Tag Archives: Lacrosse Programs

NAIA Lacrosse: St. Gregory’s University (OK) Adds Men’s Lacrosse As Varsity Sport In 2014-15; Growth Of Lacrosse In State Cited As Primary Reason


St. Gregory's Men's LacrosseLacrosse has grown in popularity in Oklahoma, part of a larger national trend. More than 100,000 boys participate in high school lacrosse nationally, according to the NFHS.

It is not currently recognized as one of the NAIA’s championship programs, but there are more than 30 NAIA schools offering men’s lacrosse. Potter said SGU will play a hybrid of NAIA, NCAA and college club teams. The Cavaliers will compete at Fr. Victor Roberts Field, currently the home venue of the men’s and women’s soccer teams.

“We are beginning to see several high schools in our region add lacrosse, so we want to be proactive in being able to offer it here,” said Potter, who indicated that women’s lacrosse may be looked at as a future addition to SGU’s athletic offerings.

St. Gregory’s University will add three varsity sports for the start of the 2014-2015 academic year, athletics director Jeff Potter announced Wednesday. Men’s and women’s swimming and diving in addition to men’s lacrosse will bring SGU’s total offering of athletics programs to 17.

Potter said the university has already begun a search to fill the staffing needs of all three sports.

“Swimming and diving is an underserved sport in our region, and lacrosse has been identified as one of the most rapidly growing games in the United States,” said SGU President Greg Main. “We are excited to be adding these programs and look forward to providing SGU’s quality educational experience to future students who may be interested in them.”

SGU joins Oklahoma Baptist as the only varsity collegiate swim teams in Oklahoma. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), of which SGU is a member, has sponsored swimming since the 1950s. Swimming is similar to track and field in that athletes qualify for the NAIA’s national meet by meeting time standards.

According to the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), approximately 33,000 high school students at more than 900 schools participate in swimming programs in Oklahoma’s six-state region.

“We feel like there are several potential students we can attract to SGU who may otherwise leave the state to continue their careers collegiately,” Potter said.

SGU added men’s golf to its list of athletics programs earlier this year and men’s and women’s track, men’s and women’s cross country and women’s golf in 2012.

For more:  http://www.sgucavaliers.com/article/577.php

US Lacrosse Equipment Grants Assist Western States In Establishing High School And Club Boys And Girls Lacrosse Programs With $1,440,000 To Date


 

 

 

 

 

 

us-lacrosse1

Since the inception of the Equipment Grant Program, US Lacrosse has granted equipment to 260 fledgling lacrosse programs with the retail value of more then $1,440,000.

Lacrosse programs applying for a grant must show a demonstrated financial need and priority is given to those residing in a state or region where lacrosse opportunities are currently limited or absent. Applicants can choose from a girls’ package, boys’ package, program (boys’ and girls’) package or a physical education program package.

http://www.laxpower.com/laxnews/news.php?story=11971

Thirty-six lacrosse organizations in 25 states will receive US Lacrosse Equipment Grants this year. The US Lacrosse Equipment Grant Program, in its tenth year, is an annual offering of US Lacrosse. Since the inception of the Equipment Grant Program, US Lacrosse has granted equipment to 260 fledgling lacrosse programs with the retail value of more then $1,440,000.

The boys’ lacrosse team at Harlan Community Academy High School (Chicago, Ill.) received an equipment grant in 2007. “Because of this grant, many firsts for Harlan lacrosse occurred,” said Greg Simmons, head boys’ lacrosse coach at Harlan. “We became the first public school on the south side of Chicago with a lacrosse program and the fifth school in the Chicago public school system with a boys’ lacrosse program. In addition, Harlan became the first predominately African American school in Chicago with a program and the only predominately African American school in the state of Illinois with a lacrosse program. Furthermore, by my estimation, Harlan became the one of twenty (or so) public school programs in the nation whose population was predominately African American.”

“None of this would have been possible if not for the generous support of US Lacrosse. The players, coaching staff and I thank the organization from the bottom of our hearts for the opportunities this grant has provided our school.”

Steve Stenersen, president and CEO of US Lacrosse, noted that “While US Lacrosse continues to increase its investment in this program each year, we’re also fortunate to benefit from the generous contributions of equipment from manufacturers Brine, Warrior, STX, Cascade and Shamrock which enable us to do so much more.”

Lacrosse programs applying for a grant must show a demonstrated financial need and priority is given to those residing in a state or region where lacrosse opportunities are currently limited or absent. Applicants can choose from a girls’ package, boys’ package, program (boys’ and girls’) package or a physical education program package.

The girls’ package includes 24 field player sticks, 24 pairs of protective eyewear, 1 goalie stick and full protective equipment for 1 goalie (including helmet).

The boys’ package includes 24 field player sticks and 1 goalie stick, full protective equipment for 24 field players and 1 goalie (gloves, arm guards, shoulder pads, and helmets).

The program package includes 20 field girls’ player sticks, 20 pairs of protective eyewear, 1 girls’ goalie stick, full protective equipment for 1 girls’ goalie (including helmet), 20 boys’ field player sticks, 1 boys’ goalie stick, full protective equipment for 20 boys’ field players and 1 goalie (gloves, arm guards, shoulder pads, and helmets).

The physical education program package includes 30 physical education soft lacrosse sticks and 30 balls.

The following programs have been awarded grants for the 2008 cycle of the US Lacrosse Equipment Grant Program:

Boys’ Packages
Loftis Middle School Club Lacrosse – Hixson, TN
Andover Youth Lacrosse Association – Wichita, KS
North Coast Youth Lacrosse Club – Carlsbad, CA
Northeast Youth Lacrosse – Chapel Hill, NC
Flagstaff Lacrosse – Fairhope, AZ
Orr Academy High School – Chicago, IL
San Fernando Valley Lacrosse – Northridge, CA
City of Charleston Recreation Department – Daniel Island, SC
Susan Chlebowski – New Berlin, PA
Norcross High School Boys Lacrosse – Norcross, GA
Stowe Boys Youth Lacrosse – Stowe, VT
Springfield Lacrosse Club – Springfield, NJ

Program Packages
The Marshal Family YMCA – Evans, GA
Winter Garden Youth Lacrosse League – Winter Garden, FL
Juneau Lacrosse – Juneau, AK
City Lacrosse – Buffalo, NY
Gainesville Lacrosse Association – Gainesville, FL
Lower Alabama Youth – Birmingham, AL
Bethel Recreation Department – Bethel, ME
Brookfield Lacrosse Association – Brookfield, WI
New Orleans College Prep – New Orleans, LA

Girls’ Packages
Farmington High School Girls Club Team – Farmington, MN
Harmony Hills ES – Silver Spring, MD
Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy – Melbourne, FL
KIPP Ujima Village Academy – Baltimore, MD
Lacrosse of Pueblo – Pueblo, CO
Olmsted Academy South Girls Lacrosse Club – Louisville, KY
Three Rivers Lacrosse Club – Richland, WA
Williamsburg Collegiate Charter School – Brooklyn, NY
Villa Maria Academy – Erie, PA

Physical Education Packages
Alimacani Elementary School – Jacksonville, FL
Buchanan High School – Buchanan, MI
Dunn Elementary School – Louisville, KY
Maryville Middle School – Maryville, TN
Stuart R. Paddock Elementary School – Palatine, IL
Tarwater Elementary School – Chandler, AZ

Lacrosse In The “Inner-City”: “Give Kids A Lacrosse Stick And The Chance To Play Their Way To A Better Education…”


FROM A “TIME MAGAZINE ARTICLE”….

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“…Nevermind that they’d never seen a lacrosse game, much less played in one; Anderson believes in giving students a lacrosse stick and the chance to play their way to a better education…”

“…With the backdrop of classic Harlem brownstones behind them, the students split into lines and learned basic skills, such as passing and scooping the ball, while Turco called out instructions. “I never see them listen to anyone like this,” said Anderson from the sidelines. “This is really something.”

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1859448,00.html 

“…It should come as no surprise, then, that the 24 children in Korn’s class had never seen a lacrosse stick before she introduced one. The predominantly white sport popular at Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic universities requires two things New York City public schools don’t have: money and fields. But given the election, it was, after all, a week of firsts. “All of our students were excited about the election,” said Anderson. “For us educators, Obama’s victory means that when we tell these students that they can do anything, it’s not hyperbole.” And so, on an unseasonably warm Friday afternoon, 35 middle-school students showed up to learn how to play lacrosse.

Nevermind that they’d never seen a lacrosse game, much less played in one; Anderson believes in giving students a lacrosse stick and the chance to play their way to a better education. “Ideally, I want to see about 60 percent of the kids who started with us at go on to boarding schools or private schools,” says Anderson. Enter Korn’s father, Rick, a former player who helped coach his own son to the Division-I level; Bob Turco, a Harlem-born lacrosse coaching legend who played his way to Washington and Lee University in the ’70s; and Ross Turco, Bob’s son and former high school All-America and D-I player who now coaches at Peddie, an elite boarding school in Hightstown, New Jersey. The well-connected trio, along with the school’s director of advancement, Michael Pages, have volunteered to hold practices twice a week, using donated equipment.

“This is about your will,” Bob Turco said to rookie players as they gathered around him on the school’s small turf playground. “Your will to accomplish something you don’t understand and just say, ‘I’m going to prove I can do this.’ ” With the backdrop of classic Harlem brownstones behind them, the students split into lines and learned basic skills, such as passing and scooping the ball, while Turco called out instructions. “I never see them listen to anyone like this,” said Anderson from the sidelines. “This is really something.”

As the school director’s vision unfolded in front of him, the line between the impossible and the inevitable seemed to fade for the second time in a week. Many of the students had come to school Wednesday after going to the voting booths with their parents, while others had stayed out late to listen to Obama’s victory speech broadcast over loudspeakers near 125th Street. That same day they wrote letters to the president-elect. “I want to change things, too”, wrote Fortune Nbumbo, 7. Tatiana Jones, 9, told Obama, “You open the door not just for me, but for everybody.” For the students at FLI, the definition of leadership is clearer than it’s ever been, and the playing field, even if it’s a patch of turf between two brick walls, is slowly leveling out.

Men’s And Women’s Lacrosse “Graduation Success Rate” At Or Near Top Of All College Athletic Programs


http://www.laxpower.com/laxnews/news.php?story=11755 

According to the NCAA Graduation Success Rate (GSR) data, which were released this week, lacrosse again fares extremely well compared to other sports for the 1998-2001 cohorts among schools in Division I (combined). Male lacrosse players had a GSR of 88%, which was highest among the sports in the survey, and had the second highest federal graduation rate at 74% (fencing was highest). Female lacrosse players were tied for third in GSR at 94% and placed second with federal rate of 84%.
GSR and the perhaps more familiar federal graduation rate data are shown in the table below by gender and sport. Results for the three previous groups of cohorts are also shown. For more information on the GSR, please see the NCAA web site and their release, which appears following the four data tables.
[Note: The federal rate uses fall cohorts as a base, and from that a very small number of exclusions are made for deaths, military service, participation in church missions, etc. On the other hand, the GSR begins with the same cohort but adds freshmen who enter in January, and transfers from two- and four-year colleges. It also includes non-scholarship athletes at schools not offering athletic aid. Finally, the GSR excludes students who left school while academically eligible. The upshot for the 1998-2001 cohort is that about 27,000 students are included in the GSR and not in the federal rate, and roughly 19,000 more students are excluded from the GSR but included in the federal rate.]

 

 

1998-2001 Cohorts Four-Class Average

Men’s Sports Women’s Sports
Sport NCAA GSR Federal Rate Sport NCAA GSR Federal Rate
Lacrosse 88% 74% Skiing 96% 73%
Water Polo 87% 71% Gymnastics 95% 85%
Fencing 86% 78% Field Hockey 94% 81%
Gymnastics 86% 70% Lacrosse 94% 84%
Ice Hockey 83% 64% Crew/Rowing 91% 75%
Swimming 83% 69% Fencing 90% 81%
Tennis 83% 64% Ice Hockey 90% 74%
Volleyball 83% 69% Swimming 90% 75%
Skiing 82% 73% Soccer 89% 71%
Rifle 80% 60% Tennis 89% 70%
Golf 79% 61% Volleyball 88% 71%
Soccer 79% 58% Golf 87% 71%
CC/Track 74% 60% Softball 86% 70%
Wrestling 72% 54% Water Polo 86% 76%
Baseball 68% 47% CC/Track 84% 70%
Football (FBS) 67% 55% Basketball 82% 64%
Football (FCS) 65% 54% Rifle 82% 64%
Basketball 62% 46% Bowling 68% 57%
Average 78.2% 62.6%   87.8% 72.9%

 

 

 

 

Berkeley, East Bay To Dedicate New $7 Million Sports Park For Lacrosse And Other Sports


"...will host 17,000 soccer, rugby, lacrosse, baseball and softball players each year."

BERKELEY — Let the games begin.

Five years ago, a handful of East Bay cities and the East Bay Regional Park District came together with a pledge to build five new sports fields at the foot of Gilman Street in Berkeley.

On Saturday, the leaders of those cities and other politicians will cut the ribbon at the new $7 million sports complex that will host 17,000 soccer, rugby, lacrosse, baseball and softball players each year.

“Youth soccer is desperate for more fields. Not only are the new facilities great, but they also help to take the pressure off our existing fields, improving the athletic experience for thousands of children in the region,” said Steven Morrison, general manager of the Albany-Berkeley Soccer Club.

The grand opening of the sports complex will be celebrated by elected officials, community leaders and sports enthusiasts at 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

The five East Bay cities entered into a joint powers agreement in late 2003 to develop a regional sports complex at the intersection of Interstate 80 and Gilman Street in northwest Berkeley. The property was acquired by the park district through a variety of funding.

On Saturday, speakers will include master of ceremonies and park district General Manager Pat O’Brien; Assemblymember Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley; Albany Mayor Robert Lieber; Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates; El Cerrito Mayor William C. Jones; Emeryville Mayor Ken Bukowski; Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin; a representative from California State Parks; park district board member Nancy Skinner; and sports and environmental leaders.

 Officially named the Tom Bates Regional Sports Facility, the complex will include two lighted synthetic fields, built to accommodate soccer, rugby and lacrosse, and three nonlighted grass fields that can be used for baseball. Those will be ready for play in spring 2009.

The infields on the grass fields will be completed when funds become available, said Julie Sinai, Bates’ chief of staff.

Some of the fields opened in August.

“Within the last couple weeks, they started having kids practice on them,” she said.

The complex replaces a site that was used for overflow parking for events such as the Berkeley Kite Festival and by Golden Gate Fields employees. The fields are located in, and will be leased by, the city of Berkeley, but will be regionally accessible.

“The park district is committed to encouraging youths to be active outdoors, and so is quite pleased to work with the city of Berkeley on such a greatly needed sports facility,” O’Brien said.

The project includes a grass strip on the west side of the fields that will filter all stormwater runoff from the synthetic turf fields of urban contaminants and particulates before it drains into the Bay.

Synthetic turf fields do not require water or mowing, which uses fuel, drastically reduce the carbon footprint of the fields.

Grey water pipes will allow the grass fields to be watered with reclaimed grey water as soon as East Bay Municipal Utility District makes that service available.

The grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place on the north synthetic turf field from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday at 400 Gilman St.

http://www.insidebayarea.com/oaklandtribune/localnews/ci_10383413

Pacific Ridge School In Carlsbad Building State-of-the-Art Lacrosse/Athletic Complex


 

Pacific Ridge athletic director Darren Lawlor stands by a soccer goal frame on an empty lot that will eventually become the school’s soccer and lacrosse field. Angela Cesere | Union-Tribune

Pacific Ridge athletic director Darren Lawlor stands by a soccer goal frame on an empty lot that will eventually become the school’s soccer and lacrosse field. Angela Cesere | Union-Tribune

http://www.todayslocalnews.com/?sect=sports&p=5631

It may look like a giant expanse of weeds and thickets, but to Darren Lawlor, it’s a blank canvas.

In eight months, crews will break ground, transforming the desolate field off Palomar Airport Road into a state-of-the-art athletic center, complete with a basketball auditorium and outdoor soccer/lacrosse field.

This is just another step in Lawlor’s plan to build an athletic program from scratch at the new Pacific Ridge School, an independent, nonprofit school in Carlsbad.

“It’s been a challenge to put together all the moving parts,” said Lawlor, who was hired as the fledgling school’s athletic director in June 2007 before its first year of instruction. “We’re very blessed to have all this land in North County.”

Lawlor, who was part of the 1983 NCAA-champion Syracuse lacrosse team and who coached at Harvard, first heard about the alternative 7-12 school from a brochure in the mail.

The former coach, whose son was in fifth grade at the time, did some research online and decided to attend a seminar, where principal Eileen Mullady outlined the school’s mission and curriculum.

“I said to myself, ‘Wow, this woman hit the nail on the head of what education is all about,” Lawlor said. “I was amazed with what she had to say about the school.”

After the seminar, Lawlor approached Mullady, asking her about plans for the athletic department.

“I said, ‘By the way, what are you doing for athletics?” Lawlor said.

Several months later, Lawlor left his job at Callaway Golf to become the architect of the Firebird athletic department.

Because of Lawlor’s background in lacrosse, a sport which is gaining popularity in California, it was one of the first teams added to the program, along with soccer, volleyball, cross country and tennis.

The Connecticut native hopes to add basketball and baseball in the next few years.

“Eventually we’ll have a full gamut of CIF sports,” Lawlor said.

Pacific Ridge will go into its second year of existence with more than 200 students — doubling its enrollment from last year when the school enrolled only seventh- and ninth-graders.

By 2010, Lawlor expects the school’s enrollment to be around 550 students. He said athletics are central to the institution’s growth.

“Some kids wouldn’t consider coming to a school without an athletic program,” Lawlor said. “I think it’s a viable piece. Colleges aren’t just looking for kids who spend all of their time in the classroom.”

The Firebirds’ young program has already experienced some success. Freshman cross country runner David Hines won the Frontier League championship in his first year of competition.

All Pacific Ridge’s high school teams compete in the Frontier League, which consists of six Division V schools, while the middle schooler athletes compete against private schools from all over San Diego County.

Unlike conventional schools, Pacific Ridge students have a say in what sports the athletic department will adopt.

“We do a survey to get a pulse of what (the students) want to do,” Lawlor said. “We want to get an idea of what the interest level is.”

Much of the school’s methodology differs greatly from that of traditional schools.

First of all, you won’t find a traditional student desk at Pacific Ridge. Classes, which consist of no more than 15 students, are conducted at large oval-shaped tables.

This kind of set-up, Lawlor said, promotes participation from everyone in the classroom.

Pacific Ridge also teaches environmental awareness, which is glaringly absent from most school curriculums.

Perhaps most impressively, the entire student body was taught Mandarin Chinese in 2007. The school year was capped off with a trip to China, which Lawlor attended.

“I wish I had an opportunity to go to a school like this,” he said.

The next generation will have that opportunity, as Lawlor’s son will start the seventh grade at Pacific Ridge in 2009.

Reach reporter Matt Crosson at (760) 752-6744