Tag Archives: Photos

Lacrosse Photos: Domincan University Of California Men’s Lacrosse Photoshoot In San Francisco Bay By Zach Heffner Of Verdict Photography


Marketing Lacrosse: Pepsico USA’s “Mountain Dew Lacrosse” From Tracey Locke Agency (Wilton, CT)


Client: Pepsico,USA...Brand: Mountain Dew...Agency: Tracey Locke, Wilton, CT...Build awareness of the Mountain Dew brand by associating it with the tough, energetic, fast paced sport of Lacrosse. The overall look needed to be visually impactful and relevant to the target consumer age group (males 18yrs+ with key interests in sports, gaming, and anime).

http://www.behance.net/gallery/MOUNTAIN-DEW-LACROSSE/2228418

 

Lacrosse Photos: Verdict Photography Features “Anatomy Of A Lacrosse Shot” With Casey Powell


This Verdict image comes from a a video shoot featuring Casey Powell,…and some baby powder.

NCAA Lacrosse: Photos Of Duke Men’s Lacrosse Renovated Locker Room


“SAVE CAL LACROSSE” Photos From Zach Heffner Of Verdict Photography “Capture The Betrayal” Of Cal Berkeley’s Decision To Cut Women’s Lacrosse Program And “End Student-Athlete’s Dreams”


 
 
 

“The following are Verdict photos that are accompanying a tragic story in the  Feb issue of US Lacrosse Magazine. I was asked to photograph the Cal Berkeley Women’s Lacrosse team who had just found out that funding has been cut for their team and they were entering their last year as a varsity squad. I felt so bad for these girls who have sacrificed so much (as all collegiate athletes do) just to have the rug pulled out from under them and also to have ZERO say in the matter. They were understandably upset and stunned by the school’s announcement. I tried to capture the betrayal and the let down of the situation but also the strength in these girls to handle and move forward through this. I hope these photos and the story shine a light on the situation and NOTHING like this happens again…”

 

“You can’t put a price on dreams!”  Zach Heffner

See more verdict Photography work at: www.verdictphotography.com & be sure to check out the Verdict Blog

Lacrosse Photography: Brett Queener In Easton Lacrosse Photo Shoot From Verdict Photography


Lacrosse Photography: Verdict Photography “Team USA Lacrosse Promo Shoot” Features Pro Lacrosse Player Eric Martin


http://verdictphotography.blogspot.com/

Lacrosse Photography: Former Virginia Men’s Lacrosse Defenseman Zach Heffner Founded Verdict Photography In 2008 With An “Edgy And Artistic” Style That Is Winning A National Reputation


2010 Hawaii Lacrosse Invitational: Wimmer Solutions Lacrosse Defeated Crease Monkeys 14-5 In Open Championship Final Behind “Insane” Goaltending By Brett Queener


College Men’s And Women’s Lacrosse “Bodies”: “ESPN The Magazine” Features Penn State Lacrosse “Student Body” Photographs In 3-D


The purpose of ESPN The Magazine’s “Student Body” is to deviate from the sports norm and display an athlete in all his or her glory in a completely stationary pose, as described on ESPN’s website. In the feature, one can compare Lauren Purvis, a 5-foot-7 field hockey freshman, to Jack Crawford, a 6-foot-5 junior defensive end, side-by-side. It aptly shows how an athlete’s frame varies from sport to sport.

In the spring months in Happy Valley, junior lacrosse captain Matt Mackrides is called upon to score goals. Four weeks ago, he was called upon to do something more outside of his comfort zone: model.

A photography crew from ESPN came to Penn State in September to take pictures for a Student Body feature in ESPN The Magazine’s annual Body Issue.

But these were no ordinary pictures.

One athlete from each of Penn State’s 29 varsity sports was photographed in 3-D, and the process was anything but ordinary.

The purpose of ESPN The Magazine’s “Student Body” is to deviate from the sports norm and display an athlete in all his or her glory in a completely stationary pose, as described on ESPN’s website. In the feature, one can compare Lauren Purvis, a 5-foot-7 field hockey freshman, to Jack Crawford, a 6-foot-5 junior defensive end, side-by-side. It aptly shows how an athlete’s frame varies from sport to sport.

“They had two stands up, and they kind of looked like projectors,” Mackrides said. “I just stood in between them and rotated my body whenever they told me to.

For Mackrides, the process took about 30 minutes, much longer than the typical split-second photograph. However, ESPN told him at the end of the shoot that he actually took the shortest amount of time.

“They said it took longer for other people because sometimes the technology didn’t go through or the picture wasn’t right,” he said.

For more:   http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2010/10/08/espn_mag.aspx