Tag Archives: Teams

NCAA Lacrosse Participation: Men’s Lacrosse Supported By 24.4% Of Member Institutions While Women’s Lacrosse Is Sponsored By 32.1%, Both Increases Over Previous Year


The NCAA issues an annual report on sports sponsorship, participation, and squad size. Their most recent report, which contains detailed information by gender and division for the period from 1982 through 2010, shows that 32.1% of NCAA member institutions sponsor women's lacrosse (up from 29.8% the previous year), and 24.4% sponsor men's lacrosse (up from 23.1%).

For NCAA Men's Lacrosse, the bulk of the growth has occurred in Division III.

Since the early to mid 90s, the number of schools sponsoring NCAA Women's Lacrosse has grown sharply and has surpassed the number for men.

NCAA Women’s Lacrosse: NCAA Div II Women’s Lacrosse Championship Committee Considering Expansion To Four Divisions Including Mid-Atlantic And West As Teams Grow From 55 To 62 By 2013


In 2010, 55 teams played Division II women’s lacrosse. That number is expected to grow to 61 or 62 by the 2013 season, based on the schools that have announced they will add varsity teams.

The proposed expansion would increase the field to eight teams and include realignment of teams into four regions: Mid-Atlantic, Northeast, West and South. Two tournament teams would come from each region, said NCAA assistant director of championships Sherard Clinkscales, who will make the women’s proposal. Two regions — North and South — exist now.

The Mid-Atlantic region would include teams from the ECC and CACC, the Northeast from the NE-10, the West from the PSAC and the South from Conference Carolinas and independents.

“We are hearing of new teams popping up all over the country in all areas,” said Lock Haven coach Kristen Selvage, chair of the women’s committee and IWLCA president. “I feel very optimistic about our proposal, because we have submitted it in the best interests of all parties involved — the student-athletes that are fortunate enough to participate in an NCAA championship and the institutions that have, or hope to add, the sport of women’s lacrosse.”

“The current two-region format is extremely competitive, and each year, I see great teams left out,” Selvage added. “Sometimes it just comes down to one late-season win or one late-game goal that sends you to the show.”

For more:  http://www.laxmagazine.com/college_men/DII/2010-11/news/010411_division_ii_committees_propose_expansion_of_ncaa_lacrosse_tournaments

Men’s College Lacrosse: Will The “Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association” (MCLA) Teams Remain Primarily College Club Sport Programs?


Is there a way to make the MCLA a coach-friendly space or is it doomed to be, for the most part, a coaches killing field?

The most obvious factor – and isn’t it always? – is money.

The gap between the expectations and resources needed to field a tournament-caliber team in the Men’s Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) and the club infrastructure that the lacrosse programs typically fall under is widening at a dangerous pace.

MCLA teams with serious expectations of being selected to complete in the national tournament need a budget well into the hundreds of thousands of dollars just to stay on the radar, as well as player commitment on par with varsity programs and an organizational structure that relies on the unwavering dedication of young men between the ages of 18 and 22.

Considering the many variables involved, it’s impressive that as many quality programs across the country possessing aspirations for Denver even exist. When one understands that many MCLA teams are treated like ‘activities’ such as Frisbee, badminton, ballroom dancing or ping-pong by their institutions, it’s almost a miracle they’ve evolved to their current level.

Much of the credit for lacrosse’s evolution among the non-varsity ranks is due to the coaches who have accepted the thankless job of guiding the MCLA programs, many without a sniff of a paycheck and some with a tepid stipend. As it turns out, sadly, it’s the coaches who have become the biggest variable in the growth of the association.

Just in the last two years, the MCLA has lost some of its most experienced teachers. Some were axed as the result of conflict with the school administration; some were based on a poor relationship with the players, alumni or parents. Still others jumped to the varsity world. And then there were others who just couldn’t afford coaching at the club level.

Is there a way to make the MCLA a coach-friendly space or is it doomed to be, for the most part, a coaches killing field?

The most obvious factor – and isn’t it always? – is money.

For more:  http://www.laxmagazine.com/landing/index

Growth Of Colorado High School Lacrosse: High School Boys And Girls Lacrosse Teams To Expand To 50 Schools For Girls And 63 For Boys


In lacrosse, new teams have been added for the next two-year cycle and changes have been made to existing leagues to accommodate those teams. Girls lacrosse will expand from 41 to 50 schools (and the playoff field will grow from 17 to 20 teams), while boys lacrosse will add four schools to bring its total to 63 teams. Girls lacrosse also will adopt a national rule so that games do not end in a tie.

When the Colorado High School Activities Association’s Board of Control convenes Thursday for its first meeting this school year, it will be faced with a full agenda, to say the least.school classifications based on enrollment numbers, and also has recommended four new schools (Belleview Christian, CIVA, Collegiate Academy and Lake City) be added to the CHSAA.football always draws the most interest statewide, and there certainly has been a lot of buzz about the proposed new league alignments, but there will be other items discussed. baseball committee report establishes a pairings process based on geography for seeds Nos. 25-32 in Class 5A, 4A and 3A, while also seeding the semifinals in Class 2A. The Class 2A state tournament also would move to the same weekend as the 5A, 4A and 3A events.lacrosse, new teams have been added for the next two-year cycle and changes have been made to existing leagues to accommodate those teams. Girls lacrosse will expand from 41 to 50 schools (and the playoff field will grow from 17 to 20 teams), while boys lacrosse will add four schools to bring its total to 63 teams. Girls lacrosse also will adopt a national rule so that games do not end in a tie.soccer and softball will adjust its playoff regions/districts to accommodate reclassification, and also will establish a playoff pairings process (for teams Nos. 25-32) based on geography.

Volleyball also will undergo changes to its district and regional alignments, based on reclassification. here.

To see the complete bylaw proposals and committee reports for other sports, click

The 67-member legislative body will consider one constitutional, 14 administrative and 15 sport committee proposals, in addition to one activity and two policy recommendations. The meeting is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. at the Red Lion Hotel Southeast (Interstate 225 & Parker Road).

With the current two-year sport cycle set to expire at the end of the school year in June, the most substantive BOC business will be to establish updated classifications and new league alignments for schools for the 2010-12 competitive rotation.

The BOC’s Classification and League Organizing Committee is responsible for determining

While the sport committee reports (which include the new league alignments) figure to take up the bulk of the meeting, there are several administrative proposals that are of note.

Two of the administrative proposals will address the current transfer rule, which essentially requires a student-athlete who transfers schools without a bona fide family move to miss half the varsity contests at the student-athlete’s new school, in any sport in which he/she participated at the previous school.

Under one proposal by the CHSAA Executive Committee, the transfer rule would receive additional support language. If approved, a student-athlete would be ineligible for one year if the transfer was deemed to be “substantially motivated by athletic consideration.” Although the Executive Committee recognized the possibility that the new standard might be difficult to prove, it wanted to make such a statement, nonetheless, according to the committee report.

Determining the motivation for a transfer wouldn’t be an issue, though, if another Executive Committee recommendation is approved. In a proposal that would significantly alter the transfer rule, a student-athlete who transfers to a school where his/her club coach is employed would be limited to sub-varsity competition for a year. The proposal is designed to discourage athletically motivated transfers.

Also, the Executive Committee has proposed a bylaw that would allow some flexibility in the current Sunday Contact Rule, permitting contact between coaches and student-athletes for “voluntary social, academic or service related activities.”

In addition, one policy recommendation that could impact the postseason in nearly every sport will be considered. The CHSAA Executive Committee has proposed that all sports committees use geography “as the primary consideration” when determining formats for the playoffs, to help schools deal with current economic conditions. The rationale is the proposal will help schools save money by cutting down on travel expenses in the postseason.

Among the sport committee reports,

Most notable are several playoff changes: Class A 6-Man would play crossover games in Week 9, featuring the top four teams in each league; in A 8-Man, the winners of the Week 9 crossover games would be seeded instead of being placed in a predetermined 16-team bracket; the four wild-card qualifiers in 2A may now come from any league; in 3A the seven league champions and the top wild-card qualifier would receive a top-eight seed and a first-round home playoff game, and the 16-team state field will be seeded; the top 16 qualifiers in the 5A state bracket will be locked in, while teams Nos. 17-32 may move up or down one seed to avoid a league opponent in the first round; also in 5A, the higher-seeded team will be the home team from the quarterfinals through the state championship.

http://www.maxpreps.com/news/ULWdBQecEd-UswAcxJTdpg/colorado–chsaa-set-to-debate-full-agenda.htm