Tag Archives: NCAA

Denver Men’s Lacrosse Releases 2015 Online Media Guide; Pioneers Have Reached NCAA Championship Weekend 3 Of The Past 4 Seasons


Denver Men's Lacrosse 2015 Media Guide Cover

CLICK ON LACROSSE TO READ ONLINE MEDIA GUIDE

 

Denver Men Top MLL Denver Outlaws 15-7 In 6th Annual Colorado Lacrosse Showcase On Oct 18


The University of Denver men's lacrosse team closed the game on a 9-0 run to defeat the 2014 Major League Lacrosse Champion Denver Outlaws 15-7 in the Sixth Annual Colorado Lacrosse Showcase on Saturday afternoon in-front of 1,278 at Peter Barton Lacrosse Stadium.   "Our lacrosse community here has really grown," head coach Bill Tierney said. "Thankfully with the Outlaws winning that MLL Championship and with the success that we've had here, it's become a lacrosse town. It was a great crowd, a great showing and a great afternoon. We're really excited about what goes on in the world of lacrosse out here." Sophomore transfer Connor Cannizzaro (Cazenovia, N.Y.) had a hat trick to go along with two assists to lead Denver in scoring on Saturday afternoon. Classmate Tyler Pace (Mission, B.C.) added two goals and two assists in Denver's final fall contest. Senior Erik Adamson (Anaheim Hills, Calif.) and junior Jack Bobzien (Littleton, Colo.) chipped in two goals and an assist apiece, and sophomore Dallas Bridle (Orangeville, Ontario) rounded out Denver's multi-goal scorers on the day with a pair of his own. The Pioneers won 10-of-14 faceoffs in the second half to finish 17-of-26 in the category, led by 10 wins in 13 attempts from freshman Trevor Baptiste (Newark, N.J.). Baptiste finished the afternoon with a goal and an assist in addition to his performance from the X.  Senior goalie Ryan LaPlante (Fort Collins, Colo.) played 53 of the 60 minutes, recording nine saves in the victory. Pace, Bobzien, Cannizzaro and freshman Sean Mayle (San Carlos, Calif.) all had a game-high five ground balls.  "We wanted our guys, just like last week when we played a few club teams, to focus on doing what we do and staying on the same page," Tierney said. "We lost it (the focus) a few times, but overall, I was really happy with our defense and our goalie play. I think our guys will take a lot of confidence from this game as we move into the winter."  Denver took a 6-4 lead into the intermission, before the Outlaws took their only lead of the day at 7-6 off a 3-0 run in the first 8:47 of the third quarter. Bridle started the game-ending 9-0 run with his second of the afternoon. While holding the Outlaws scoreless in the final 21:13, eight different Pioneers found the back of the net.  The Pioneers are off until January 24 when they travel to Johns Hopkins for an exhibition.

The University of Denver men’s lacrosse team closed the game on a 9-0 run to defeat the 2014 Major League Lacrosse Champion Denver Outlaws 15-7 in the Sixth Annual Colorado Lacrosse Showcase on Saturday afternoon in-front of 1,278 at Peter Barton Lacrosse Stadium.
“Our lacrosse community here has really grown,” head coach Bill Tierney said. “Thankfully with the Outlaws winning that MLL Championship and with the success that we’ve had here, it’s become a lacrosse town. It was a great crowd, a great showing and a great afternoon. We’re really excited about what goes on in the world of lacrosse out here.”
Sophomore transfer Connor Cannizzaro (Cazenovia, N.Y.) had a hat trick to go along with two assists to lead Denver in scoring on Saturday afternoon. Classmate Tyler Pace (Mission, B.C.) added two goals and two assists in Denver’s final fall contest. Senior Erik Adamson (Anaheim Hills, Calif.) and junior Jack Bobzien (Littleton, Colo.) chipped in two goals and an assist apiece, and sophomore Dallas Bridle (Orangeville, Ontario) rounded out Denver’s multi-goal scorers on the day with a pair of his own.
The Pioneers won 10-of-14 faceoffs in the second half to finish 17-of-26 in the category, led by 10 wins in 13 attempts from freshman Trevor Baptiste (Newark, N.J.). Baptiste finished the afternoon with a goal and an assist in addition to his performance from the X.
Senior goalie Ryan LaPlante (Fort Collins, Colo.) played 53 of the 60 minutes, recording nine saves in the victory. Pace, Bobzien, Cannizzaro and freshman Sean Mayle (San Carlos, Calif.) all had a game-high five ground balls.
“We wanted our guys, just like last week when we played a few club teams, to focus on doing what we do and staying on the same page,” Tierney said. “We lost it (the focus) a few times, but overall, I was really happy with our defense and our goalie play. I think our guys will take a lot of confidence from this game as we move into the winter.”
Denver took a 6-4 lead into the intermission, before the Outlaws took their only lead of the day at 7-6 off a 3-0 run in the first 8:47 of the third quarter. Bridle started the game-ending 9-0 run with his second of the afternoon. While holding the Outlaws scoreless in the final 21:13, eight different Pioneers found the back of the net.
The Pioneers are off until January 24 when they travel to Johns Hopkins for an exhibition.

NCAA Releases “2013-14 Women’s Lacrosse Sponsorship, Participation, Scholarship, Tournament, Graduation Rate And Budget Report”


NCAA Women's Lacrosse Sponsorship Statistics

NCAA Women's Lacrosse Sponsorship 2NCAA Women's Lacrosse Sponsorship 3NCAA Women's Lacrosse Sponsorship 4

 CLICK HERE TO VIEW FULL REPORT

 

Cal Berkeley Women’s Lacrosse Names Brooke Eubanks As Head Coach; Long-Time Stanford Assistant Coach & Canadian National Team Player


Brooke Eubanks, a long-time assistant coach at Stanford who won multiple medals as a player for the Canadian Senior National Team, has been named head coach for women’s lacrosse at the University of California, Berkeley. “Lacrosse is my passion,” Eubanks said. “It's the game I love to play and the game I love to coach. Being fortunate enough to play lacrosse in college and in three World Cups was too short-lived. I knew early on that I wanted to be a head coach and continue enjoying this great sport. I can't imagine a better place, a better university or a better time to be a head coach than right now at Cal. I am thrilled for this opportunity, and I promise not to disappoint.”

Brooke Eubanks, a long-time assistant coach at Stanford who won multiple medals as a player for the Canadian Senior National Team, has been named head coach for women’s lacrosse at the University of California, Berkeley.
“Lacrosse is my passion,” Eubanks said. “It’s the game I love to play and the game I love to coach. Being fortunate enough to play lacrosse in college and in three World Cups was too short-lived. I knew early on that I wanted to be a head coach and continue enjoying this great sport. I can’t imagine a better place, a better university or a better time to be a head coach than right now at Cal. I am thrilled for this opportunity, and I promise not to disappoint.”

During her time at Stanford, Eubanks served as the team’s offensive coordinator and recruiting coordinator with responsibilities such as in-game play calling, scouting opponents and coordinating practices. With her help, the Cardinal won four Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF) championships, garnered multiple national top-10 rankings, set a school record for the most wins in a season in program history (16, 2011) and produced four MPSF Players of the Year and one MPSF Rookie of the Year. In addition, Stanford earned IWLCA Division I Merit Squad recognition in 2011.

“Brooke has demonstrated a commitment to high achievement on the field and in the classroom for more than a decade as both a player and a coach at the collegiate level, and I believe that she will be a wonderful fit for our lacrosse program, our department and our university,” said Interim Director of Athletics Mike Williams. “Brooke brings a passion for lacrosse as well as a desire to create a strong team culture and positive atmosphere that should clearly benefit our student-athletes. I am excited to welcome her to Cal.”

Prior to her tenure at Stanford, Eubanks was an assistant coach at George Mason from 2006-08. During that span, George Mason collected the school record for wins in a season (12, 2008) and garnered the team’s highest national ranking in school history at No. 9. Eubanks served under current Stanford head coach Amy Bokker at both Stanford and George Mason.

“We’re very happy for Brooke in taking the next step in her coaching career,” Bokker said. “Brooke has been a dedicated part of Stanford Lacrosse. I certainly appreciate all she has done to help build the program. Now, she is prepared and ready to lead her own. Cal is getting a quality coach and person and we wish her the best.”

As a player, Eubanks was a member of the Canadian Senior National Team from 2003-13, playing in three World Cups. Canada won the silver medal in 2013, with Eubanks serving as team captain. She was second on her team in scoring in the 2009 World Cup, helping the Canadians capture the bronze medal.

Eubanks enjoyed a successful collegiate career at James Madison from 2002-06 where she was a four-year starter and led the squad to three Colonial Athletic Association championships. The Patriots advanced to the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament in 2004 and ’06. Individually, Eubanks was an all-conference second-team selection and a member of the CAA all-tournament team in both 2005 and ’06. She was also named to the 2006 Virginia Sports Information Directors’ Association All-State Team.

Raised in Englewood, Colo., Eubanks is the daughter of 1980 Pittsburgh Penguin NHL draft pick Steve McKenzie and was born in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada, while her father was playing minor-league hockey there.

Brooke and her husband, Eric, have a daughter, Olive.

Maryland Women’s Lacrosse Middie Taylor Cummings Receives 2014 Tewaaraton Award


After guiding the Terps to a 12th national championship last weekend, Maryland sophomore midfielder Taylor Cummings captured the 2014 Tewaaraton Award on a historical night Thursday at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Cummings became Maryland’s fifth overall winner and its fourth in the last five seasons after compiling a tremendous sophomore campaign for the Terps. The Ellicott City, Md., product led Maryland with 63 goals, 128 draw controls, 37 ground balls and 30 caused turnovers and ranked second on the Terps fourth-ranked scoring offense with 24 assists and 87 points. Cummings, who is also a U.S. Women’s National Team member, is a two-time IWLCA First Team All-American and earned All-ACC honors for a second time. She was tabbed to the ACC All-Tournament Team as Maryland captured its sixth consecutive conference title. Cummings was named NCAA Championship Most Valuable Player after a pair of superior performances in Maryland victories against Northwestern and Syracuse in the Final Four. Cummings joins Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012-2013) as Terrapins to win the nation’s top collegiate individual honor. She is the first female sophomore to ever win the Tewaaraton. Syracuse’s Mike Powell was the only other sophomore winner, taking the first of his two Tewaaraton awards in 1992. Native American brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson, the University of Albany stars who each broke the Division I lacrosse record for most points in a season, were co-winners of the Tewaaraton Award on the men’s side. They became the first Native Americans to win the coveted Tewaaraton trophy, which derives from the Mohawk name for the game and the progenitor of present day lacrosse.

After guiding the Terps to a 12th national championship last weekend, Maryland sophomore midfielder Taylor Cummings captured the 2014 Tewaaraton Award on a historical night Thursday at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.
Cummings became Maryland’s fifth overall winner and its fourth in the last five seasons after compiling a tremendous sophomore campaign for the Terps. The Ellicott City, Md., product led Maryland with 63 goals, 128 draw controls, 37 ground balls and 30 caused turnovers and ranked second on the Terps fourth-ranked scoring offense with 24 assists and 87 points.
Cummings, who is also a U.S. Women’s National Team member, is a two-time IWLCA First Team All-American and earned All-ACC honors for a second time. She was tabbed to the ACC All-Tournament Team as Maryland captured its sixth consecutive conference title. Cummings was named NCAA Championship Most Valuable Player after a pair of superior performances in Maryland victories against Northwestern and Syracuse in the Final Four.
Cummings joins Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012-2013) as Terrapins to win the nation’s top collegiate individual honor. She is the first female sophomore to ever win the Tewaaraton. Syracuse’s Mike Powell was the only other sophomore winner, taking the first of his two Tewaaraton awards in 1992.
Native American brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson, the University of Albany stars who each broke the Division I lacrosse record for most points in a season, were co-winners of the Tewaaraton Award on the men’s side. They became the first Native Americans to win the coveted Tewaaraton trophy, which derives from the Mohawk name for the game and the progenitor of present day lacrosse.

Albany Men’s Lacrosse Attackers Lyle & Miles Thompson Honored As Co-Winners Of 2014 Tewaaraton Award On May 29 In Washington DC


After dazzling the lacrosse world with amazing talent and ability, Miles Thompson and Lyle Thompson, brothers, teammates and Native Americans, were honored as co-winners of the 2014 Tewaaraton Trophy. This honor was bestowed at the Tewaaraton Ceremony at the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.  Honored guests included the many of the Thompson family, the UAlbany coaching staff, plus numerous lacrosse supporters and players and coaches from around the country. This is a historic day for the world of lacrosse, with the Thompsons, members of the Onondaga Nation, becoming the first Native Americans to be honored with the Tewaaraton Trophy. “It is the best feeling to share the award with my brother and be the first Native Americans to win it,” said Miles Thompson. “No words can express this feeling.” “Words cannot describe how happy I am, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Lyle Thompson. “To share the award with my brother is an honor.” Since its inception in 2001, the Tewaaraton Trophy, on the men’s or women’s side, has never been awarded to a pair of players.  The Thompson brothers become the first pair to achieve such a feat.  Each gave a speech to the crowd, bringing both, as well as many in the audience, to tears. “We grew up together, we stuck together throughout high school, and it shows how close we are,” said Miles Thompson. “For us it is about bringing a positive influence and helping people, not just Native Americans, but everyone,” said Lyle Thompson. “It is just humbling, it is an amazing honor to our university and program, honoring the players and coaches,” said UAlbany head coach Scott Marr. “It is great to have the first Native Americans winning the honor.  I cannot imagine how special it is for these two to win it together, for all of their family and teammates.” This is the first Tewaaraton Trophy to players from the America East since 2001, when Hofstra’s Doug Shanahan was selected as the award’s first recipient. Lyle Thompson, the USILA DI Outstanding Player of the Year, Outstanding Attackman and America East Player of the Year, finished with the top single season in Division I history, earning a DI-high 77 assists plus 51 goals to total 128 points, leading all of DI with 7.11 points per game.  He earned at least four points in all 18 of UAlbany’s games, including at least seven points in 11 games, including three goals and five assists in the win over Loyola against Joe Fletcher, a fellow Tewaaraton finalist. Miles Thompson, a USILA First Team All-American, America East Tournament MVP and All-America East First Team attackman, earned a DI-single season record 82 goals to lead DI with 4.56 per game, adding 37 assists for 119 points, the second-best all-time single season tally only to Lyle Thompson.  He earned at least four points in 17 of UAlbany’s 18 games, including six games with at least six goals.  He earned seven goals and two assists apiece in each America East Tournament victory.

After dazzling the lacrosse world with amazing talent and ability, Miles Thompson and Lyle Thompson, brothers, teammates and Native Americans, were honored as co-winners of the 2014 Tewaaraton Trophy.
This honor was bestowed at the Tewaaraton Ceremony at the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Honored guests included the many of the Thompson family, the UAlbany coaching staff, plus numerous lacrosse supporters and players and coaches from around the country.
This is a historic day for the world of lacrosse, with the Thompsons, members of the Onondaga Nation, becoming the first Native Americans to be honored with the Tewaaraton Trophy.
“It is the best feeling to share the award with my brother and be the first Native Americans to win it,” said Miles Thompson. “No words can express this feeling.”
“Words cannot describe how happy I am, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Lyle Thompson. “To share the award with my brother is an honor.”
Since its inception in 2001, the Tewaaraton Trophy, on the men’s or women’s side, has never been awarded to a pair of players. The Thompson brothers become the first pair to achieve such a feat. Each gave a speech to the crowd, bringing both, as well as many in the audience, to tears.
“We grew up together, we stuck together throughout high school, and it shows how close we are,” said Miles Thompson.
“For us it is about bringing a positive influence and helping people, not just Native Americans, but everyone,” said Lyle Thompson.
“It is just humbling, it is an amazing honor to our university and program, honoring the players and coaches,” said UAlbany head coach Scott Marr. “It is great to have the first Native Americans winning the honor. I cannot imagine how special it is for these two to win it together, for all of their family and teammates.”
This is the first Tewaaraton Trophy to players from the America East since 2001, when Hofstra’s Doug Shanahan was selected as the award’s first recipient.
Lyle Thompson, the USILA DI Outstanding Player of the Year, Outstanding Attackman and America East Player of the Year, finished with the top single season in Division I history, earning a DI-high 77 assists plus 51 goals to total 128 points, leading all of DI with 7.11 points per game. He earned at least four points in all 18 of UAlbany’s games, including at least seven points in 11 games, including three goals and five assists in the win over Loyola against Joe Fletcher, a fellow Tewaaraton finalist.
Miles Thompson, a USILA First Team All-American, America East Tournament MVP and All-America East First Team attackman, earned a DI-single season record 82 goals to lead DI with 4.56 per game, adding 37 assists for 119 points, the second-best all-time single season tally only to Lyle Thompson. He earned at least four points in 17 of UAlbany’s 18 games, including six games with at least six goals. He earned seven goals and two assists apiece in each America East Tournament victory.

Duke Men’s Lacrosse Wins Third NCAA Title In Five Years With 11-9 Win Over Notre Dame On May 26


Duke won its second consecutive NCAA men's lacrosse championship, holding off Notre Dame's comeback with a goal by Kyle Keenan with 2:39 left to clinch an 11-9 victory Monday. The top-seeded Blue Devils (17-3) limited the Irish to one goal over the first 35 minutes, built a six-goal lead in the third quarter and held on to capture their third national championship in the last five years. It sure wasn't easy. The sixth-seeded Irish (12-6) closed to 9-8 with 5 minutes left and had the ball with a chance to tie. But after Duke goalie Luke Aaron stopped a shot by Jim Marlatt, Keenan scored on the other end for a two-goal cushion.

Duke won its second consecutive NCAA men’s lacrosse championship, holding off Notre Dame’s comeback with a goal by Kyle Keenan with 2:39 left to clinch an 11-9 victory Monday.
The top-seeded Blue Devils (17-3) limited the Irish to one goal over the first 35 minutes, built a six-goal lead in the third quarter and held on to capture their third national championship in the last five years.
It sure wasn’t easy. The sixth-seeded Irish (12-6) closed to 9-8 with 5 minutes left and had the ball with a chance to tie. But after Duke goalie Luke Aaron stopped a shot by Jim Marlatt, Keenan scored on the other end for a two-goal cushion.

Sergio Perkovic’s fifth goal of the game made it 10-9 with 49.6 seconds remaining. Duke won the ensuing draw, however, and Jordan Wolf scored with 23.6 seconds to go to clinch it.

 

Wolf finished with two goals and four assists, and the Blue Devils got goals from seven different players.

Duke earned its first title in 2010 with a one-goal win over Notre Dame. This one, an all-Atlantic Coast Conference matchup, looked to be a lopsided rout before the Irish rallied.

Notre Dame tied a record for fewest first-half goals in the championship game last set by Cornell in 1988. The Irish, who came in averaging 12 goals and 37 shots per game, took only 18 shots.

Duke’s swarming defense had a lot to do with that.

Notre Dame has played in 19 NCAA tournaments and reached the national semifinals on four occasions but still has not won the championship.

Duke, on the other hand, has the makings of a dynasty. The Blue Devils have played in each of the last eight national semifinals and reached the title game four times in that span under coach John Danowski.

Up 5-1 at halftime, Duke got a goal from Keenan with 17 seconds gone in the third quarter. After Perkovic answered for the Irish, the Blue Devils scored twice within a minute for an 8-2 lead.