Tag Archives: Tewaaraton Award

Maryland Women’s Lacrosse Middie Taylor Cummings Receives 2014 Tewaaraton Award


After guiding the Terps to a 12th national championship last weekend, Maryland sophomore midfielder Taylor Cummings captured the 2014 Tewaaraton Award on a historical night Thursday at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Cummings became Maryland’s fifth overall winner and its fourth in the last five seasons after compiling a tremendous sophomore campaign for the Terps. The Ellicott City, Md., product led Maryland with 63 goals, 128 draw controls, 37 ground balls and 30 caused turnovers and ranked second on the Terps fourth-ranked scoring offense with 24 assists and 87 points. Cummings, who is also a U.S. Women’s National Team member, is a two-time IWLCA First Team All-American and earned All-ACC honors for a second time. She was tabbed to the ACC All-Tournament Team as Maryland captured its sixth consecutive conference title. Cummings was named NCAA Championship Most Valuable Player after a pair of superior performances in Maryland victories against Northwestern and Syracuse in the Final Four. Cummings joins Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012-2013) as Terrapins to win the nation’s top collegiate individual honor. She is the first female sophomore to ever win the Tewaaraton. Syracuse’s Mike Powell was the only other sophomore winner, taking the first of his two Tewaaraton awards in 1992. Native American brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson, the University of Albany stars who each broke the Division I lacrosse record for most points in a season, were co-winners of the Tewaaraton Award on the men’s side. They became the first Native Americans to win the coveted Tewaaraton trophy, which derives from the Mohawk name for the game and the progenitor of present day lacrosse.

After guiding the Terps to a 12th national championship last weekend, Maryland sophomore midfielder Taylor Cummings captured the 2014 Tewaaraton Award on a historical night Thursday at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.
Cummings became Maryland’s fifth overall winner and its fourth in the last five seasons after compiling a tremendous sophomore campaign for the Terps. The Ellicott City, Md., product led Maryland with 63 goals, 128 draw controls, 37 ground balls and 30 caused turnovers and ranked second on the Terps fourth-ranked scoring offense with 24 assists and 87 points.
Cummings, who is also a U.S. Women’s National Team member, is a two-time IWLCA First Team All-American and earned All-ACC honors for a second time. She was tabbed to the ACC All-Tournament Team as Maryland captured its sixth consecutive conference title. Cummings was named NCAA Championship Most Valuable Player after a pair of superior performances in Maryland victories against Northwestern and Syracuse in the Final Four.
Cummings joins Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012-2013) as Terrapins to win the nation’s top collegiate individual honor. She is the first female sophomore to ever win the Tewaaraton. Syracuse’s Mike Powell was the only other sophomore winner, taking the first of his two Tewaaraton awards in 1992.
Native American brothers Miles and Lyle Thompson, the University of Albany stars who each broke the Division I lacrosse record for most points in a season, were co-winners of the Tewaaraton Award on the men’s side. They became the first Native Americans to win the coveted Tewaaraton trophy, which derives from the Mohawk name for the game and the progenitor of present day lacrosse.

Albany Men’s Lacrosse Attackers Lyle & Miles Thompson Honored As Co-Winners Of 2014 Tewaaraton Award On May 29 In Washington DC


After dazzling the lacrosse world with amazing talent and ability, Miles Thompson and Lyle Thompson, brothers, teammates and Native Americans, were honored as co-winners of the 2014 Tewaaraton Trophy. This honor was bestowed at the Tewaaraton Ceremony at the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.  Honored guests included the many of the Thompson family, the UAlbany coaching staff, plus numerous lacrosse supporters and players and coaches from around the country. This is a historic day for the world of lacrosse, with the Thompsons, members of the Onondaga Nation, becoming the first Native Americans to be honored with the Tewaaraton Trophy. “It is the best feeling to share the award with my brother and be the first Native Americans to win it,” said Miles Thompson. “No words can express this feeling.” “Words cannot describe how happy I am, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Lyle Thompson. “To share the award with my brother is an honor.” Since its inception in 2001, the Tewaaraton Trophy, on the men’s or women’s side, has never been awarded to a pair of players.  The Thompson brothers become the first pair to achieve such a feat.  Each gave a speech to the crowd, bringing both, as well as many in the audience, to tears. “We grew up together, we stuck together throughout high school, and it shows how close we are,” said Miles Thompson. “For us it is about bringing a positive influence and helping people, not just Native Americans, but everyone,” said Lyle Thompson. “It is just humbling, it is an amazing honor to our university and program, honoring the players and coaches,” said UAlbany head coach Scott Marr. “It is great to have the first Native Americans winning the honor.  I cannot imagine how special it is for these two to win it together, for all of their family and teammates.” This is the first Tewaaraton Trophy to players from the America East since 2001, when Hofstra’s Doug Shanahan was selected as the award’s first recipient. Lyle Thompson, the USILA DI Outstanding Player of the Year, Outstanding Attackman and America East Player of the Year, finished with the top single season in Division I history, earning a DI-high 77 assists plus 51 goals to total 128 points, leading all of DI with 7.11 points per game.  He earned at least four points in all 18 of UAlbany’s games, including at least seven points in 11 games, including three goals and five assists in the win over Loyola against Joe Fletcher, a fellow Tewaaraton finalist. Miles Thompson, a USILA First Team All-American, America East Tournament MVP and All-America East First Team attackman, earned a DI-single season record 82 goals to lead DI with 4.56 per game, adding 37 assists for 119 points, the second-best all-time single season tally only to Lyle Thompson.  He earned at least four points in 17 of UAlbany’s 18 games, including six games with at least six goals.  He earned seven goals and two assists apiece in each America East Tournament victory.

After dazzling the lacrosse world with amazing talent and ability, Miles Thompson and Lyle Thompson, brothers, teammates and Native Americans, were honored as co-winners of the 2014 Tewaaraton Trophy.
This honor was bestowed at the Tewaaraton Ceremony at the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Honored guests included the many of the Thompson family, the UAlbany coaching staff, plus numerous lacrosse supporters and players and coaches from around the country.
This is a historic day for the world of lacrosse, with the Thompsons, members of the Onondaga Nation, becoming the first Native Americans to be honored with the Tewaaraton Trophy.
“It is the best feeling to share the award with my brother and be the first Native Americans to win it,” said Miles Thompson. “No words can express this feeling.”
“Words cannot describe how happy I am, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Lyle Thompson. “To share the award with my brother is an honor.”
Since its inception in 2001, the Tewaaraton Trophy, on the men’s or women’s side, has never been awarded to a pair of players. The Thompson brothers become the first pair to achieve such a feat. Each gave a speech to the crowd, bringing both, as well as many in the audience, to tears.
“We grew up together, we stuck together throughout high school, and it shows how close we are,” said Miles Thompson.
“For us it is about bringing a positive influence and helping people, not just Native Americans, but everyone,” said Lyle Thompson.
“It is just humbling, it is an amazing honor to our university and program, honoring the players and coaches,” said UAlbany head coach Scott Marr. “It is great to have the first Native Americans winning the honor. I cannot imagine how special it is for these two to win it together, for all of their family and teammates.”
This is the first Tewaaraton Trophy to players from the America East since 2001, when Hofstra’s Doug Shanahan was selected as the award’s first recipient.
Lyle Thompson, the USILA DI Outstanding Player of the Year, Outstanding Attackman and America East Player of the Year, finished with the top single season in Division I history, earning a DI-high 77 assists plus 51 goals to total 128 points, leading all of DI with 7.11 points per game. He earned at least four points in all 18 of UAlbany’s games, including at least seven points in 11 games, including three goals and five assists in the win over Loyola against Joe Fletcher, a fellow Tewaaraton finalist.
Miles Thompson, a USILA First Team All-American, America East Tournament MVP and All-America East First Team attackman, earned a DI-single season record 82 goals to lead DI with 4.56 per game, adding 37 assists for 119 points, the second-best all-time single season tally only to Lyle Thompson. He earned at least four points in 17 of UAlbany’s 18 games, including six games with at least six goals. He earned seven goals and two assists apiece in each America East Tournament victory.

“Lacrosse Magazine June 2014” Issue Released Featuring Team USA Men’s Preview And The Tewaaraton Award (The Heisman Of Lacrosse)


COVER STORY – Star Power The biggest names in the game come together this summer in Denver, where Team USA seeks to take home a second straight gold medal against a powerful slate of opponents headlined by 2006 world champion and 2010 runner-up Canada.  FEATURES The Heisman of Lacrosse  From its physical heft to its metaphorical meaning, the Tewaaraton Award carries some serious weight in the lacrosse world. Several past winners tell us the stories of their trophies. by Mark Macyk | Online Extra: 2014 Tewaaraton Finalists Team USA Preview  An in-depth intreview over oysters with lacrosse mega-star Paul Rabil, a feature on the self-dscribed dorky defenseman known as Fletch and the unlikely union of Rob Pannell and Steele Stanwick headline this special 15-page package leading into July's FIL World Championships in Denver.  Devon Wills' Pro Day  Lacrosse Magazine follows the world-renowned women's lacrosse goalie in her historic pursuit of a roster spot in Major League Lacrosse, becoming the first female to break the MLL barrier with the New York Lizards. by Corey McLaughlin | Online Coverage: Wills Impresses at Pro Day | Photo Gallery | Wills Makes History, NY Practice Squad  Jump to Inclusion  US Lacrosse hopes to 'move the nedle' to diversify the sport so it reflects the demographics of all communities. by Paul Ohanion  COLUMNS From the Editor: Season of Upstarts His Space: Don't Assume Anything Her Space: Checking Your Ego DEPARTMENTS Nike/USL High School Rundown  Who rules the roost as high school state playoffs go down to the wire? Keep up with the latest on LaxMagazine.com - Weekly Nike/US Lacrosse Top 25 pool updates and more: Boys | Girls  Lifestyles  Once a member of New Hampshire's NCAA championship squad in the early 1980's, Katey Stone is a leading light in the women's hockey world, having coached the U.S. women at the recent Sochi Olympics. She talks on the similarities between players of the two sports and her expriences at the top of both games. Your Edge  Loyola's Australian Sensation Marlee Paton puts on a free-position shooting clinic, while Team USA's Ned Crotty breaks down how to victimize a short stick d-middie if you happen to find yourself covered by one. Give and Go  Penn State's Maggie McCormick wanted to be a marine biologist, but she's found herself on a career path that supports her aptitude for working with people. She answers our questions on lacrosse and life in this month's Give and Go interview.

COVER STORY – Star Power
The biggest names in the game come together this summer in Denver, where Team USA seeks to take home a second straight gold medal against a powerful slate of opponents headlined by 2006 world champion and 2010 runner-up Canada.
FEATURES
The Heisman of Lacrosse
From its physical heft to its metaphorical meaning, the Tewaaraton Award carries some serious weight in the lacrosse world. Several past winners tell us the stories of their trophies.
by Mark Macyk | Online Extra: 2014 Tewaaraton Finalists
Team USA Preview
An in-depth intreview over oysters with lacrosse mega-star Paul Rabil, a feature on the self-dscribed dorky defenseman known as Fletch and the unlikely union of Rob Pannell and Steele Stanwick headline this special 15-page package leading into July’s FIL World Championships in Denver.
Devon Wills’ Pro Day
Lacrosse Magazine follows the world-renowned women’s lacrosse goalie in her historic pursuit of a roster spot in Major League Lacrosse, becoming the first female to break the MLL barrier with the New York Lizards.
by Corey McLaughlin | Online Coverage: Wills Impresses at Pro Day | Photo Gallery | Wills Makes History, NY Practice Squad
Jump to Inclusion
US Lacrosse hopes to ‘move the nedle’ to diversify the sport so it reflects the demographics of all communities.
by Paul Ohanion
COLUMNS
From the Editor: Season of Upstarts
His Space: Don’t Assume Anything
Her Space: Checking Your Ego
DEPARTMENTS
Nike/USL High School Rundown
Who rules the roost as high school state playoffs go down to the wire? Keep up with the latest on LaxMagazine.com – Weekly Nike/US Lacrosse Top 25 pool updates and more: Boys | Girls
Lifestyles
Once a member of New Hampshire’s NCAA championship squad in the early 1980’s, Katey Stone is a leading light in the women’s hockey world, having coached the U.S. women at the recent Sochi Olympics. She talks on the similarities between players of the two sports and her expriences at the top of both games.
Your Edge
Loyola’s Australian Sensation Marlee Paton puts on a free-position shooting clinic, while Team USA’s Ned Crotty breaks down how to victimize a short stick d-middie if you happen to find yourself covered by one.
Give and Go
Penn State’s Maggie McCormick wanted to be a marine biologist, but she’s found herself on a career path that supports her aptitude for working with people. She answers our questions on lacrosse and life in this month’s Give and Go interview.

NCAA Lacrosse: Cornell Men’s Lacrosse Sr. Attacker Rob Pannell Named 2013 Tewaaraton Trophy Winner As Nation’s Top Lacrosse Player


Cornell Men's Lacrosse Rob Pannell 2013 Tewaaraton Trophy Winner

Rob Pannell has been named the winner of the 2013 Tewaaraton Trophy, the premier award in collegiate lacrosse, in a ceremony held this evening at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC. He becomes the Big Red’s second recipient of the award, joining Max Seibald ’09, and Cornell is now one of four schools to boast multiple Tewaaraton Trophy winners (Duke, Syracuse, UVA).
“It’s a tremendous honor to win such a prestigious award and to be the second Cornellian to win along with my best friend Max Seibald,” said Pannell. “This award really belongs to my team, especially the senior class. It speaks volumes about the great team we had this year and to the success that we had. Without them I would not have received this award tonight. I couldn’t be happier to represent Cornell University and the Cornell Lacrosse family and need to thank everyone that has helped along the way!”
The award is the latest in a long list for Pannell, who was recently named the winner of the USILA Lt. Raymond J. Enners Award, for the Outstanding DI Player of the Year, as well as the Ivy League Player of the Year. He is the first-ever three-time Ivy League Player of the Year in men’s lacrosse and just the fourth player in the history of Division I college lacrosse to be named conference player of the year three times during their career.
The all-time NCAA Division I career points leader (354), Pannell became one of just four Cornell players to earn All-American honors four times during their career when the teams were announced last week. A two-time Tewaaraton Trophy finalist, he has been named first-team All-American for the past three seasons, after earning a third-team selection as a freshman. Pannell is also just the third men’s lacrosse player in the history of the Ivy League to be named a four-time first-team All-Ivy selection.
One of the greatest to ever play the game at Cornell, Pannell has proven to be one of the most consistent players in the country, having registered at least one point in all 72 games of his career. He capped his senior season by ranking third in the nation in points per game (5.67), third overall in assists per game (3.06), and 14th overall in goals per game (2.61).
Pannell finished the 2013 campaign with 102 points, just three off the school record, set by Mike French in 1976. His 55 assists during the season are good for fourth overall in Cornell history, while his 47 goals rank 10th best in a single season.

NCAA Lacrosse: Syracuse Men’s Lacrosse Senior Middie JoJo Marasco Named A 2013 Tewaaraton Award Finalist; Holds Orange Single-Season Record For Assists By A Middie With 35 (53 Total Points)


Syracuse Men's Lacrosse Senior Middie JoJo Marasco 2013 Tewaaraton Finalist

Senior midfielder JoJo Marasco has been named one of the five finalists for the 2013 Tewaaraton Award, presented by Panama Jack. Presented to the top male and female collegiate lacrosse player, the Tewaaraton Award is the sport’s pre-eminent individual honor.
The finalists for this year’s award were announced on Thursday, May 9 by the Tewaaraton Award Foundation. In addition to Marasco, the list of finalists includes attackmen Rob Pannell (Cornell), Marcus Holman (North Carolina), Lyle Thompson (Albany) and midfielder Tom Schreiber (Princeton).
The 2013 BIG EAST Midfielder of the Year, Marasco is the Orange’s season leader in points (53) and holds the school single-season record for assists by a midfielder (35). He has at least one point in every game this season and has 14 multi-point games. Marasco ranks second in the BIG EAST in assists per game (2.19) and he is tied for fourth in the conference in points per game (3.31).
Since 2001, the Tewaaraton Award has been given to the top men’s and women’s lacrosse player in the nation, as voted upon by a selection committee made up of current and retired coaches. The five men’s and women’s finalists are invited to the 13th annual Tewaaraton Award Ceremony Thursday, May 30 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Event details and ticket information can be found at http://www.Tewaaraton.com.

NCAA Lacrosse: #8 Syracuse Men’s Lacrosse Middie Henry Schoonmaker (Lincoln HS, OR) Tallies Six Points (4 Goals, 2 Assists) In Leading Orange To A 13-12 Win Over #7 Princeton On April 6; Follows Colgate’s Peter Baum (2012 Tewaaraton Award) As Latest Lincoln High Star Making Impact At D1 Level


Syracuse Men's Lacrosse Henry Schoonmaker vs Princeton


Late in the fourth quarter of the best game of his young career, Henry Schoonmaker (Lincoln HS, OR) needed a break.
After the redshirt freshman poked the ball free on a faceoff to get the Syracuse men’s lacrosse team possession, he scored the tying goal and scooped up the ground ball on the ensuing faceoff to give the Orange a chance to take the lead.
John Desko took a timeout to set up his offense.
Schoonmaker — exhausted by that point — walked slowly over to the sideline, happy his career night would briefly be put on hold.
“I was a little happy when the timeout came,” he said. “I haven’t felt like that since high school running that much. It was definitely nice to get that timeout.”
Senior JoJo Marasco ultimately scored the game winning goal on that possession, but Schoonmaker was the key in No. 8 Syracuse’s 13-12 come-from-behind win over No. 7 Princeton on Saturday at Princeton Stadium. The midfielder tallied a career-high six points on four goals and two assists to spark the Orange offense but also came up huge as a wing on faceoffs. He made big plays to start and finish the game for SU (7-2).
“He definitely came out with a bang today,” junior Matt Harris said. “He’s a stud athlete. He can run. He can pass. He can shoot. I think it was kind of his coming out party today.”
Schoonmaker got involved with early with two quick goals in the first quarter but showed up again in the fourth to help SU rally for the win.
Princeton took a 12-10 lead with 6:57 left, but Syracuse quickly mounted a comeback. Billy Ward scored from the top of the crease on a feed from Marasco, and Schoonmaker took over from there.
Tigers faceoff specialist Justin Murphy won the ensuing faceoff forward, but Schoonmaker flew in from the wing to poke the ball away. After Harris eventually gobbled up the ground ball, Schoonmaker ripped a shot into the top corner to even the score at 12-12.
On the next faceoff, the sophomore ripped the ball out of a scrum at the X and picked it up himself this time to give SU possession.

For more:  http://www.syracuse.com/orangelacrosse/index.ssf/2013/04/henry_schoonmaker_syracuse_lac.html

NCAA Lacrosse: Denver Men’s Lacrosse Attacker Eric Law Is “Playing At A Tewaaraton Award Level” According To Lacrosse Magazine


Eric Law Denver Men's Lacrosse

Denver Men’s Lacrosse Attackman Eric Law is playing at a Tewaaraton Award level through the early part of 2013. Despite a 13-12 overtime loss to Notre Dame, Law showed he not only deserves to be on this list, but could be higher. Law had four goals, on five shots, and two assists in the loss. Evan Washburn/Lacrosse Magazine.

2013 Denver Men's Lacrosse