Tag Archives: St. Margaret’s

St. Margaret’s Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles Talks About The Critical Role That Booster Clubs, Athletic Directors And Parents Have In Hiring And Retaining High School Lacrosse Coaches


st margaret's lacrosse

St. Margaret's Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

In part five of his interview with LaxBuzz, Glen Miles, head coach of the Nike/US Lacrosse West Region #4 Ranked St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse program, discusses the important issues High School Athletic Directors and Booster Clubs must consider in hiring a Varsity Lacrosse Coach and staff in order to create a successful lacrosse program.

LaxBuzz:    What should high school Athletic Directors and Booster Clubs look for in hiring a new Varsity Lacrosse coach and their top assistants to create a culture and foundation leading to a successful program?    How do you define success at the high school level?

Glen Miles: “High School coaching in California is a very challenging proposition.  To run a successful High School program takes a lot of time, effort and resources.  These young coaches are attracted and convinced to take a coaching position because the “booster” club has promised how motivated they are to help the young coach navigate the process, and for the most part this is very true.”
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“Lacrosse parents and boosters are working very hard to help their kid’s lacrosse programs exist at the High School level. Unfortunately, I have heard too many stories from young coaches that have difficulty handling the parents who are not happy with them for one reason or another.”

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 “I feel like we beg these young coaches to come and coach our boys and then, the moment the young coach makes a mistake or has a challenge, the “parents” exert unrealistic expectations  on a very young man and simply just make it too hard and not fun for him.  At this rate and with this trend, we could have a problem.”

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“The alternative for these young guys is Club lacrosse.  Much like soccer, club lacrosse is growing and High School lacrosse is stagnating.  This is terribly unfortunate.  We need to reverse this trend immediately if we want to preserve lacrosse as a High School sport.  The parental problems is not as big an issue for club coaches.  As a club coach, parents can just leave and go play somewhere else.  High School does not work this way.”
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“My sense is that we can get these young coaches out here early but then the moment things get tough, they are out.  We are forgetting that they are young and that they need training and more importantly they need our grace and our patience.”
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“I think parents are leading the charge for lacrosse more than the athletic directors and that is why this is an issue.  Athletic directors are very capable of handling and training young coaches—they just need to want to.  This is an additional sport for an athletic director who was already overworked.”

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“For this reason, it seems the athletic directors are letting the parents help the High School coach navigate the process.  Unfortunately when it does not go the parent’s way they have great influence to make a change.”
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“We need to commit to these young coaches and teach them how to lead and how to communicate with all members—players, parents, and teachers.  Many young coaches are merely coaching the way they were coached and sometimes that is good and sometimes that is bad.  If its bad, it needs to be changed.”

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“Joe Ehrmann, founder of “Coach For America” and author of “Inside Out Coaching”, has a very unique coaching perspective that the athletic director at St. Margaret’s has embraced, and one that we at Victory are working hard to incorporate into everything we do.  Joe’s training is a great place for school administrators, parents and coaches to start in order to help create a culture of success.”
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“In the Coach For America model, success is measured 20 years after the players graduate.  Is he a man of integrity? Is he a good brother, husband and father?  If he is, then we succeeded.  As I mentioned earlier, winning is a by product of that success.”

St. Margaret’s Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles Discusses “Playing Time” And The Important Role Of Seniors On A High School Lacrosse Team


st margaret's lacrosse

St. Margaret's Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

In part four of his interview with LaxBuzz, Glen Miles, head coach of the Nike/US Lacrosse West Region #4 Ranked St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse program, discusses the role of seniors on a high school lacrosse team.

LaxBuzz: Many parents have contacted me over the years regarding playing time for upper classmen, especially seniors. There is a fine line between playing “the best” players, giving playing time to freshman and sophomores, and honoring seniors who have, in many cases, along with their families, put in eight years of sacrifice to get to this moment. This will be the last year of lacrosse for many of them. What is your philosophy regarding playing seniors? Is there an “honor code” in lacrosse that you honor seniors on high school lacrosse teams?

Glen Miles: “This is a very difficult issue and obviously very painful for the seniors who don’t get to play as much as they had hoped they would.  I believe coaches need to work authentically and empathetically love their players.  If kids feel loved and are able to put the goals of the team before themselves, this challenge can be managed.  This takes a very different level of commitment to each individual than many coaches are willing to give. “
 
“That said, I also believe high school sports are played and coaches should coach and make decisions based on what he or she believes will give the team the best opportunity to win.”
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“For me this means playing the players who have earned the right to play through hard work, love for their teammates, a commitment to the team and a passion to prepare on and off the field.”

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“For me playing time is not earned through longevity.  My seniors certainly get the benefit of the doubt if their performance is equal or close to an underclassman but not merely because they have been there the longest.”

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“I believe that if coaches truly “love” their guys that they will feel the pain a senior maybe feeling from a lack of playing and should empathetically help the player work through that challenge.”
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“There are many roles to play on a Varsity Lacrosse Team.  There are leadership roles, there are follower roles, there are scout team roles, and there are friendship roles.  If a coach is an effective leader, he can help each senior find a role that is rewarding to him.”

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 “Obviously this is a difficult thing to handle as a young man but I feel strongly that the community of “team” is the training ground for life.  Handled appropriately, every senior can feel great and grateful about being on the team whether that involves playing time or not.”
 
 

High School Lacrosse: Western U.S. #4 St. Margaret’s Boys Lacrosse Scored Four Goals In 27 Seconds In Trinity League Championship Game


St. Margaret’s Episcopal defeats JSerra Catholic for the Trinity League Championship, sealing the deal by scoring four goals in 27 seconds.

st margaret's lacrosse

St. Margaret’s Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles Talks About The Limitations Of Lacrosse Specialization, And The Importance Of Multiple Sports’ Skill Sets, Great Coaching And Mentors


st margaret's lacrosse

St. Margaret's Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

In part three of his interview with LaxBuzz, Glen Miles, head coach of the Nike/US Lacrosse West Region #4 Ranked St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse program, discusses how important it is for high school lacrosse players to attempt to play multiple sports and benefit from developing multiple skill sets and experience quality coaching.

LaxBuzz: Should high school lacrosse players play on multiple club teams, amounting to essentially a year-round dedication to lacrosse? Should these players be encouraged to play other sports and/or taking periodic breaks from playing lacrosse?

Glen Miles:   “Great question.  It is critical for our young players who want to compete at a very high level to be well coached.  The parity and shear numbers of players at all levels of lacrosse have made it extremely important for our kids to “know how to play.”  Every roster spot is important to a college lacrosse program and they are not going to just give roster spots away.  Everyone on the roster has a role to play.”
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“That’s a loaded statement.  “Know how to play”—there is so much to this including athletically, offensively and defensively.  With sports specialization, kids are not being exposed to many very basic athletic concepts of space, advantage/disadvantage and risk/reward.”
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  “I am a huge advocate for kids to play multiple sports and expose themselves to a variety of skill sets that other sports beside lacrosse offer.  Additionally, there are a lot of great coaches in our area that don’t teach lacrosse.  We need to expose our kids to those coaches too.”

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“If character and leadership training are as important as I think they and there is a great mentor out there coaching a different sport why not play that game and learn from the great ones.  Let’s not lock ourselves into one sport especially at the youth level because we can learn critical team skills from a variety of people.”
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“From my recent coaching experience over the past 5 years, many High School coaches are starting to understand this dynamic, especially the football guys.  I have had a blessed life, but as lacrosse guy, a High School quarterback and a basketball point guard, I loved my High School sports experience more than many of the other experiences in my life.”
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“Specialization is taking that away, and I think it is a terrible shame.  The reality of a college scholarship is rare and to sacrifice all of the benefits of multiple sports for that goal is foolish to me.”

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“Obviously, my assumption is that the kids like the other sports too.  Don’t just play another sport to play it, but if you love 2-3 sports then play them and have fun.  Here is where the coaching comes in.  If we as coaches are not making it fun to be coached by us, then the kids will choose fun.”
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“One of my mentor’s asks: “What does it feel like to be coached by me?” 

“That simple question has changed me dramatically as a person and as a coach.  What does it feel like to my daughter? What does it feel like to be my wife?  Scary huh?  That’s how we are trying to approach every aspect of our daily interactions with the kids.”

St. Margaret’s Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles Discusses The Importance Of Recruiting And Supporting Experienced Coaches To Maintain The Growth Of Western High School Lacrosse Programs


st margaret's lacrosse

St. Margaret's Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

In the second part of an interview, Glen Miles, head coach of 2013 CIF-Southern Section Lacrosse Champion St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse program, talks about the importance of “experienced and dedicated” coaching in Western High School Lacrosse.

LaxBuzz: University of Denver Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Bill Tierney has stated that it is critical for the continued growth and success of Western Lacrosse to have “high quality, experienced and dedicated coaches” (i.e. East Coast experience) to continue to take up positions with club teams and high school programs. Many top Division I players have been traveling back and landing at Western programs, but they lack the experience in coaching at top collegiate programs.

How do you see experienced “East Coast coaches” being lured to coming out west? Is it possible for top boys coaches to play MCLA or Div II or III college lacrosse at western programs and become top-level coaches?

Glen Miles: “Coach Tierney is 100% correct.  He has great interest in the California Lacrosse market.  Many of our highly skilled players will be attracted to Denver University for a variety of reasons.”

“First, he is a great coach, leader and mentor and he runs a great program.  Second, it is the closest DI program and if our players want to shoot for the highest level, it is a great place to go to school.”

“High quality coaching is very important.  Because we live in California and have arguably the most desirable climate on the planet, attracting great young lacrosse guys to California will not be too difficult.”

What will be difficult is keeping these coaches coaching High School Lacrosse.  It will not be difficult to keep them in California, but regrettably they seem to migrate toward club lacrosse and away from High School programs.”

“The reason for this is simple: the average High School coaching stipend is around $3000.  The job as it is structured right now is difficult for the little bit of money that they receive.  They are doing it for the love of the game and the love of the kids.  We can’t add additional stress to the job description.”

Booster clubs, steering committees and the like must be patient and be willing to accept some mistake as a young coach grows.  The guys that want to do this job understand that they must have a “real job” to make ends meet.  Sometimes their real job is lacrosse and sometimes it is not.”

“I think there are plenty of great coaching role models currently at MCLA, DII and DIII.  The issue of whether a young coach continues to grow is a factor of how committed we are to help him grow.”

Top Western U.S. High School Lacrosse Coaches: 2013 CIF-Southern Section Champion St. Margaret’s Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles Interview


st margaret's lacrosse

St. Margaret's Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Head Coach Glen Miles. OCVarsity.com

St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse first-year head coach Glen Miles led the third-seeded Tartans to a championship game victory over top-ranked Coronal del Mar in the CIF-Southern Section South Division playoffs and then captured the 2013 Southern Section Lacrosse Title against Harvard-Westlake of North Hollywood on May 11. They finished the year #4 in the Nike/US Lacrosse West Region rankings. Coach Miles previously coached the San Clemente Boys Varsity Lacrosse team for 5 years, having established the program in 2008.

US Naval Academy Midfielder Glen Miles (1983-86). Photo courtesy of US Naval Academy.

US Naval Academy Midfielder Glen Miles (1983-86). Photo courtesy of US Naval Academy.

A native of Timonium, Md., Coach Miles was a three-sport standout at Dulaney High School, lettering in football, basketball and lacrosse. He was a midfielder and attacker for the US Naval Academy (1983-86) and is considered one of the premier players of his time.  A three-time All-American and winner of the 1986 Lt. j.g. Donald MacLaughlin Jr. Award as the nation’s top Midfielder, he helped the Midshipmen advance to the NCAA Quarter Finals in 1986.  He was inducted into the United States Naval Academy’s Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1986 and was an alternate for the U.S. World team that same year.  Four years later he was a member of the U.S. team that won the 1990 World Lacrosse Championship.

Coach Miles went on to enjoy a successful career in the United States Marine Corps where he served as an F-18 pilot.  He graduated from Naval Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun) in 1996 and served as an Air Combat Tactics Instructor throughout the rest of his military career. He is a founder of San Juan Capistrano, CA-based Victory Lacrosse, the premier lacrosse and leadership development organization in the United States.

The following is the first of a five-part interview that Coach Miles granted to LaxBuzz on the importance of “high quality, experienced and dedicated high school coaches” for the continued growth of western lacrosse.

LaxBuzz: Hello, Glen. Congratulations on your team’s success in 2013, your first at St. Margaret’s.  You are from Baltimore, MD and played lacrosse at the Naval Academy, both located on the East Coast where lacrosse has been focused and dominated for over 100 years. What brought you and kept you out west to coach Youth and High School Lacrosse since 1990?

Glen Miles:  “Thank you.  It was quite a fun year with a very special group of players and coaches.  After graduating from the Naval Academy, I went to Marine Corps Basic School and then off to flight school.  When I got my wings, I was assigned F-18s and transferred to Marine Corps Air Station El Toro.  I began coaching in Orange County in 1990 and I was fortunate to work with a a great lacrosse enthusiast and great man—Mitch Fenton.  Mitch and I coached at Trabuco Hills HS in the early 90’s.  We had a lot of fun back then and that group was a blast.”

LaxBuzz: How important is teaching character, responsibility, and honor to young lacrosse players? How does a coach accomplish this and attain success on the field?

Glen Miles:  “We believe that character, responsibility and honor are extremely important for all of the youth in America and specifically where we invest our time and energy with young lacrosse players.  At Victory we have added a few more values as well.  Dignity, Integrity and Grace.  We feel youth sports is the most effective way to teach these values.  Sometimes this is a difficult task in our sometimes “win at all costs” culture.  However that is no excuse.  As coaches, we have the power, position and platform to teach these values and many others.  Additionally, we feel very strongly about relationships and we try to teach the value of relationships in the context of a team community.  We take that job very seriously.”

“This is how we define success. Winning is merely a byproduct of that success.  We define success as how these boys turn out as men, brothers, husbands and fathers.  If we teach our players to love each other and teach them how to accept love or be loved, everything else starts to take care of itself.  Regardless of what event, tragedy, or success occurs, when you lead through the various events from an underpinning of authentic love, you can’t go wrong. And that’s when all people, young and old, want to work together for the greater good.  Not implying this is simple.  If it were simple, we wouldn’t have all the issues we have in the world, but when you keep after it and fall back to this value, more good than bad surrounds the organization.  Coaches must care deeply about the players and the players must selflessly care deeply about each other.”

2013 St. Margaret's Boys Lacrosse Team

2013 St. Margaret’s Episcopal Boys Lacrosse Team

High School Lacrosse: “Nike/US Lacrosse West Region Boys Lacrosse Top 10” Features #1 St. Ignatius Prep Followed By Torrey Pines, La Costa Canyon, Cherry Creek And St. Margaret’s Episcopal


Nike US Lacrosse West Region High School Lacrosse Top 10

The best against the best
A victory over La Costa Canyon helped propel Torrey Pines into the top seed of the CIF San Diego Section Open Division boys’ lacrosse playoffs.
The Falcons will play the No. 8 seed Rancho Bernardo next weekend. Torrey Pines coach Jon Zissi is in favor of the new playoff format.
“We play a dangerous Rancho Bernardo team on Saturday in round one,” Zissi said. “The Open Division is a good idea – pits the best against the best, so there is one true champion of San Diego.”
La Costa Canyon earned the second seed and plays No. 7 seed San Marcos (Calif.). If the rankings hold, Torrey Pines and La Costa Canyon would play for a third time this season, this time for the title. The teams split their regular season meetings and have played four consecutive one-goal games; with two going double overtime.
A surging Cathedral Catholic team earned the third seed and will play No. 6 Bishop’s School. Poway is the fourth-seeded team and will play No. 5 Coronado.

1. St. Ignatius Prep (Calif.), 21-1

The Wildcats have established themselves as one of the nation’s elite programs. St. Ignatius bounced back from a loss to Chaminade (N.Y.) with four consecutive victories, outscoring opponents 71-20. The Wildcats closed out the regular season game with a 9-8 victory over Bellarmine Prep (Calif.) for their fourth consecutive West Catholic Athletic League championship.

2. Torrey Pines (Calif.), 14-3

The Falcons avenged an earlier season loss to La Costa Canyon (Calif.) by winning the rematch 4-3. That victory was the catalyst for two more victories over Bishop’s School (Calif.) and Carlsbad (Calif.), resulting in a No. 1 seed in the section playoffs.

3. La Costa Canyon (Calif.), 16-3

After losing to rival Torrey Pines, the Mavericks bounced back with victories over Rancho Bernardo (Calif.) and Coronado (Calif.). La Costa Canyon takes on a tough San Marcos (Calif.) in the playoffs and could very well see Torrey Pines again for a rubber match later in the postseason.

4. Cherry Creek (Colo.), 12-5

The Bruins earned the top seed in the state playoffs by closing out the regular season with two victories. Cherry Creek opened its playoffs run with victories over Denver East (Colo.) in the first round and Colorado Academy (Colo.) in the quarterfinals.

5. St. Margaret’s Episcopal (Calif.), 21-4

The Tartans continued their impressive run with a 12-8 victory over Corona del Mar (Calif.) for the Orange County championship. St. Margaret’s followed that up with a 15-8 victory over Harvard-Westlake (Calif.) in the US Lacrosse CIF Southern-Section championship. The Tartans are riding an 18-game winning streak and have not lost since March 19.

6. Bellevue (Wash.), 16-2

The Wolverines have established themselves as the team to beat in the Washington State playoffs by putting together another impressive campaign. Bellevue has yet to lose a game to an in-state opponent and closes out the regular season on the road against Curtis (Wash.) and Skyline (Wash.).

7. Corona del Mar (Calif.), 18-3

The Sea Kings lost 12-7 to St. Margaret’s Episcopal (Calif.) for the Orange County championship. Nonetheless, Corona del Mar continues to be one of the top programs on the West Coast and reload for next season.

8. Cathedral Catholic (Calif.), 18-2

The Dons are riding a 15-game winning streak. Cathedral Catholic earned a No. 4 seed in the CIF San Diego Section Open Division boys’ lacrosse playoffs.

9. Regis Jesuit (Colo.), 13-5

The Raiders grabbed some momentum heading into the playoffs with three consecutive victories to close out the regular season. Regis Jesuit then knocked off Highland Ranch (Colo.) and Mullen (Colo.) in the playoffs.

10. Arapahoe (Colo.), 14-3

The Warriors rebounded from a loss to Regis Jesuit in the regular season with a victory over Mountain Vista (Colo.). Arapahoe advanced in the state playoffs and beat Mountain Vista before upsetting No. 2 seed Columbine (Colo.).

For more:  http://www.laxmagazine.com/high_school/boys/2012-13/news/051413_nike_us_lacrosse_west_region_report