Tag Archives: US Lacrosse

US Lacrosse Announces “2014 WCLA Lacrosse National Championship” Seedings: #1 Pittsburgh, Florida Club, Ohio State Club, Georgia And UCLA


Pittsburgh University earned the top seed in the Division I bracket of the 2014 US Lacrosse Women’s Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA) National Championships, presented by Harrow Sports, while University of North Carolina Club earned the No. 1 seed in the Division II bracket.

Pittsburgh University earned the top seed in the Division I bracket of the 2014 US Lacrosse Women’s Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA) National Championships, presented by Harrow Sports, while University of North Carolina Club earned the No. 1 seed in the Division II bracket.

Division I

No. 1 University of Pittsburgh
No. 2 University of Florida Club
No. 3 Ohio State University Club
No. 4 University of Georgia
No. 5 University of California Los Angeles
No. 6 Santa Clara University
No. 7 Colorado State University
No. 8 University of Michigan Club
No. 9 Towson University Club
No. 10 University of California Santa Barbara
No. 11 University of Colorado Boulder
No. 12 Virginia Tech University Club
No. 13 University of Texas
No. 14 University of Delaware Club
No. 15 Boston College Club
No. 16 Oregon State University

Division II

No. 1 University of North Carolina Club
No. 2 James Madison University Club
No. 3 University of Utah
No. 4 Loyola University Maryland Club
No. 5 Gonzaga University
No. 6 Duke University Club
No. 7 Southern Methodist University
No. 8 Oakland University
No. 9 University of Denver Club
No. 10 University of California San Diego
No. 11 University of Minnesota Duluth
No. 12 SUNY Cortland Club

The event, featuring the top women’s collegiate club teams in the country, takes place May 7-10 at the Princess Anne Athletic Complex & Stadium in Virginia Beach, Va. The Division I bracket includes 16 teams while the Division II bracket has 12 teams. Both tournament fields are comprised of a combination of teams earning automatic qualifiers as league champions and teams earning at-large berths. Division I and II seeds are listed below.

Pittsburgh brings a 17-1 overall record and nine-game winning streak into the WCLA championship tournament, including a 14-12 win last weekend over Ohio State Club in the championship game of the Women’s Collegiate Lacrosse League (WCLL) tournament. The Panthers were WCLA national quarterfinalists last year and are making their ninth overall appearance in the US Lacrosse WCLA National Championship.

Defending Division I national champion Colorado State, which has won the national title four times, is seeded seventh and is making its 11th consecutive appearance in the championship. The Rams beat UC Santa Barbara 14-4 in last year’s national championship game.

In the Division II bracket, University of North Carolina Club earned the top seed and brings an unblemished 11-0 overall record into the WCLA National Championship. The Tar Heels won the Mid Atlantic Women’s Lacrosse League (MAWLL) Division II title last week with a 15-14 overtime win over James Madison University Club, last year’s Division II national champion. James Madison is the number two seed in this year’s championship.

US Lacrosse Releases “2013 Lacrosse Participation Survey”; Record Total Of 746,000 Players Competed On Organized Teams, A 34% Increase Since 2008


2013 Participation Survey

A record total of 746,859 players competed on organized lacrosse teams in 2013, as reported in the annual US Lacrosse Participation Report released today. The growth rate from last year (722,205) was 3.4 percent and youth participation topped 400,000 for the first time ever. The 403,770 youth participants represent over half of the total playing population and youth participation grew 3.6 percent over 2012. Roughly two-thirds of the youth participants are boys (265,428) and more players came from New York (55,298) than any other state. Lacrosse continues to be the fastest-growing sport at the high school level, and a total of 290,046 players competed in 2013. According to data from the NFHS, from 2008 to 2013, a total of 621 schools added boys’ teams and 588 schools added girls’ teams. Those figures represent a 34 percent increase in the number of boys’ programs and a 36 percent increase in the number of girls’ programs, easily outdistancing other sports in terms of percentage growth. The second-fastest growing sports are water polo (13 percent for boys) and ice hockey (14 percent for girls). Lacrosse is also the fastest-growing NCAA sport, and more than 35,000 players competed on varsity, club or junior college teams in 2013. A staggering 60 new varsity programs were added in 2013, including eight new NCAA Division I programs. US Lacrosse has produced the Participation Report annually since 2001, and over that time span the number of players has grown 194 percent, from 253,901 to 746,859. This survey counts only play on organized teams, and does not count leisure-time play of the sport. The primary source of data for this report is provided by the 67 US Lacrosse regional chapters. Each chapter reports detailed participation at the youth level, and significant data is also obtained from US Lacrosse membership records, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the National Federation of State High School Associations and LaxPower.com.

2013 US Lacrosse Participation Survey

“Lacrosse Magazine April 2014” Issue Released Featuring Team USA’s Lee Zink, Duke Men’s Casey Carroll And US Lacrosse “First Stick Program”


Lacrosse Magazine April 2014

COVER STORY – Worth the Wait They’ve toiled for years in pursuit of the opportunity that lay before them now – to represent their country on home soil. With the FIL World Championship just three months away, LM profiles three U.S. Team hopefuls on destiny’s doorstep- Lee Zink, Kevin Leveille and Chris Eck. FEATURES Casey’s Homecoming After four deployments as a U.S. Army Ranger, 29-year-old defenseman Casey Carroll feels lucky to be a Duke Blue Devil again. by Corey McLaughlin | Online Extra – “Tuesday’s With Corey” column on Carroll from earlier this spring. “I’m Kind of Unique” An injury at birth left Liberty’s Natalie Emery with limited use of her right arm, an obstacle the powerhouse lefty and Tennessee native now considers a gift. By Laurel Pfahler First Stick in Key West Not everyone in the Florida Keys is on vacation. Devoid of lacrosse in the southernmost point of the continental U.S., a few transplants used the US Lacrosse First Stick Program to get the sport off the ground. By Paul Ohanion COLUMNS From the Editor: Sports and Geopolitics His Space: Legend and Spirit Honored Her Space: For the Love of Lacrosse Boyle Point: The Trouble With Labels DEPARTMENTS High School Rundown Gaze on the early-season stars from the South and marquee games that could cause tectonic shifts in the Nike/US Lacrosse National Top 25 polls. The Scoop The Army-Navy rivalry comes to women’s lacrosse, the MLL and LXM Pro Tour play nice and former Princeton star Sean Hartofilis breaks into the movie business. World Lacrosse 2014 Navy’s Old Goats will be out in full force for the World Festivals in Denver. Your Edge Former Florida star and current Team USA midfielder Brittany Dashiell gives her tips for play between the lines. Give and Go Team USA assistant and Penn State University head coach Jeff Tambroni is on the hot seat this month. What did the former Hobart midfielder have to say to our questions?

US Lacrosse Releases “2014 Girls’ Lacrosse Rules – Rule Changes & Interpretation” (Video)


US Lacrosse Releases “2014 Rules For Boys Youth Lacrosse – Rule Interpretation” (Video)


Lacrosse Rules: US Lacrosse Releases “2014 Youth Rules & Best Practices Guidebook For Girls”


2014 Youth Rules & Best Practices Guidebook For Girls-page-001

Click on “Guidebook” to view online

High School Girls Lacrosse: US Lacrosse Announces 2014 Youth Rules Changes Featuring Strict Enforcement Of Illegal Body Contact, Repetitive Fouls And Four Minute Red Card Penalty


US Lacrosse Banner 2

US Lacrosse today announced the final rule revisions for the 2014 girls’ high school and youth lacrosse rules. Both sets of rules are endorsed by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) and written by the US Lacrosse Women’s Game Rules Subcommittee and approved by its Women’s Game Committee. The youth rules are a product of modifications to the high school rules.

The points of emphasis for the 2013-2014 season are strict enforcement of rules governing illegal: body contact, obstruction of free space to goal, repetitive fouls, and stick contact and cross checking. 

Major rule changes for the 2013-2014 season at all levels of play include:

  • decreasing the number of players from each team on the draw circle from five to three;
  • increasing penalty time for a red card from two minutes to four; 
  • disallowing additional facial protection to be worn other than ASTM International-approved goggles and mouth guard. ASTM International Women’s Lacrosse approved goggles have been the standard since the rule was created in 2004.

Girls Lacrosse Rule Changes

For more:  http://www.laxmagazine.com/high_school/girls/2012-13/news/10913_girls_hs_and_youth_rule_changes_announced

Concussions In Lacrosse: “Lacrosse Magazine” Presents “In-Depth Q&A” With US Lacrosse Sports Science & Safety Experts On The “Biology, Risks, And Long-Term Implications Of Concussions”


Dr. Margot Putukian and Dr. Ruben Echemendia of the US Lacrosse Sports Science and Safety Committee were among presenters at the International Consensus Conference on Concussions in Zurich, Switzerland.

Dr. Margot Putukian and Dr. Ruben Echemendia of the US Lacrosse Sports Science and Safety Committee were among presenters at the International Consensus Conference on Concussions in Zurich, Switzerland

What is the biology of a concussion? What actually happens to the brain?

RE: A concussion creates changes in the chemistry of the brain that produces a “neuro-metabolic cascade” that renders cells temporarily inoperative and vulnerable to further injury. This metabolic cascade is accompanied by a disruption of the blood supply to the brain, thereby reducing the amount of glucose (fuel) available to the brain for healing. These changes affect the entire brain, not just one region.

What are the risks of playing with a concussion? What is second-impact syndrome?

MP: It is difficult to know the exact risks of continuing to play while concussed, but in the younger athlete, there has been a concern that a second insult can occur while the athlete is still recovering from a first injury, and that a dysregulation in the blood flow to the brain can then result, causing a significant increase in the pressure in the brain. Though considered controversial by some researchers, second-impact syndrome has been reported in youth athletes and associated with significant complications, including death.

RE: Continuing to play while having symptoms places the vulnerable brain at risk for additional injury that may lead to more severe, prolonged or even life-long problems with cognitive and psychological functioning. Second-impact syndrome is rare and thought to occur when an individual sustains a blow to the brain during a time when the brain has not fully recovered from a previous concussion. The blow can often be a relatively mild one.

Are there long-term health implications from concussions?

MP: The majority of concussions resolve in 10-14 days without any known long-term consequences. However, in a very small percentage, there are persistent symptoms and ongoing difficulties with cognitive function or balance.

RE: Some studies suggest there can be long-term changes in neurocognitive functioning; others do not. There is no consensus among experts in the field. The key appears to be appropriate evaluation and management of the injury.

What impact, if any, does age play in concussions?

MP: Younger athletes appear to take longer to recover and therefore should be treated with caution. Other modifiers that are associated with a prolonged recovery include an increased number and duration of symptoms and a history of prior concussion. Other modifiers that may play a role in prolonged recovery include a history of migraine headaches, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (or other learning disorders) and history of depression, anxiety or other mental health disorders.

Besides rest (physical and mental), what else can help recovery?

MP: An initial period of rest is important, and avoiding cognitive activity, such as texting, video games and extended computer work, also is important. After a few days, light exercise can be initiated assuming it doesn’t worsen symptoms. It’s unclear if other interventions are helpful in assisting recovery, but alcohol, aspirin, narcotics and other medications that impair cognitive function or increase bleeding are typically avoided in the first few days.

RE: It is very important that athletes with concussions remain well hydrated, maintain good nutritional habits and get plenty of sleep. Keep in mind that physical and cognitive rest does not mean placing the child in a cocoon. Typical activities of daily living, including school, should be added as soon as they are tolerated without producing an increase in symptoms.

What misperceptions about concussions do you encounter?

MP: One myth is that helmets prevent concussion. Though they are effective in preventing skull fracture and bleeds, and may lessen impact forces, they do not prevent concussion. Sometimes the assumption is that putting a helmet on an athlete will protect them, when it might not. In fact, if they have a false sense of security, they may play more aggressively and therefore be at a greater risk for injury. Another myth is that the greater the impact force, the more likely that a concussion will occur or the more severe the concussion. There is not enough research to support this, and what limited data we have actually suggests that concussive injury can occur with different levels of impact.

RE: Some people still believe that you need to lose consciousness or have serious memory impairment to have a concussion. Neither is true. Some believe that a concussion is a bruise to the brain; it is not. Many believe that you have to be hit hard or be hit on the head to have a concussion. Neither is true.

Can you comment on the effectiveness of neurocognitive (baseline) testing?

RE: Baseline testing can be very useful in establishing the pre-injury functioning of the athlete. If available, athletes should take advantage of baseline testing. However, baseline testing sometimes creates significant complexity in the evaluation of an athlete’s cognitive functioning. Because of this complexity, a qualified neuropsychologist should interpret any neuropsychological testing.

MP: The utility of baseline computerized neuropsychological testing has recently been questioned. Although it appears to promising, there are several factors to consider in NP testing including the effects of fatigue, injury and motivation.

What are your opinions on the return-to-play laws that have been passed in 49 states and D.C.?

MP: The Zack Lystedt Law passed in Washington State was the first of many that have raised the awareness of the importance of this injury as well as the importance of removing athletes from play when signs and symptoms of concussion are present.

RE: These laws are a good first step towards raising awareness and providing basic guidelines for the management of concussion. The laws are not uniform across states, and hence some are better than others.

US Lacrosse contends there yet no scientific evidence to suggest helmets prevent concussions. Do you adhere to this position?

RE: Yes, this is accurate. Helmets are designed to prevent catastrophic head injury, and they are very good at doing that. They just were not designed to, and do not, prevent concussion.

MP: We need to explore the effects of various headgear options and continue to investigate the mechanisms of injury in lacrosse for both the men’s and women’s game, and evaluate interventions that can decrease injury — including rule changes, rule enforcement, coaches and player education. Whether future equipment modifications can prevent or lessen the severity of injury remains unanswered at this time.

Do you have other recommendations from the conference in Zurich?

MP: There has been a lot of research regarding the assessment and management of concussion that has led to a more cautious approach to this important injury. There are advanced neuroimaging techniques which show promise in demonstrating functional and structural injury with concussion. There also has been a significant amount of information regarding the acceleration forces that occur in different sports that quantify the number, extent and location of forces to the head with sport.

RE: Thus far we have focused a great deal of attention, effort and money on baseline testing but have not focused much on the post-injury evaluation, which is in many ways far more crucial. It is imperative that any athlete with a concussion be evaluated by a qualified medical professional who is specifically trained in the evaluation and management of this injury. The use of a multidisciplinary team of professionals — physicians, neuropsychologists and athletic trainers — is ideal.

For more:  http://laxmagazine.com/genrel/100713_what_is_a_concussion_q_and_a_with_us_lacrosse_experts

Lacrosse Legends: “2013 National Lacrosse Hall Of Fame Class” Features Seven All-American Players And One Coach For Induction Ceremony On Oct 26


US Lacrosse 2013 Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony

The 2013 induction class for the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame has been approved by the US Lacrosse Board of Directors. This year’s eight-person class will be officially inducted in a ceremony, sponsored by Bollinger Sports Insurance and the Markel Insurance Company, on Saturday, October 26, at The Grand Lodge in Hunt Valley, Md.
The members of the 2013 induction class are: Jim Berkman, Quinn Carney, Michele DeJuliis, Sue Heether, Bill Miller, Tracy Stumpf, Ryan Wade, and Michael Watson.
Jim Berkman
Berkman will be inducted as a truly great coach. He completed his 25th season as the head coach at Salisbury (Md.) University in 2013 and his year 26th overall as a head coach. Berkman is the all-time winningest coach in NCAA men’s lacrosse history, with a 428-48 career record through the 2013 season. Berkman has won the NCAA Division III national championship 10 times (1994, 1995, 1999, 2003-05, 2007, 2008, 2001, 2012) – all at Salisbury – and finished as the national runner-up four other times. He also has the highest winning percentage (90.1%) of any men’s college coach in history. Berkman has coached Salisbury to seven undefeated seasons and 17 conference championships. He has been recognized three times as the USILA’s national coach of the year (1991, 2008, 2012), and eight times as his conference’s coach of the year.
Quinn Carney
Carney will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-year starter as a midfielder at the University of Maryland, Carney was a two-time All-American, earning first team honors in 2001 and third team honors in 1999. She helped to lead the Terrapins to four straight NCAA national championships from 1998-2001, and three straight ACC Championships from 1999-2001. Carney was a three-time All-ACC selectee (1999-2001) and was also selected to the ACC’s 50th Anniversary Team in 2002. She finished her Maryland career ranked third on the school’s all-time list in assists (110), fifth in goals (162) and fifth in points (265). She was a two-time member of the U.S. Women’s World Cup Team (2001, 2005) and named to the All-World Team in 2005. Carney holds the record for most goals scored in World Cup play (37) by a U.S. player.
Michele DeJuliis
DeJuliis will be inducted as a truly great player. She was a four-time All-American at Penn State University, earning first team honors in 1995, 1996 and 1997, and third team honors in 1994. DeJuliis finished her career ranked sixth on Penn State’s all-time scoring list with 203 points, and led the Nittany Lions in scoring in 1994, 1995 and 1996. As a senior, she served as team captain and was selected for the North-South All-Star Game. DeJuliis was a member of the U.S. Women’s National Team Program from 1994-2009, and served as captain of the 2009 World Cup team that won the world championship. She has received both the Amy Willard Award (1997) and the Beth Allen Award (2009) as a participant in US Lacrosse’s Women’s National Tournament, and has been honored twice as MVP of the Vail Shootout Tournament.
Sue Heether
Heether will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-year starter at Loyola University Maryland, Heether was a first-team All-American in 1990 and also selected as the IWLCA’s national goalie of the year that season. She was a three-time member of the U.S. Women’s World Cup Team (1993, 1997, 2001), helping Team USA capture the world championship in each of those years. She also served as an alternate to the team in 1989 and 2005. Heether ranks second all-time in saves (53) by a U.S. player in World Cup competition. Following her playing career, she added a fourth World Cup title as head coach of the U.S. team in 2009. Heether was recipient of US Lacrosse’s Beth Allen Award in 2005 as the most outstanding U.S. team player at the National Tournament.
Bill Miller
Miller will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a four-time All-American at Hobart (N.Y.) College, earning first team honors in 1989, 1990 and 1991, and honorable mention status in 1988. Additionally, Miller was a two-time winner of both the USILA’s national Division III player of the year award and national attackman of the year award (1990, 1991). He helped lead Hobart to four NCAA Division III national championships (1988-1991) during his career, and finished as Hobart’s all-time leader in goals (173), and second all-time in assists (145) and points (318). Miller played professionally in the indoor NLL for the Philadelphia Wings from 1991-1998, and was MVP of the NLL’s championship game in 1998. He was also a two-time member of the U.S. Men’s National Team, helping Team USA to world championships in 1994 and 1998.
Tracy Stumpf
Stumpf will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-year starter on defense at the University of Maryland, Stumpf was a two-time, first team All-American, earning the honor in both 1985 and 1986. She was also named to the NCAA’s All-Tournament Team three times (1984, 1985, 1986) and was team captain for the Terrapins’ first national championship team in 1986. Stumpf played in the North-South All-Star Game in 1986. Additionally, she was named to the ACC’s 50th Anniversary Team in 2002, and the NCAA’s 25th Anniversary Team in 2006. Stumpf spent seven years (1986-1993) as a member of the U.S. Women’s National Team Program, and was a member of the 1989 championship-winning U.S. World Cup Team. She served as an alternate for the 1986 U.S. World Cup Team.
Ryan Wade
Wade will be inducted as a truly great player. He was a three-time All-American at the University of North Carolina, earning first team honors in 1993 and 1994, and second team honors in 1992. Additionally, Wade was tabbed as the USILA’s midfielder of the year in 1993. Wade was the ACC’s player of the year in both 1993 and 1994, and was a four-time selectee to the All-ACC team (1991-1994). North Carolina won four ACC championships during his tenure, and also captured the NCAA national championship in 1991. Wade was a member of three U.S. national teams, playing on the U-19 squad in 1992 and the world champion U.S. Men’s National Team in both 1994 and 1998. He was selected to the All-World Team in 1998, and also named as winner of the Best and Fairest Player Award (MVP) at the 1998 world championship.
Michael Watson
Watson will be inducted as a truly great player. A four-time All-American at the University of Virginia, Watson earned first team honors in 1996 and 1997, second team honors in 1995, and third team honors in 1994. He was also named as the USILA’s attackman of the year in 1996. Watson won the ACC’s Rookie of the Year Award as a freshman in 1994 and the ACC’s Player of the Year Award as a senior in 1997. He was also a four-time All-ACC team selectee. Watson helped lead the Cavaliers to the NCAA national championship game in both 1994 and 1996, and was named the NCAA Tournament’s most outstanding player in 1996. He finished his career ranked second on UVA’s all-time scoring list with 141 goals. Watson was a member of the 1998 U.S. Men’s National Team, and a five-time all-star professionally in Major League Lacrosse.

Lacrosse Injury Prevention: US Lacrosse Releases “How To Make Proper Contact In Men’s & Boys Lacrosse” Online Instructional Course (Video)


US Lacrosse BannerThe US Lacrosse new online instructional course, How to Make Proper Contact in Men’s & Boys’ Lacrosse, is available free of charge to all of its members at uslacrossecourses.org.

After several years of development and collaboration with professionals in martial arts, gymnastics and other contact sports, US Lacrosse has developed the course to help reduce the number of injuries resulting from illegal and hard hits by teaching proper technique to deliver and receive contact in men’s and boys’ lacrosse.

The course, featuring host Sam Bradman (LXM Pro Tour), is a valuable resource for coaches, players, parents and officials. It navigates the user through nine units of written and video instruction, graphs, drills and other US Lacrosse resources for members to use and refer to as often as needed. The units cover a range of topics including: what is making contact in lacrosse, age-appropriate contact, injuries and contact, receiving contact, making contact, and more.

Find out more at USLacrosse.org.