing when compared to other sports. In the 2007-08 school year, 17 colleges added women’s lacrosse, more than any other sport. Meanwhile, a dozen men’s teams were added in 2007-08, far more than sports like basketball, which added three teams; football, which added two and baseball, which added just one team.

Lacrosse is a fast-paced running and shooting game created by American Indians. Migrating south from Canada in the 19th century, it won followers in the Northeast; New York University fielded the first college team in 1877.

A number of factors have contributed to the sport’s growth, including an increase in media coverage, the availability of athletic scholarships and the sport’s growing appeal at schools west of the Mississippi.

Indeed, the game has steadily migrated as former players and coaches moved West. Lacrosse Magazine says that of the 2,427 men’s lacrosse players on D-I rosters in 2009, 118 players came from five key Western states: California (55); Colorado (37); Washington (13); (Arizona (9) and Oregon (4.)

“The game has just exploded in the three years that I’ve lived in San Diego,” says Dave Herman, the varsity boys’ lacrosse coach at Francis Parker School in San Diego.

The availability of college scholarships is also a draw. Chuck Cohen, who helped launch a youth league in Orangetown, N.Y., that has grown from 70 boys in grades five through eight to more than 300 boys and girls from first to eighth grades, says, “Many of the D-1 teams are offering college scholarships, and there are tournaments and recruiting camps where college coaches can watch the kids play.”

The Web has played a crucial role, says Steve Stenersen, CEO of US Lacrosse, the sport’s governing body. “There’s tons of stuff on YouTube, as well as coverage on a variety of news and alternative sites.”

The media, specifically cable TV networks such as ESPN, have also popularized the sport. “It’s always been considered an Eastern sport, but now it’s spreading nationwide,” says Steve Herbst, executive vice president of CBS College Sports Network, which has carried the sport for six years.

Lacrosse has been welcoming to women. Forty years ago, there wasn’t a single girls high school lacrosse team; in the 2007-08 school year, there were over 1,600 high school programs with more than 60,000 players in 23 states. Undoubtedly, many will be watching Northwestern University, based in Evanston, Ill., compete this weekend for its fifth consecutive national women’s championship.

As might be expected, the states with the most popular programs are those where the sport has traditionally been popular. New York has the most, followed by New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Maryland. But next on the list is California, with 110 high school teams and over 3,000 women’s lacrosse players.

Lacrosse still trails far behind more traditional sports and it remains to be seen whether the sport will ever catch up in popularity. The number of high school lacrosse players, at about 144,000, is just a fraction of the participation seen in football, with 1.1 million high school athletes; basketball and track and field, both with just over a million players, and soccer, with 730,000, as of the 2007-08 school year.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124278087620937367.htmlWrite to Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg at jeffrey.trachtenberg@wsj.com and Kelly Evans at kelly.evans@wsj.com

California High School Lacrosse Scores For March 30


laxpower15

High School Boys

CA Archbishop Mitty 6, Mountain View 5
CA Bellarmine Prep 16, Los Gatos 5
CA Birmingham 13, Jordan 0
CA Burlingame 16, Saratoga 3
CA Cordova-Folsom 9, Pleasant Grove 1
CA Corona Del Mar 16, Beckman 1
CA Eastlake 22, Montgomery 3
CA Foothills Christian 14, Chula Vista 3
CA Irvine HS 11, University Irvine 4
CA Laguna Hills 16, San Juan Hills 4
CA Marina 11, Aliso Niguel 7
CA Menlo-Atherton 18, Sacred Heart Prep 5
CA Oak Park 8, Oaks Christian 2
CA Otay Ranch 4, Bonita Vista 3
CA Saint Ignatius Prep 18, Redwood 6
CA St John Bosco 4, Anaheim Servite 3 (OT)
CA University SF 12, Branson 3

High School Girls

CA Beckman 19, Corona Del Mar 8
CA Granite Hills 10, Mission Hills 2
CA Laguna Hills 19, San Juan Hills 7
CA Poway 11, Valley Center 9
CA Rancho Bernardo 19, Francis Parker School 2
CA Santa Margarita Catholic 11, JSerra Catholic 8
CA St. Ignatius Prep, CA 16, Palo Alto 0
CA University HS, Irvine 11, Irvine 4
CA Westview, CA 10, Santa Fe Christian 7

http://www.laxpower.com/common/scoreboard.php

California High School Lacrosse Scores From March 26


laxpower10
Boys High School Results
CA Acalanes 14, Clayton Valley 3
CA Berkeley 16, Bishop O’Dowd 5
CA Culver City 12, Oak Park 11
CA El Toro 9, Woodbridge 3
CA Foothill-Santa Ana 18, Trabuco Hills 2
CA Granite Hills 9, Santana 6
CA Grossmont 15, Monte Vista-Spg Valley 8
CA Hilltop 11, Montgomery 6
CA La Jolla HS 6, Bishop’s School 5
CA Las Lomas 10, Campolindo 2
CA Los Alamitos 15, Esperanza 1
CA Otay Ranch 18, Chula Vista 0
CA Santa Margarita Cath 16, Anaheim Servite 3
CA South Gate 11, Birmingham 3
CA Valhalla 15, El Capitan 2
Girls High School Results
CA Los Alamitos 17, Sage Hill 5
CA Redondo Union 9, Palos Verdes 8 (OT)

http://www.laxpower.com/common/scoreboard.php